Page 1 of 2
#1
I was watching a Kirk Hammett interview recently where he explained how he first got into guitar. He explained how he had bought one, but never really put much effort into it, so he stuffed it in the closet. He then watched this Hendrix movie and that sparked a flame in him to dust off that guitar and master it. He explained how it was a long process and that he taught himself everything. That caught my attention, which made me wonder, "how did these guys back in the day master the guitar without any guidance, let alone no YouTube, tab pro, etc?" I mean, you'd think he would sound like crap, but hey, he's the lead for Metallica now. So what's the secret? Were these guys just gifted? I know that none of them picked up a guitar and learned to shred right off the bat, but it still fascinates me how the people who taught themselves how to play are the most successful guitar players in the world.
#2
They're normal people who practised their instrument. You only get out how much you put in.
#3
Quote by vayne92
They're normal people who practised their instrument. You only get out how much you put in.


Yes, but how did they master something if they had no guidance?
#4
With practice. Guidance isn't necessary. Ask any of the countless number of self taught musicians out there.

Also, I'm pretty sure Kirk Hammett took lessons from Joe Satriani. Like, back in the day when Satch wasn't famous yet, and was working as a teacher. Definitely feel like I've heard that before, lots of times.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
Last edited by the_bi99man at Mar 12, 2015,
#5
Quote by Granata
Yes, but how did they master something if they had no guidance?


You don't need someone to guide you. You can guide yourself. It's what myself and countless others have done.
#6
Perseverance and passion. And probably books that teach some chord basics, I'm pretty sure they did exist back then. Anyway you dont need a teacher to learn guitar but it does take more effort that way. You may/will also pick up bad habits and since you have no one to guide you you may bang your head against the wall for long time before you realize something is wrong.

ESP LTD F-50 + Tonezone
Cort EVL-Z4 + X2N
Cort EVL-K47B

Marshall Valvestate 8100
Randall RG1503
Bugera 333
Peavey Rockmaster preamp

Line6 Pod X3
#7
Quote by Granata
I was watching a Kirk Hammett interview recently where he explained how he first got into guitar. He explained how he had bought one, but never really put much effort into it, so he stuffed it in the closet. He then watched this Hendrix movie and that sparked a flame in him to dust off that guitar and master it. He explained how it was a long process and that he taught himself everything. That caught my attention, which made me wonder, "how did these guys back in the day master the guitar without any guidance, let alone no YouTube, tab pro, etc?" I mean, you'd think he would sound like crap, but hey, he's the lead for Metallica now. So what's the secret? Were these guys just gifted? I know that none of them picked up a guitar and learned to shred right off the bat, but it still fascinates me how the people who taught themselves how to play are the most successful guitar players in the world.



Kirk Hammett isnt the best example to use here as like the other posters said he was tutored by Joe Satriani as were quite a list of well established guitarists.

I know Dimebag Darrell couldnt play for toffee when he first started then he basically locked himself away for a entire summer break from school and mastered eruption by Van Halen with constant practice and i do mean constant practice.

So in short practice practice practice.
#8
They had guidance, they had the records of the musicians they liked. They picked up the guitar and started imitating their heroes from the records. It is a loot like learning to speak your native language (in my opinion). You didn't use Youtube or books on learning how to speak, you tried imitating people who could already speak (your parents and relatives) on a daily basis, and doing so you developed technique in regards to speech and fluency in regards to speech. This is how people learned to play music back in the day, and it is very related to styles such as jazz and blues, that have a very aural tradition when it comes to learning music.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Last edited by Sickz at Mar 12, 2015,
#9
They also had less distractions than people nowadays do (video games, social media/internet, Netflix...). They couldn't go on UG to overanalyze their gear choices etc.
#10
Quote by Jyrgen
They also had less distractions than people nowadays do (video games, social media/internet, Netflix...). They couldn't go on UG to overanalyze their gear choices etc.

