#1
hey everyone , if you making a song .. and you figure out a good melody for it to play on one string .. how can you convert this solo from one string to a real music , chords and finger picking all over the guitar on all strings ...

i try to understand how music work but i do need some help in that

for example :

1-if the song was on Major scale key of C

then part of the song is played on C,D .. what is the correct chord for it .. and major , minor or diminshed ,,, how can you know ?

2- if we noticed E note all over the guitar ( six string) , going to find 12 E , two on every string , so what is the difference between one of them and the others ?


if someone have some advice that can help to understand music and harmony .. please write it to me ... thanks .
#2
Learn how to play them in chords. So if it goes G C G C on one string, Play that in chords and strum it to the rhythm. You need to do some serious googling on music theory and guitar chords and learn the basics. Then this will all be elementary
#3
You need to understand I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viio, to approach it from a theory standpoint. In general chords will stay completely in the key of the melody, but melodies also often go outside of the key, and harmonies as well, though I guess usually the harmony note that's not in the key will also be the melody note that's not in the key.

There is no "right" chord. There are a number of options, but usually you will be looking for a specific one in your mind, which is where theory comes in to help you find it.

Other than that, you can hunt for what you're looking for, knowing that the melody note will be part of the chord you're looking for. Although, you might also want to play the basic chord on your guitar, and the melody you sing is an extension on that chord. In which case you might not play the melody in the chord you play, although you could if you wanted to.

So, basically either guess or study harmony.

It's not the chord that matters so much as where in the key you are. There is a structure you don't know about. It's not just random chords and random melody notes. There is a pattern there which makes it all easy.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Mar 11, 2015,
#4
First, understand that there's a limit to how much of this you can understand academically. Yes, there are things we can talk about and that you can apply, but good music has to be understood aurally. You have to be able to hear it in practice if you want to create good music. At the end of the day, there is no substitute for you understanding what different choices will sound like, and how those impact the experience of listening to the song.

That being said, the basics or harmonization are this:

You have your melody line. You find the stressed notes. You put chords under the melody that include the stressed notes, or that combine with the stressed notes to create new chords that have the effect you want.

eg, let's say you're in the key of G, and your stressed note that you're trying to harmonize is a C.

Sticking with diatonic chords, your obvious choices to harmonize this are a C major chord, an A minor chord, or an F#dim chord, since those chords all contain a C note. (You could go non diatonic and include a F major chord, which would be a common choice, too). Which of those you pick will depend on what supports the emotional experience of the melody.

Or - and this is where things get more interesting, maybe what you want to do is to harmonize that C note with a D major chord, creating a D7 chord, because a D7 chord is what creates the experience you want but you don't want to just hammer out each chord on the guitar.

And, of course, it's not just the chord and melody note that create the experience, it's how they shift, how long you hold them, etc. e.g., holding that C note while the chord shifts from Am to D will have a different experience than holding that D chord while the melody moves from F# to A to C.
#5
1.

You need to understand keys and chord functions. Also, use your ears. There is no one correct way to harmonize a melody. But yeah, when it comes to harmonizing a melody, you want the melody to have chord tones in it. That's how you usually decide what chords to play over which notes. Also remember that not every note in the melody needs to be part of the chord. Let's say the melody goes like C D E F G. You could use just one chord to harmonize that - C major. The D and F would be passing tones. It's really common to have just one or two chords per bar.

You could of course also use one chord per note. So it could be C major over C, G major over D, C major over E, F major over F and G major over G. That would be a I-V-I-IV-V progression. There are other ways of harmonizing the melody too. Just look at chords that have those notes. But if the notes move fast, you don't want to change the chord all the time.

What chord you want to choose has a lot to do with the context. There are so many different ways of harmonizing a melody that has C and D notes in it. You need to give more information.

But yeah, I think you will figure it out best by just listening to your favorite songs. When do they change chords? What notes sound good over what chords? Learn it by ear. Write the chords down. Figure out the notes that are played/sung over different chords. Are they chord tones? Are they something else?

