#1
Hey guys, I'm in dire need of assistance with my acoustic.
It's not exactly mine (friend let me use it since he doesn't play anymore) but the bridge is sticking out like crazy. When he gave me the guitar it was like that a little bit I think but now I start to hear cracks on the body and I can see them developing too. Is there anything I can do to fix this? Is it even possible to fix anymore? I read up and apparently it's because the strings on it were changed, I know he replaced all the strings a while ago when his G string snapped. Could someone clarify why this happened?

I've attached some pictures of what it looks like, hope you guys can help :s
Attachments:
DSC_0178.JPG
DSC_0175.JPG
Last edited by choppyshrimp5 at Mar 11, 2015,
#2
humidity is very important with acoustic guitars. You can get all sorts of humidifiers from various stores like bestbuy or walmart to special ones made by guitar companies.

if it's around the area the body and neck join those are the worst places the guitar can crack

Anything cosmetic I wouldn't worry as long as you're making music. Now if it was a martin , taylor, gibson or something in the 1000 dollar/pound range than I'd worry. Interesting fact there is now guitars made from composite materials like rainsong and so forth that do not need humidity. But they are very expensive. The good news is this doesn't happen much with electric guitars that are bolt on.

hope I could help
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Mar 12, 2015,
#3
This has nothing to do with humidity.

If you have a guitar and the bridge starts to lift a bit, you need to take it to a really good guitar tech immediately. If you keep trying to tune it to pitch, you'll simply keep breaking the guitar more and more, and this is what's happened with your guitar. Take the strings off immediately and take the guitar (or ship the guitar) to a guitar tech who specializes in these sort of repairs. Essentially, he'll glue the bridge down, but he might take further steps to insure that the bridge doesn't pull off again.

Strings are often replaced on these guitars; they're designed to handle that just fine. In fact, it's best to change strings on an acoustic on a regular basis, just as it is on an electric. I've got an acoustic with this style of bridge (a Martin) that was built in 1967, and it's still in good shape. If I ever see anything like this *beginning*, I'd have that guitar off to a repair guy (strings off) immediately.
#4
it could be a number of reasons why,

how i would fix it,
take strings of
push bridge down to orginal position
tape around the edges whit paper tape, the tape is so you can put it back in the right position
take bridge completely of (do this whit care)
sand the glue surface a little (or use a chissel) so you get a even surface
use PUR glue or something equally strong
place bridge white paper tape position
clamp down and let glue dry

if you use the correct glue it will never break in that place again.
Last edited by Vincesax at Mar 12, 2015,
#5
Quote by dspellman
This has nothing to do with humidity.

If you have a guitar and the bridge starts to lift a bit, you need to take it to a really good guitar tech immediately. If you keep trying to tune it to pitch, you'll simply keep breaking the guitar more and more, and this is what's happened with your guitar. Take the strings off immediately and take the guitar (or ship the guitar) to a guitar tech who specializes in these sort of repairs. Essentially, he'll glue the bridge down, but he might take further steps to insure that the bridge doesn't pull off again.

Strings are often replaced on these guitars; they're designed to handle that just fine. In fact, it's best to change strings on an acoustic on a regular basis, just as it is on an electric. I've got an acoustic with this style of bridge (a Martin) that was built in 1967, and it's still in good shape. If I ever see anything like this *beginning*, I'd have that guitar off to a repair guy (strings off) immediately.


So would you say it's too late to fix now? I'm not sure how to take off the strings so I just completely loosened them all until I take it over to see if it can be repaired first hand. There are some visible cracks but they aren't anything too major, it's just been lifted quite a bit as you can see in the pictures :s

What sign would show that it's beyond fixing?
#6
Quote by choppyshrimp5
So would you say it's too late to fix now? I'm not sure how to take off the strings so I just completely loosened them all until I take it over to see if it can be repaired first hand. There are some visible cracks but they aren't anything too major, it's just been lifted quite a bit as you can see in the pictures :s

What sign would show that it's beyond fixing?

You can get some clamps and some titebond wood glue and go at it yourself.

Depending on the brand/model of guitar it might not be worth fixing if more than just the bridge is breaking
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#7
Quote by choppyshrimp5
So would you say it's too late to fix now? I'm not sure how to take off the strings so I just completely loosened them all until I take it over to see if it can be repaired first hand. There are some visible cracks but they aren't anything too major, it's just been lifted quite a bit as you can see in the pictures :s

What sign would show that it's beyond fixing?


It's not beyond fixing; almost anything wood is fixable until it hits the chipper. The bridge was evidently glued on well enough; it just pulled up some of the guitar's top wood when it lifted. Mostly that's going to be glued, possibly reinforced.

Cracks in the guitar separate from the bridge lifting like that are another story; they may need gluing as well, but they *are* an indication that the guitar has been kept in very low humidity, and you'll want to consider how you're going to remedy as well. See if you can find videos relating to Bob Taylor (of Taylor guitars) and humidity. He has a series on getting guitars re-humidified (sometimes cracks due to humidity will largely close up).
#8
Good advice above. Titebond is the glue to use. Just glue it back where it was and get a few clamps to hold it in place (put some thin pieces of towel between the guitar and the clamps to protect the body ) Let it sit in a nice dry warm place for a few days (I'd go a week to be sure). Should be good. I had something similar happen years ago to a Guild acoustic. I did the above and it's been good for a lot of years.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Mar 12, 2015,
#9
Unless they've changed the past few years, guitars are mostly put together with hide glue, which will soften and let go if heated. That's why you should ever leave a guitar in a car trunk all day in July...This is what happens.

Typical wood glue could be used, but if you ever have to take it off and work on it again, it will rip wood off.

Replacing a bridge

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/Luthier/Technique/Guitar/Bridges/ReglueBr/regluebr1.html

Using hide glue

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/Luthier/Data/Materials/hideglue.html

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/Luthier/Technique/Glue/UseHideGlue/usehideglue1.html

In some cases the top of the guitar soundboard will be warped, when the bridge starts pulling up it will also cause a hump in the soundboard. Not easy to fix, I think he might have an article about that too.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#10
Having glued it back on as suggested, there may be separations that haven't been glued back together, leaving the top weak. I would therefore make a strong bridge plate that goes between the string balls and the guitar top. This might kill the sound a bit, but it will reinforce the potentially weak areas.