Thats a good answer.Video games and ofcourse work is my distractions regarding playing.
#11
Quote by Jyrgen
They also had less distractions than people nowadays do (video games, social media/internet, Netflix...). They couldn't go on UG to overanalyze their gear choices etc.



That is the unfortunate truth. We have so much shit to do that its hard for a self-learning guitarist to really improve their playing, if you lack self control that is.

ESP LTD F-50 + Tonezone
Cort EVL-Z4 + X2N
Cort EVL-K47B

Marshall Valvestate 8100
Randall RG1503
Bugera 333
Peavey Rockmaster preamp

Line6 Pod X3
#12
To succeed back then was harder and took more desire, but this often lead to more passion for the instrument and more reward.

There simply weren`t the resources around that we have these days. Even just 15 years ago when I started learning, the internet wasn`t really about and it certainly didn`t have what we have these days.

I just had a crusty old book full of songs I never heard of and it didnt even come with a cd or tape so how the hell was I supposed to know how they should sound!

These songs were traditional or classical reworkings such as`Jesu, joy of man`s desiring`. I only wanted to learn Nirvana at the time! It took so much effort and time to find out what power chords were but once I got it I was like `wow`.

I reckon the frustrations made me a better guitarist in the long run. These days learning an instrument is a different world away - although don`t let anyone tell you it`s easy. It`s still tough for anyone starting out.
Get a free copy of my eBook at Guitar Domination


If there is something to be changed in this world, then it can happen through music.
Jimi Hendrix
#13
Quote by Granata
Yes, but how did they master something if they had no guidance?



I think if you need guidance to develop something on your own, you're never going to be really original

I never had any lessons, watched any YouTube videos or any of that stuff. I love it when I meet people who teach guitar and they go and tell me ,, you have to hold your pick like this'' or anything like that and later on, I can pretty much blow them away within the first 10 notes I play. Figuring out the way to play things the way that feels right to YOU and not to others is the best way in may opinion.

People today are way too focused on their theories and their lessons, they forget to be original and to set personal aims.

You don't need guidance, you need the will and the creativity to practise and compose.
Error 404 - Signature not available.
#14
Of course you need guidance. Guidance doesn't mean you do exactly as someone else tell you to do. If you think that, you have a very strange idea of teaching. A good teacher is there to guide, help through obstacles and give advice - not to tell the student what to do. In the end, no-one goes completely on their own. But that guidance can come from as different things as just listening to music, just watching someone play or get instruction from a teacher.

Not even the person who were the first playing the electric guitar went completely on their own - they studied players on the acoustic and went from there.

To answer TS question, it probably didn't take longer to understand something back then than it does now. Just because the information is available, it doesn't mean you can use it. Music is more akin to a language than anything else - you need to hear it, take it in and mimic it, learn how it sounds before you can create it. Technique is a very small part in playing an instrument. Understanding the notes and to learn how they sound in combination with other notes and chords before playing them is what takes time.
"Your signature can not be longer than 250 characters."

How you know you have too many guitars...

Apparently once also known as PonyFan #834553.
#15
Imitation. Copping licks off tapes and records.

It's still the best way to learn.

They also played with others and picked things up from one another. Mini lessons.
Last edited by Virgman at Mar 12, 2015,
#16
Persistence is and was the key.

Yngwie got obsessed from an early age and Hendrix is a pretty great inspiration that not only took him but also Satriani to pick up a guitar.

The thing with Henrix is you can hear it or see it once and it feels 100% inspiring even on an of night.

As for Kirk yes he did take lessons form Satriani. He would even ride on a bycycle all the way. He heard that other players were getting super chops almost over night. Hey got to check it out.

But before the internet it was more of connecting to other players to learn and then practise until you got it down. Then going form one to the other to learn and improve.