You'll also learn how chord progressions work by listening to music. Certain chords usually work better together than others. There is no right and wrong, though. Don't treat anything as rules because music is art and you can do anything you want - nothing is wrong, especially if it sounds good. There are just common practices. The most important thing is what you are after, what you hear in your head. If it sounds good, it is good.

2.

The different E notes you can find on the fretboard are the same note in different octaves and different positions. I would suggest learning all note names. If we name all the notes on the low E string, we get E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#. Then the same notes repeat in another octave. There are 12 notes.

The 5th fret of the low E string is an A. It is the same note as the open A string. So you can play the same pitch in many different positions. This makes it a lot easier to play all around the fretboard. You don't need to move your hands all the time, you can stay in one position and you can reach most of the notes you want to play.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
MM, I agree with your suggestions (especially the second one) to an extent. In my opinion, conventional harmony (chord progressions and diatonic stuff) is bull crap! Scales aren't songs and chords aren't either (unless accompanied by a bassline or vocals). I'm more of a chaotic musical type who prefers melody and atmosphere over conventional harmony. You've got to let the melodies speak and express themselves. I personally wouldn't bother trying to add chords to a melody for the sake of it. I'm not trolling (I try to be honest and polite both online and in person) but giving my perspective on this (this is how I feel).

It's also a good idea to use a computer to write melodies and see how they interact (this can be very interesting and provide alternative methods for harmony). Once again I'm not trolling (or trying to troll). Have a nice day.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#7
^ "I have no idea what I'm saying." lol.

EDIT(good point 20Tigers ): Why is the bass line or vocals so important? Sure, having a bass line makes the harmony easier to follow, etc, but saying chords and melodies built from scales can't be music unless accompanied by a bass line or vocals is plain and utter nonsense.

I mean, I agree that only making music theoretically isn't probably going to be very interesting, but why does having a bass line make the music that much more valid? That seems like an irrational argument. Or vocals? Why does a vocal line make the piece more valid? Vocals are just another melody line with a timbre that could be replaced by any other melodic instrument.

Unless you really mean "song" literally. (doubt it, though) In that case you're right. There's no singing in a song without vocals.......
Last edited by Elintasokas at Mar 11, 2015,
#8
Quote by HotspurJr


eg, let's say you're in the key of G, and your stressed note that you're trying to harmonize is a C.

Sticking with diatonic chords, your obvious choices to harmonize this are a C major chord, an A minor chord, or an F#dim chord, since those chords all contain a C note. (You could go non diatonic and include a F major chord, which would be a common choice, too). Which of those you pick will depend on what supports the emotional experience of the melody.




thanks , i wanted to hear this , so i can use any chord that contain the note , and choose the perfect one depending on the feeling that i want to express . really helpful .

you great

.................

and thanks everybody ,

if anyone knows a great book that i can read for this , please write the name to me .. thanks again .

.....................
#9
The function of the chord plays a role when it comes to harmonizing melodies. I usually hear the obvious harmony choices immediately, but like others have said, there is usually more than one viable choice.

Also, if you want to get the most out of music theory books (or pretty much anything at all), you have to be pretty good at reading music. So start sight singing and memorizing note names and intervals on the lines Maybe sight reading too, so you can actually play the examples in the books in a timely manner.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Mar 11, 2015,
#10
Quote by Elintasokas
^ "I have no idea what I'm saying." lol.

Hey, c'mon now, keep it constructive please.
Si
#11
I know vocals are just a melody with lyrics and can be replaced with another instrument. I still believe playing the chords of a song isn't music anymore than going up and down the scales is (people are just going to ask you to "play me a song" either way). I meant that a melody should be first-priority and then the bassline. You shouldn't just have chords for the sake of having chords but as an extension of the overall song and its meaning. Like I said, atmosphere and melody are more important to me than conventional harmony and chord progressions (never understood why they're so important).
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#12
Quote by MaggaraMarine


The different E notes you can find on the fretboard are the same note in different octaves and different positions. I would suggest learning all note names. If we name all the notes on the low E string, we get E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#. Then the same notes repeat in another octave. There are 12 notes.

