#1
I haven't been playing guitar for long and a neighbour of mine suggested we jam. i have never played guitar with another person before and was wondering what to expect? I know it must clearly be different for each person/group of people but what is 'usual' to do in this situation?

#2
Just following along with each other, usually. I mean, a "jam" can vary wildly depending on what kind of music the people are playing. Just make sure that you're good enough at playing to pick up on a simple chord progression someone else is playing and put a lead on it, or at least play the chords along with them and let them play lead. If you're not at that point yet, you're not ready for jams.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#3
Just play songs that you both know. That's a good way to get started. You can also come up with your own stuff. It doesn't need to be that serious.

Having some go-to chord progressions/grooves doesn't hurt. 12 bar blues will always work.

I think everybody is ready to jam (as long as you can at least play chords). You should start jamming with others as soon as possible. Because that's how you learn to play music. When you jam with other people, it forces you to use your ears and listen to the other musicians. It makes you play musically.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#4
^Good advice. And yeah, you definitely don't need to be super good to start jamming. Just be sure you know some basic chords and can play in rhythm easily. I've just had beginning players try to jam with me, because jamming is fun, but they can't even make a chord change without missing a beat and throwing off the rhythm. And that's just not gonna work. No offense to people at that level of playing (we were all there at some point), but that's just not jam ready. Need a little more time playing alone with a metronome or alongside a recording.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#5
ok thanks thats helpful. so how does it generally start? i know what chords fit into which keys etc so is it a good idea to choose a key to jam in?
#6
Just play a chord progression of your chossing, tell him (or he tells you if he starts) what chords they are if he cant figure them out, and then jam. Its not really rocket science, even if it is kinda akward at first. It will be easy if you are both at pretty much the same level of knowledge about theory and stuff, because if he doesnt know what a key is, its gonna be hard. And you both have to be able to play and keep steady rhythm, without that its just a painful experience.

It gets easier and more comfortable with time. I can pretty much anticipate all my band members changes to the progression or rhythm changes to the drums and stuff like that. Sometimes we even spontaniously harmonize a melody or whatnot. Its kinda crazy how in tune you can get with another musician.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#7
As I said, start with songs that you both know.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Take turns, one guy plays rhythm and the other guy improvises. 12 bar blues is great.

Or one guy plays some hyperspeed Yngwie rhythm that no normal human being could ever jam over, and then looks all self-satisfied with himself because he's stymied the other person.
#9
If it works the guitars will blend together.

You can count a song of and there you go not having to think about what the other guitarist is doing.

Both of you know your space and stay 100% loyal to that. Respect given when backing the other one up.

Typically one person starts playing and then the other plays along with it. Whatever he or she thinks may fit what you do.
Last edited by anders.jorgense at Mar 11, 2015,
#10
I always get nervous jamming with other guitarists, especially for the first time. I usually have a short panic in my head where I'l think, "what if I make a mistake and my first impression is ruined and they think I suck??" What helps me is to think to myself that I don't have to play the most technical, challenging stuff to impress or for it to sound good with another guitarist or other musicians. I forget a lot, but I try to remind myself, to play for the song and what fits most according to what the other guys are playing. Figure out what styles you guys like and just improve something or play songs you both know
#11
Hey I'll jam with just about anybody once, and I jam often. The best ones are when a someone lays down a groove and all the players fall in, listen to each other, and take turns bouncing off the changes. Some pretty cool musical exchanges happen on these nights. The worst ones happen when egos take front stage and it becomes a giant cutting contest or volume war. Music tends to go out the window here and I lose interest in the jam pretty quickly. If a player is not interested in exchanging musical ideas and just wants to shred mercilessly over everything, I get bored.

Over the years I have had the pleasure to jam with some pretty amazing Hollywood session pros and some 5 chord newbies. Both jams can be surprisingly good if everyone is listening to each other and contributing to the common groove.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#12
Hello!
Another piece of advice: start with a popular song that both of you know well. You can play chords for some time and, once you got the swing of it, one of you would start to improvise.
That's how it works for me usually - I need some 10 min of relaxed playing before coming into improvising mood.