Cliff Burton outgrew 3 teachers on the way. But he decided to commit to being a bass player and a musician. When you commit then you look for the answers and no one can stop you. Kirk wanted to be the best and he was great enough to catch the ears of Ulrich and Hetfield to replace Mustaine.
#17
Waiting for the next issue of Guitar Player magazine to come in the mail. It had some tabs and lessons in there

Also going to the music shops and hanging out, reading all the info and music sheets, learning from others there

and there was just as much other stuff to do back then, having a video game etc now makes no difference at all
Last edited by Tempoe at Mar 12, 2015,
#18
The thing is it was exactly the same back then as it is now.

Sure resources are a lot easier to come by but at the end of the day nothing's changed. The guitar still won't learn itself, you still have to follow the same old principles of dilligence, focus and hard work. Practicing is still the same - it's just easier to find out the the hows and whys of practicing. Likewise the reasons people suck at guitar are the exact same reasons people sucked 30 years ago, not practicing enough, not listening properly, not being self-critical enough, not being prepared to stick out the "boring stuff".

Like others have pointed out the wealth of information we have nowadays is, in many ways, counter-productive. You have players expecting to just be able to play complicated stuff from the outset, or obsessing over irrelevant minutiae like changing pickups before they've even got the hang of the most basic of things on the instrument,
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#19
Quote by Oh_My_Goth
I think if you need guidance to develop something on your own, you're never going to be really original

I never had any lessons, watched any YouTube videos or any of that stuff. I love it when I meet people who teach guitar and they go and tell me ,, you have to hold your pick like this'' or anything like that and later on, I can pretty much blow them away within the first 10 notes I play. Figuring out the way to play things the way that feels right to YOU and not to others is the best way in may opinion.

People today are way too focused on their theories and their lessons, they forget to be original and to set personal aims.

You don't need guidance, you need the will and the creativity to practise and compose.


Well guidance as in if you're doing the techniques properly. That's what I meant.

Loving the responses on this page. And yeah, Kirk might have been the wrong example. Clapton is a better example. Self taught, and how many has he influenced? Holy cow.
#20
Quote by Granata
Loving the responses on this page. And yeah, Kirk might have been the wrong example. Clapton is a better example. Self taught, and how many has he influenced? Holy cow.


Thing is, he may not have been formally taught... but he would still have been copping licks and song structures and all the rest of it from the musicians he grew up listening to, the real old-guard blues players like Blind Lemon Jefferson, Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, and so on.

Also I would contend that a lot of the older players who are about as close to self-taught as you can get really don't have particularly amazing technique. Saying nothing about their music, just that they're really not playing anything massively physically demanding.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#21
Quote by Jyrgen
They also had less distractions than people nowadays do (video games, social media/internet, Netflix...). They couldn't go on UG to overanalyze their gear choices etc.


LOL
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#22
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr


Also I would contend that a lot of the older players who are about as close to self-taught as you can get really don't have particularly amazing technique. Saying nothing about their music, just that they're really not playing anything massively physically demanding.


That's a good point, also. Opinions about musicality and whatnot aside, that's just a fact that the vast majority of the "old greats" don't actually have very good technique, or play particularly technical music, by the standards set by modern virtuosos.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#23
When I was 5 I picked up my uncle's Silvertone aco9ustic and started banging on it same as any 5 year old kid will. He walked in....BUSTED...he told me if I wanted to play it, play it right. I said I didn't know how, he said he'd show me. So he showed me 3 chords. By the time the weekend was over I was playing an old traditional ditty, Little Brown Jug. Not well, but playing it...

From then on when we made trips to the grandparents' house he and his brother showed me the rest of the open chords, I started playing songs with them, mostly 50's and country stuff, they were Everly Brothers fans, by age 8 I was ready to jump in on anything they played and learn it.