The 5th fret of the low E string is an A. It is the same note as the open A string. So you can play the same pitch in many different positions. This makes it a lot easier to play all around the fretboard. You don't need to move your hands all the time, you can stay in one position and you can reach most of the notes you want to play.



you right it's easier to stay in one position .. but , also i think when you move from a fret to the next , sound becomes thinner .. as well , when you move from thicker strings to the thinner ones .. which actually makes the same notes sound different or thinner with a different feeling all over the guitar , even if they're the same note . right ?!
#13
^One thing to note here is that octaves are pretty important for making everything sound good in the mix. If you play everything within the same octave, it gets cluttered and can sound messy. If you spread it out, like playing the chords one or even two octaves below the melody for example, you give everything more room to "breathe".
Quote by Jesus
Gaza Strip- home. At least it was before I fucked ereythang up...
#14
Quote by Oskar_becker
you right it's easier to stay in one position .. but , also i think when you move from a fret to the next , sound becomes thinner .. as well , when you move from thicker strings to the thinner ones .. which actually makes the same notes sound different or thinner with a different feeling all over the guitar , even if they're the same note . right ?!

Yeah, the same note played on a different string sounds a bit different. Thicker strings have a "thicker" tone. So by playing in a different position you can also change the sound a bit.

But it doesn't really matter that much. I think what matters more is how easy it is to play the melody in that position. Certain positions work better for certain melodies.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#15
Quote by RonaldPoe
MM, I agree with your suggestions (especially the second one) to an extent. In my opinion, conventional harmony (chord progressions and diatonic stuff) is bull crap! Scales aren't songs and chords aren't either (unless accompanied by a bassline or vocals). I'm more of a chaotic musical type who prefers melody and atmosphere over conventional harmony. You've got to let the melodies speak and express themselves. I personally wouldn't bother trying to add chords to a melody for the sake of it. I'm not trolling (I try to be honest and polite both online and in person) but giving my perspective on this (this is how I feel).

It's also a good idea to use a computer to write melodies and see how they interact (this can be very interesting and provide alternative methods for harmony). Once again I'm not trolling (or trying to troll). Have a nice day.


Yeah I totally agree with Ronald. Although I should add that the important point is what kind of learner you are. Me i'm a self learner, that means i learn while playing and jamming with others, but mostly through internet.

That being said, you must have some discipline, meaning you must find a good equilibrium between technical, and fundamental practice and free expression on your instruments, where you're actually releasing the pressure and letting your heart express itself.

What I find very effective, is to learn from artists that inspire you. Learn their technique, their licks, but most importantly learn them then make them yours by changing them, adding in some original licks that you came up with.

In the end, it all sums up in how much effort you put your practice, because you can't expect to be good when you're considering playing guitar as side hobbie!

#16
Quote by RonaldPoe
I know vocals are just a melody with lyrics and can be replaced with another instrument. I still believe playing the chords of a song isn't music anymore than going up and down the scales is (people are just going to ask you to "play me a song" either way). I meant that a melody should be first-priority and then the bassline. You shouldn't just have chords for the sake of having chords but as an extension of the overall song and its meaning. Like I said, atmosphere and melody are more important to me than conventional harmony and chord progressions (never understood why they're so important).

You understand that melody and bassline together pretty much create a chord progression? It's just two notes, but it's all about context. You hear those notes as part of a chord. Chords just help us with figuring out what is happening and where everything is going.

Even if you have a single melody line, you can still hear chords behind it. It depends on the melody of course. If it's just one note all the time, it's pretty likely that you won't hear any chords behind it. But if the melody is like C E G F D B C G E C, that's only chord tones, and you'll also hear the melody as C major, G7, C major. You don't need to add anything to it to make it sound like that. You can of course harmonize it differently and make it sound pretty different. And you can do that with bassline only. For example play an A behind the C E G, and it will sound like Am7 chord.

