#1
Hi everyone

I have an Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro and have recently had Alnico Bareknuckle Warpigs fitted in them. I was notified this was a bad idea (the combination choice not the pups themselves) but still I relented and went along.

They sound okay but are too muffly and with the LP it sounds pretty awful at low volumes. I play through a Laney GH50: but am waiting for an Orange OR100 to arrive any time soon (yippee!).

The music I play is metal/heavy rock, with a sludgy middy tone preferred but with some chug and bottom end.

I had a set of Seymour Duncan Blackouts on my previous guitar (Schecter Blackjack) and they sounded absolutely immense at low volumes (around 1-2 on the volume knob). Awesome at gig rehearsals too.

Just wanted to know - would the following pickups sound good (aka boosted) in an Epi Les Paul at the same low volumes also?

Seymour Duncan Distortion
Dimarzio Super Distortion

Or is it just because the Blackouts are active they sound boosted at low volume?

Please give your two cents before I go making any rash decisions. Cheers!
#2
Quote by m_wilkie
I have an Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro and have recently had Alnico Bareknuckle Warpigs fitted in them. I was notified this was a bad idea (the combination choice not the pups themselves)
I don't see how that could be a bad idea.

I mean, these p/ups are more often than not found in pointier guitars with which people play metal and such, but if you like the combo there's really nothing wrong or inadvisable.
Quote by m_wilkie
They sound okay but are too muffly and with the LP it sounds pretty awful at low volumes.
Meaning with the guitar volume down?
'cause that's how passive p/ups sound when paired with your everyday guitar electronics - when you turn the volume down you loose high frequencies.

Ever heard of eddy van halen saying something like "you don't need a tone control, the volume knob is the tone control"?
That's the reason he said that.
Quote by m_wilkie
The music I play is metal/heavy rock, with a sludgy middy tone preferred but with some chug and bottom end.
You need to clear your ideas a bit on this - sludge tones are usually fuzzy and have a pretty extended bass range, while chug stuff is usually tight.

So, do you want more bass or do you want less bass?
Quote by m_wilkie
I had a set of Seymour Duncan Blackouts on my previous guitar (Schecter Blackjack) and they sounded absolutely immense at low volumes (around 1-2 on the volume knob).
That's because blackouts are active p/ups, and they were paired with electronics that made them not loose high end when the volume was turned down.

You can modify your les paul's circuit a bit to have that with your current p/ups as well.
Quote by m_wilkie
Awesome at gig rehearsals too.
What's a gig rehearsal?

'cause if it's a rehearsal then I don't see why you wouldn't simply turn the amp volume down, and if it's the sound check at a gig then you definitely should keep everything at gig volume to let the sound guy adjust everything properly.
Quote by m_wilkie
Just wanted to know - would the following pickups sound good (aka boosted) in an Epi Les Paul at the same low volumes also?
Define how a p/up sounds "boosted" please.

Also again, it's a matter of the rest of the electronics.
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#3
Quote by Spambot_2

Meaning with the guitar volume down?


Amp volume. Guitar volume is always maxed (or very near abouts).

You need to clear your ideas a bit on this - sludge tones are usually fuzzy and have a pretty extended bass range, while chug stuff is usually tight.

So, do you want more bass or do you want less bass?


It's a bit difficult to describe - somewhere between thick sludge and thumpy, bottom heavy metal. Think Crowbar, Acid Bath, Mastodon, hell even Sabbath. Bands who are bottom heavy and all about the dirt, but can speed it up with clear, tight chugging at times. Basically I'm not looking for an Electric Wizard tone or a Megadeth tone.

That's because blackouts are active p/ups, and they were paired with electronics that made them not loose high end when the volume was turned down.

You can modify your les paul's circuit a bit to have that with your current p/ups as well.


Nice. I'll ask my guitar tech friend about this one, cheers.

What's a gig rehearsal?

'cause if it's a rehearsal then I don't see why you wouldn't simply turn the amp volume down, and if it's the sound check at a gig then you definitely should keep everything at gig volume to let the sound guy adjust everything properly.


Should've just said band rehearsal. We play looooooud but without diminishing the sound quality and destroying ear drums.

Define how a p/up sounds "boosted" please.

Also again, it's a matter of the rest of the electronics.


Not the pickup itself boosting, but the pickup pushing the tubes in the amp so it provides a quicker break up.

Thanks for your response.
#4
Quote by m_wilkie
Amp volume. Guitar volume is always maxed (or very near abouts).
So what, you mean the amp sounded a lot better at lower volumes when the guitar had different p/ups?

If it's simply this, adjust the amp's settings accordingly and turn the input gain up to compensate for the lowering of the guitar's output signal strength.
Quote by m_wilkie
Think Crowbar, Acid Bath, Mastodon, hell even Sabbath. Bands who are bottom heavy and all about the dirt, but can speed it up with clear, tight chugging at times.
These bands' guitar sounds are not even slightly tight.

You'll like your TH100.
Quote by m_wilkie
Nice. I'll ask my guitar tech friend about this one, cheers.
This though is about the guitar, not the amp, and the problem you're having is with your amp.
Quote by m_wilkie
Not the pickup itself boosting, but the pickup pushing the tubes in the amp so it provides a quicker break up.
Now define "quicker breakup" please.

Also turn the input gain up.
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#5
use an od pedal as a boost if you're playing at low volumes.
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#7
Quote by Spambot_2
So what, you mean the amp sounded a lot better at lower volumes when the guitar had different p/ups?

If it's simply this, adjust the amp's settings accordingly and turn the input gain up to compensate for the lowering of the guitar's output signal strength.

I've tried it on nearly every gain setting there is, including maxing it out all the way to 10. Same with the drive. Still nowhere near as gain-y as I would have hoped, especially for such high output pickups.

This though is about the guitar, not the amp, and the problem you're having is with your amp.

There is no problem with the amp here. Well, 99% sure anyway. I tried it with a rusty old Ibanez guitar last night and it still sounded louder and clearer than the Les Paul w/ Warpigs. I will wait until the Orange arrives though and see how it sounds then.

@Dave_Mc - Yep, was thinking that myself. May just get an MXR Micro Amp to give it that extra push.

@Grawgos - Will also have a tinker with that as well, good idea.
#8
I have a guitar with Blackouts and another with Black Winters, which are like hotter Duncan Distortions. I've heard Ola Englund describe them as "super" duncan distortions. They definitely sound good at lower volumes, like the Blackouts, because they're fairly bright. But if you liked the sound of Blackouts, I'd just get some of those.
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#9
What position is the Warpig hum in? Neck, bridge, or both? If you're experiencing the "muff"-iness with the neck position selected, that might be the issue. My experience with high-output pups is that they sound really thick and muddy (what you might be calling muff) on the neck position. Good for sludge but not for tightness. Rather, the bridge position would probably be better for tightness and clarity.

I haven't tried the Warpigs, so they might not work in the same way here or in your case. I am seeing that on Bareknuckle's Warpigs frequency chart (which may or may not be reliable) there is a fairly large difference in the treble output, quite a bit lower than the bass/mids output. And make sure both your volume and tone are rolled up.
Last edited by Will Lane at Mar 13, 2015,
#10
Quote by Grawgos
Have you tried messing with the pickup height?

This.

Or you could have a bad solder joint somewhere as well. Did you install the pickups yourself or did a shop do it?

Is the volume issue there with both the neck and bridge pickups? What about with both the Neck and Bridge selected?
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Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
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