Someone showed me a barre chord, I was about 10 I guess, I figured it out from there myself. I would listen to the radio and try to learn songs that way but it was tedious, not many were in tune the same. The tape machines in use in the 60's ran at different speeds a lot of the time, when they transferred from one to another the result was a little faster or slower, and the tuning was off. The Beatles in one case decided a song was a little fast so one of them sat there with his thumb on the tape slowing it down just a bit...according to an article I read a long time ago. So that one was out of tune...

So that meant retuning every time, same for records, but I could play the record over again. I had to sit there and wait for it to play on the radio, so I'd play slightly out of tune and try to ignore it. Not easy...I'd pick up part of a song, wait till it played again, get a little more, and so forth. Same for getting lyrics. Write down whatever I could, wait for it to play on the radio again. Write down a little more. IN 2 or 3 days I'd get all the words I could figure out.

At one time I got a chord book or two, but by that time I already knew what most of the commonly used ones were, and had figured out the tendon injury to the ring finger of my left hand wouldn't let me play a lot of them, my fingers just wouldn't go there.

I learned leads basically the same way, a little at a time listening to radio, cassettes and records. Also watching other guitar players, I'd see something and try to do it myself if I liked it. Saw Roy Clark, Glen Campbell and Jose Feliciano do lots of stuff I couldn't even think about...

I started learning slide because of Duanne Allman, Statesboro Blues. Didn't havee a slide bar, or a bottle that would fit, so I used a Zippo lighter holding it between middle and ring finger. Same way, pick out a little of a song, try it again next time I could catch it on radio, and I learned to memorize stuff pretty fast...in high school band I memorized everything we did, marching band, concert band and jazz band.

When I was about 21 or 22 I wondered how people like Feleciano, Ray Charles and Stevie Wonder could play at all completely blind, and wanted to be able to watch the audience too, instead of the guitar neck, so I practiced in the dark for 2 years or a little more. Totally dark, can't see your hand a foot away. Pretty much sucked at first but it didn't take long until I could play songs I knew pretty well, and started learning new ones in the dark. That helped a lot, I highly recommend practicing in the dark for a couple of years.

It was different, the internet didn't exist yet, I had been playing over 30 years when I saw my first computer. We had a few resources, chord books, a couple of magazines like Hit Parader published some song lyrics, and they weren't always accurate. The local library occasionally had a few things on the technical side, if you wanted to learn how to build guitars, and playing sax in high school band helped a lot too, but 90% of what I do I taught myself. Get the record or cassette, play it 328 times until I could play along...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Mar 12, 2015,
#24
Quote by smittyanthrax
Kirk Hammett isnt the best example to use here as like the other posters said he was tutored by Joe Satriani as were quite a list of well established guitarists.

I know Dimebag Darrell couldnt play for toffee when he first started then he basically locked himself away for a entire summer break from school and mastered eruption by Van Halen with constant practice and i do mean constant practice.

So in short practice practice practice.


Amen to that. And what an interesting summer break that must have been!
A guitar is a very personal extension of the person playing it. You have to be emotionally and spiritually connected to your instrument - Eddie Van Halen
#25
Back in the day they would go to their gigs and physically watch how they played. Followed them about. They toured in smaller areas geographically. Then you had the advent of TV too and music videos/live performance but from what they are saying, they watch them and learned piecemeal. However I bet most realized if they where good enough to do that they could do their own stuff too.
Dean MAB1. Epiphone Annihilation V. EVH 5150III. Orange PPC112. Earthquaker devices - The Warden, Arrows, Acapulco Gold, Levitation, Night Wire. TS9, DD3, GE7, NS2, LS2, Polytune mini, Small Stone. SM57. Focusrite. LINUX!
#26
i learned any way i could. watched others, asked ?s, found a book or two. it certainly wasn't like today i guess you actually had to put some effort into finding out. i remember finding a new book "The Heavy Guitar Bible" which had this new thing called tab (still have that book). of course geting a teacher was always an option.

