#1
I had a friend of mine bother me about this for a few weeks. Since I'm no wood worker I thought I'd ask around here. Certain companies call the process "ebonizing" turning a piece of say rosewood black. It's completely esthetic as we know.

so the question is what works best. As in stays on longest. Gets that jet black look and no black fingers after playing.. that sort of thing. I've heard of
india ink
shoe polish
had terrible results with miniwax ebony stain

any photos or websites are also appreciated.
#2
Fiebings Black Leather Dye



Or "fretboard dye" from StewMac. Which is *ahem* Fiebings Black Leather Dye in a 4 oz bottle for $7.10
http://www.stewmac.com/Materials_and_Supplies/Finishing_Supplies/Colors_and_Tints_and_Stains/Black_Fingerboard_Stain.html



A How To:

http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Online_Resources/Finishing/For_ebony_streaks_use_black_fingerboard_stain.html

One caution: this stuff will wipe off real MOP inlays, but you might have to take a bit of care with the cheap "pearloid" plastic crap that Gibson uses on its $6000 guitars.
Last edited by dspellman at Mar 13, 2015,
#3
Quote by dspellman
Fiebings Black Leather Dye



Or "fretboard dye" from StewMac. Which is *ahem* Fiebings Black Leather Dye in a 4 oz bottle for $7.10
http://www.stewmac.com/Materials_and_Supplies/Finishing_Supplies/Colors_and_Tints_and_Stains/Black_Fingerboard_Stain.html



A How To:

http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Online_Resources/Finishing/For_ebony_streaks_use_black_fingerboard_stain.html

One caution: this stuff will wipe off real MOP inlays, but you might have to take a bit of care with the cheap "pearloid" plastic crap that Gibson uses on its $6000 guitars.


That's what I use. never had a problem with it staining plastic inlays. You just need to wipe it off quickly before it settles.



Guitar on the left is real ebony, guitar on the right is dyed.


BTW, the dye is really really strong. You need to be careful when you apply it or you'll have some nasty black spots bleeding over on your finish that are going to be a pain to remove.
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#4
Sorry to jump on your thread, but it's kinda relevant so there's not much point starting a new one.

I have an Ibanez RG and an Epiphone Explorer, both with fairly light coloured rosewood boards. Is there any way to darken them slightly without completely blackening them? Can that stain be thinned to get more of a translucent tint rather than a complete stain?
Last edited by CorrosionMedia at Mar 13, 2015,
#5
thanks for the heads up guys. I'll let my friend know.

the miniwax ebony dye made the fretboards slightly darker. Tons of fumes and for a white or cream binding it was turning it black on this LTD Viper baritone I had ages ago. But yeah the stewmac stuff I'm going to try.
#7
Quote by CorrosionMedia
Sorry to jump on your thread, but it's kinda relevant so there's not much point starting a new one.

I have an Ibanez RG and an Epiphone Explorer, both with fairly light coloured rosewood boards. Is there any way to darken them slightly without completely blackening them? Can that stain be thinned to get more of a translucent tint rather than a complete stain?


I'd go for raw linseed oil for a long lasting "tint" ... lemon oil works but it is more a conditioner so will lighten over time
#8
Quote by sytharnia1560
I'd go for raw linseed oil for a long lasting "tint" ... lemon oil works but it is more a conditioner so will lighten over time


Raw linseed oil would probably be the very last thing I'd use, and it wouldn't turn the rosewood anything but rosewood color. It's essentially a polymerizing wiping varnish, and one of the serious issues with raw linseed oil is that sometimes it elects to dry...never. This is why boiled linseed oil has been developed. Initially, boiled linseed oil was exactly that; heated linseed oil that became changed at a molecular level and would dry much more quickly. These days "boiled" linseed oil isn't heated, but is chemically treated. But it wouldn't be a great choice because it won't turn a rosewood fretboard black. Nor will lemon oil.
#9
Quote by dspellman
...it wouldn't be a great choice because it won't turn a rosewood fretboard black. Nor will lemon oil.

Yeah, that's what I was thinking. Mainly because when I got it, I gave it a good clean and oiled the fretboard. Still light.

Here's a pic of it now:


And here's how I'd like it to look (forgive the 2AM photoshopping. srs. plz):
#10
Quote by CorrosionMedia
Yeah, that's what I was thinking. Mainly because when I got it, I gave it a good clean and oiled the fretboard. Still light.

Here's a pic of it now:


And here's how I'd like it to look (forgive the 2AM photoshopping. srs. plz):



You could try a darker brown stain and see if that works out for you. Aside from that I don't think you'll be getting results you want (I.E. your board looking darker permanently) if you're just oiling the board etc...


Quote by Tallwood13
thanks for the heads up guys. I'll let my friend know.

the miniwax ebony dye made the fretboards slightly darker. Tons of fumes and for a white or cream binding it was turning it black on this LTD Viper baritone I had ages ago. But yeah the stewmac stuff I'm going to try.


Just don't buy it from stew mac. Fiebings is sold at like every shoe repair place for super cheap. Lasts a decent amount of time too. Heck I've dyed about 4 boards so far and I still have about half a bottle.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.