#1
Two mind about this. Anchoring has me feeling confident regarding the position of my right hand and I can get some great speed this way. On the other hand it limits the motion of my ring finger which in turn (I think) makes my playing less fluid.

When not anchoring my right hand feels far more fluid, but I can often hit the wrong string. Just keep practising without anchoring? Opinions?
#2
I'd say to practice without anchoring. With in a week or so (give or take) you will start getting used to it and eventually it will feel normal. At least that's how it went with me.

However I am not completely certain how bad anchoring is and I am sure there are ton of great classical guitarist who do anchor. But in my opinion it is better not to because like you said it limits motion so it is only a hindrance.
And everything that once was
infinitely far
and unsayable is now
unsayable
and right here in the room.


- Franz Wright
#3
I fingerpick just about 100% of the time and - most of the time* - I anchor with my little finger. I've been doing it that way for over 40 years and it works for me.

*I do play some songs without anchoring - don't know why, it's just the way the particular songs have evolved - could be because of the particular picking pattern
Last edited by Garthman at Mar 10, 2015,
#4
I don't.... I use what's essentially a classical-guitar technique. Like the other reply, my ring finger will hardly bend at all if my pinkie is rigid.
An old technique I read about years ago was to clench your fist with your hand held in playing position, and then open your fingers. That should give you the most natural playing position.
#5
yes anchoring the pinky does inhibit the ring finger..but dedicated practice for that
problem should overcome it
i also use a thumbpleck when anchoring with the palm is more convenient
i suppose it depends on what style of music your into + what you feel comfortable with
#6
Quote by NougatOfficial
However I am not completely certain how bad anchoring is and I am sure there are ton of great classical guitarist who do anchor. But in my opinion it is better not to because like you said it limits motion so it is only a hindrance.

No, there are no good classical guitarist that would ever anchor their pinky. However, you can anchor your thumb on an adjacent string if a passage only requires the i, m, and a fingers.
#7
Quote by gweddle.nz
Two mind about this. Anchoring has me feeling confident regarding the position of my right hand and I can get some great speed this way. On the other hand it limits the motion of my ring finger which in turn (I think) makes my playing less fluid.

When not anchoring my right hand feels far more fluid, but I can often hit the wrong string. Just keep practising without anchoring? Opinions?


I use both. You get more speed and less fatigue without anchoring, but anchoring gives you the ability to dampen strings and it yields a different attack which is sometimes preferable.
#8
I'm going to continue practising without anchoring. I feel anchoring would be fine if I wasn't using my ring finger (like some guitarists do) but I just can't get a fluid rhythm with my ring finger when anchored, and neither can I get the optimal angle of attack with the nail.
#9
Quote by reverb66
I use both. You get more speed and less fatigue without anchoring, but anchoring gives you the ability to dampen strings and it yields a different attack which is sometimes preferable.


I agree with this. It depends what style you're going for - I do a lot of travispicking where the bass strings need to be palm muted, and I find that I am more confident with my right hand with the pinky anchored. Sometimes when I'm going for a big 'grab' to create a bigger sound over a few notes, I might lift the pinky off, but it goes straight back on afterwards.

I've never thought of the ring finger motion being limited until this thread!
#10
Quote by Quavers
I agree with this. It depends what style you're going for - I do a lot of travispicking where the bass strings need to be palm muted, and I find that I am more confident with my right hand with the pinky anchored. Sometimes when I'm going for a big 'grab' to create a bigger sound over a few notes, I might lift the pinky off, but it goes straight back on afterwards.

I've never thought of the ring finger motion being limited until this thread!


It probably depends on your fingers and nails. I just can't get a good angle of attack with my ring finger nail while my pinky is anchored. My ring finger nail is fairly curved and not as wide or as flat as my other nails. Because of this I'm virtually forced to use the skin on the ring finger if I play anchored.