progress was definitely slower but i managed to muddle through. i still stare at fingers whenever i see someone playing making mental notes.
#27
The internet is certainly a powerful tool for learning anything, but even still, I did not learn improv via the internet. I only learned by playing with other people and generally practicing the instrument for hours on end. Same with speed or any other technique. 90% of it came from just practicing the instrument until fingers bled. No amount of internets can substitute for this, and musicians have had access to practice since the dawn of time.
#28
Well, being one of those old dudes that picked up guitar in the 60s I can say listening to vinyl hour after hour, watching the fingers of those that were better, lessons, and a few books were most of the methods available. There was a saying back then among blues players: "take what you need and make it your own" so it was cool to learn others licks but not cool to rip whole songs off note for note. Take the basics and then create something entirely new was the challenge. That is why music of that era often sounded so fresh and creative.

Many top players of that era can play some pretty amazingly technical stuff (Glenn Campbell, Tommy Tedesco) but most feel that the current craze of hyper-focus on technical skill sorta misses the point. Most of them would say guitar is about musical expression, and guys like Malmsteen are highly skilled technicians without much to say musically. A difference in style and focus I suppose.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#29
Quote by Cajundaddy
Well, being one of those old dudes that picked up guitar in the 60s I can say listening to vinyl hour after hour, watching the fingers of those that were better, lessons, and a few books were most of the methods available. There was a saying back then among blues players: "take what you need and make it your own" so it was cool to learn others licks but not cool to rip whole songs off note for note. Take the basics and then create something entirely new was the challenge. That is why music of that era often sounded so fresh and creative.

Many top players of that era can play some pretty amazingly technical stuff (Glenn Campbell, Tommy Tedesco) but most feel that the current craze of hyper-focus on technical skill sorta misses the point. Most of them would say guitar is about musical expression, and guys like Malmsteen are highly skilled technicians without much to say musically. A difference in style and focus I suppose.


good point about "stealing" licks. i certainly did a lot of that but as you said used them in a different context and came up with something of my own. one thing that was told to me when i started to play by a guy i really respected was "no one ever got famous by sounding like everyone else" i took that to heart and have always strived to have my own tone and playing style (more or less) i suck at copying others songs note for note as i'd rather put my own spin on them.
#30
Quote by Cajundaddy
Most of them would say guitar is about musical expression, and guys like Malmsteen are highly skilled technicians without much to say musically.


I would disagree with this statement. Intensely. Further, I would contend that making any such statement indicates, more than anything else, that you're just not on the same wavelength as they are (which is fine, please don't take that negatively); saying that anyone has nothing to say musically is a very dangerous statement.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#31
I'm also self-taught from the '60s, a folkie, done by talking to my equally-incompetent mates and listening to vinyl and tape. No aids like slow down or loops. I had had some piano lesson a few years before, so I knew a bit of theory. I used song books, and thought that the Mel Bay birdcages were the final answer to arrangements. - One of the worst mistakes I ever made was not thinking about alternate chord voicings in those early years. I am, however, proud of the fact that I learned alternating bass fingerpicking without any help at all, just by listening.

I think a lot of shredding is just being clever for the sake of it, and sterile, but each to his own. The jazz, latin and flamenco players are the ones who really leave me gob-smacked as far as technical skills are concerned.
#32
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I would disagree with this statement. Intensely. Further, I would contend that making any such statement indicates, more than anything else, that you're just not on the same wavelength as they are (which is fine, please don't take that negatively); saying that anyone has nothing to say musically is a very dangerous statement.


I have nothing to say musically

LOOPHOLE

Seriously, though, I like malmsteen. I don't see that he doesn't have any feel, his vibrato is one of the best (IMO).

At the same time I can kind of understand the "missing the point" argument as well. Any time I see one of those hardcore shredders who can rip through sweep arpeggios at a million miles an hour but who has terrible vibrato and sounds like a metronome I can't help but feel that they've been concentrating on the wrong things in practice sessions.

