#1
Need advice for recording. I have a Steinberg ur22, a boss multi effects pedal and a Dean guitar with single coil passives. When I play through my amp it sounds really good but when I record the multi-effects pedal into Reaper through the Steinberg it has a watered down or muffled quality that lacks presence. I'm kind of new to Reaper so what are some tips to get better quality out of Reaper?

It's 24bit recording quality. In Reaper all I use really is a volume controller that prevents anomalous sounds from clipping at extremely high volume and a high pass filter. Raw it sounds muddled and filtered it still sounds muddled but does not have extreme volume swells or anomalous vibrations. Any tips on how to get a punchier more present sound similar to how my amp sounds (Peavey 175 watt tube). It's presently got that recorded in a basement sound and I want to sound like you are in my house listening to me play with great clarity. I want to be able to play harmony as well as melody, my fx pedal has a full EQ as well as a compressor, chorus, reverb.

If I turn chorus up it has a recorded in a hallway sound and turned down it sounds very flat and the reverb creates very unpleasant vibrations. I like to turn the bass and middle down a lot in the EQ because turned up the bass is completely dominant in the sound and is painful to the ear. On the Steinberg I have the input gain on about 4/10. My guitar I use mostly neck and middle pickup selection with tone knob at 8/10 and volume knobs at 8.5/10. If there are any settings that I can change for a clearer more present tone please tell me.
Last edited by farcry at Mar 10, 2015,
#2
You have to tweak your effects for direct recording, depending on the Boss multifx, you might have a settings for output to amp (different type/size amps) or output to direct (mixing board). Set on "mixing board"/direct output if you can, then tune your effects to what you want to hear.

If you like what your amp reproduces, you can add a microphone to the cab and record that. On budget try Shure PG57, if you want to spend more for a better mic Sennheiser e609 or Shure Sm57.

Third alternative would be to get into some vst amp simulations and do everything in the box and just plug in direct or bypass your multifx amp cabinet modeling and just use cabinet emulation from vst (some freeware ones would be LePou, other options available - read the sticky). I guess some of the software amp models sold to look into if you want to go that route: Peavey Revalver, Amplitube, Guitar Rig, etc.

Here is a fuller list:
http://www.musicradar.com/us/news/tech/the-11-best-vst-guitar-amp-effect-modelling-plug-ins-in-the-world-today-427789

Not sure what you're doing with the volume controller in Reaper but while recording it is best to capture sounds that do not clip, so try to dial that in from your input volume instead of doing it in automated fashion in Reaper. Later on you can slap compressor/limiter on the guitars if you want but try to get best sound at source.
Last edited by diabolical at Mar 10, 2015,
#3
Yeah I turned off the compressor on the pedal. I like to go through it because the sound is weak straight out of the guitar into the ur22. The pedal has good sound quality because through an amp and with headphones the pedal sounds fantastic but through the Steinberg it's watered down sounding. The ur22 has a clipping indicator and I figured out how to make sure it never clips it's just the sound quality. I think you're right about the direct recording, that's probably part of the issue it probably is not on direct.

Should I change the buffer size or sample rate? The buffer size is 64 samples and the samplerate is 44.1 khz.
#4
can i get a sample wav or mp3 ? a few seconds would do...
Last edited by NRG_sama_ at Mar 10, 2015,
#6
gt-6. After some tweaking I've been able to get a really good tone finally to record. The bass was up too high and was causing really bad feedback like reverberations and the fx pedal was clipping the ur22. I'll put some sound files up later. You might think the gt-6 is old and crappy but it comes down to understanding the EQ and the settings. At the right settings it is very pleasant and can be turned way up. That's what I'm going for, if it doesn't sound good with the volume cranked way up then it's no good.
Last edited by farcry at Mar 10, 2015,