You don't need to think in chords if you don't want to. And when it comes to your own music, I don't think it even makes sense (because your music always sounds so chaotic) - it doesn't sound like there are any chords so thinking in them just makes no sense. Not all music has chords in it.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#17
Another thing guys i want to ask about ,is .. what makes pop music a pop music or jazz a jazz etc..

is it the type of instrument that determining it or every type of music has its specific scales , someone clarify this to me , how can i differentiate between types of music ? in order to describe the music that i'm playing and say this music is rock , metal or whatever ..
#18
Quote by Oskar_becker
Another thing guys i want to ask about ,is .. what makes pop music a pop music or jazz a jazz etc..

is it the type of instrument that determining it or every type of music has its specific scales , someone clarify this to me , how can i differentiate between types of music ? in order to describe the music that i'm playing and say this music is rock , metal or whatever ..

The timber of the instruments, the types of chords and the rhythm have the most to do with it. But you can deviate in some of these categories without switching genre. I would say the most important is rhythm.

You seem at a beginner phase where you don't understand how chords and scales work. It's not really so much what you think it is afaict.

If you learn the roman numerals, and understand the key, what diatonic means, then a lot will suddenly become more clear to you.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Mar 13, 2015,
#19
Quote by Oskar_becker
Another thing guys i want to ask about ,is .. what makes pop music a pop music or jazz a jazz etc..

is it the type of instrument that determining it or every type of music has its specific scales , someone clarify this to me , how can i differentiate between types of music ? in order to describe the music that i'm playing and say this music is rock , metal or whatever ..

You'll figure out which songs belong to which genres by just listening a lot of music and finding similar sounding artists - those usually belong to the same genre or subgenre. It has little to do with scales or anything like that. Major and minor scales are used in every genre.

It has a lot to do with arrangement. Listen to some Andy Rehfeldt and you'll understand - he makes all kinds of funny versions of songs. For example the "smooth jazz" version of Enter Sandman. Or the reggae version of Children of the Grave. Or all the stupid "Radio Disney" versions of black and death metal songs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBmM79YadYM


But yeah, I would just suggest listening to a lot of music. I think Youtube has all kinds of playlists. Just type "[insert a genre] playlist" on Youtube search and listen to some of it. This should give you at least some kind of picture of how different genres sound like.

What makes a genre a genre? Well, you just need enough artists that sound kind of similar. That's how a new genre is born - many bands start playing similar sounding music. For example bands like Black Sabbath started playing bluesy music but added more distortion to the guitar sound and played heavier riffs and started singing about dark subjects. That's how metal was born. Then other bands took that style and started experimenting with it. That's how the different subgenres of metal were born. This is also why death metal and glam metal are both the same genre - they sound really different but they both had the same ancestors. When something becomes different enough, it starts a whole new genre. And that's what Black Sabbath did. They played something that wasn't blues, jazz or rock or any other genre.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#20
Quote by MaggaraMarine
You'll figure out which songs belong to which genres by just listening a lot of music and finding similar sounding artists - those usually belong to the same genre or subgenre. It has little to do with scales or anything like that. Major and minor scales are used in every genre.

It has a lot to do with arrangement. Listen to some Andy Rehfeldt and you'll understand - he makes all kinds of funny versions of songs. For example the "smooth jazz" version of Enter Sandman. Or the reggae version of Children of the Grave. Or all the stupid "Radio Disney" versions of black and death metal songs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBmM79YadYM


But yeah, I would just suggest listening to a lot of music. I think Youtube has all kinds of playlists. Just type "[insert a genre] playlist" on Youtube search and listen to some of it. This should give you at least some kind of picture of how different genres sound like.

What makes a genre a genre? Well, you just need enough artists that sound kind of similar. That's how a new genre is born - many bands start playing similar sounding music. For example bands like Black Sabbath started playing bluesy music but added more distortion to the guitar sound and played heavier riffs and started singing about dark subjects. That's how metal was born. Then other bands took that style and started experimenting with it. That's how the different subgenres of metal were born. This is also why death metal and glam metal are both the same genre - they sound really different but they both had the same ancestors. When something becomes different enough, it starts a whole new genre. And that's what Black Sabbath did. They played something that wasn't blues, jazz or rock or any other genre.


That video was great.