Don't get me wrong, if they can let rip at superspeed but also sound ultramusical and have killer vibrato, feel and touch etc. then they're awesome. That's the ideal (for me, anyway). I'd rather have feel than chops if I had to pick, but even more I'd rather have both.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#33
This is why I like Guthrie Govan. He's ridiculously technical yet plays with loads of musicality at the same time.
#34
Eric Johnson...nuff said...

OK seriously though...Johnson is one that can play fast as hell and definitely musical too. Incredibly fast picker and usually follows a melody line too. Roy Clark was one of my favorites in the 60's and 70's, incredible musician, Glen Campbell, Jose Feliciano...All could play really fast, Roy Clark could probably play any style you can name, plus several other instruments.

Say what you want about shredders...this is some killer guitar...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhiKgeJV3k0
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#36
I used to watch Roy Clark and try to figure out how the hell he did some of the stuff he played. He was a regular on Hee Haw, a show I hated but watched just to see Roy play...He had one of the fastest right hands I've ever seen. And a decent comic too. Go through the playlist to the right and watch a few of his other vids. Amazing player no matter what style you're into. Definitely watch " The Great Pretender" and "12th Street Rag".
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#37
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I would disagree with this statement. Intensely. Further, I would contend that making any such statement indicates, more than anything else, that you're just not on the same wavelength as they are (which is fine, please don't take that negatively); saying that anyone has nothing to say musically is a very dangerous statement.


Hey everybody is entitled to their opinion and there is no accounting for taste. I don't think expressing an opinion will start WWIII or the next Jihad though so I'm not sure how "dangerous" it is. Still a free country after all. There are a lot of famous writers and painters I don't appreciate either. Choosing what you do/don't like is not a crime. Plenty of players here don't care for the "Dad rock" guys I listen to but I try not to take that personally. We like what we like.

There are lots of highly technical players that move me as a musician including Satch and Guthrie G. but Yingwie just annoys. I'd rather listen to almost any other guitarist. If you dig his stuff... cool, enjoy!
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Mar 19, 2015,
#38
Yea, Yngwie annoys me as well. I can only listen to him in short bursts. The endless phrygian wanking gets old pretty quick. I still love his tone and the smoothness of his playing style, and can appreciate his talent as a musician.
#39
hi there,

here we go:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQXEjMNYjt2xGfZmkbFzsMXTrGofSgB_P

this is a video-series from Troy Grady called 'Cracking The Code' where he talks in Detail, enriched by beautiful Animations & Artwork how he becomes the great guitar player he is now. back in the days w/o computers etc..
it is a bit funny, very interesting and helpful as well!

it's free, so give it a shot highly recommended

(hadn't the time to scan the forum, so i hope the series wasn't posted already...)
#40
Quote by Dave_Mc
I have nothing to say musically

LOOPHOLE

Seriously, though, I like malmsteen. I don't see that he doesn't have any feel, his vibrato is one of the best (IMO).

At the same time I can kind of understand the "missing the point" argument as well. Any time I see one of those hardcore shredders who can rip through sweep arpeggios at a million miles an hour but who has terrible vibrato and sounds like a metronome I can't help but feel that they've been concentrating on the wrong things in practice sessions.

Don't get me wrong, if they can let rip at superspeed but also sound ultramusical and have killer vibrato, feel and touch etc. then they're awesome. That's the ideal (for me, anyway). I'd rather have feel than chops if I had to pick, but even more I'd rather have both.


good points. personally i love yngwie but understand that if you don't get what he's trying to do musically then i t may seem souless. yngwie's playing speaks to me on a different level than say Peter green but both are great in their own way. you can find just as many clueless blues licks out there that are poorly played and don't work. oh and i spent much of my youth watching roy clark and buck owens as my grandparents seem to have hee haw on perpetually wen we visited. both are really good players just not really my style. still they have plenty to offer and are certainly worth listening to.
Page 1 of 2