#1
I've had two questions in the past month or so that have resulted in different answers- perhaps my fellow forum-goers could shed some light on these issues?

The first is an issue with my new (to me) guitar. I love firebird-style guitars, and this Washburn Starfire (which DEFINITELY isn't meant to look ANYTHING like a Gibson Firebird) absolutely blew my mind for the price. Sounds great, looks snazzy...but the frets are killers. I've cut my hands up quite a bit. I took it to the shop, and the guy said "Just keep it in a humid room a couple days. It should correct itself."
I left it in my basement, with a crappy vaporizer for just a little added boost, and after four days, no change.
A veteran guitarist friend of mine said that the music store guy is full of it, and I should just get the frets buffed down.
But if the music store guy IS right and the neck expands when humidity increases, it might screw with my neck a bit.

And yesterday my musician friend told me I shouldn't use my Micro Terror (30 watt, tube base powered by solid-state power amp) with my 100 watt Marshall 4x12.
I've been meaning to save up for a Marshall head of some sort, but according to this guy, I'm damaging my cab and should get a higher wattage head as soon as humanly possible.
I asked the store guys about this, and they said they've never heard of any such problem.

I really don't know who to go with on these things. Any words of advice?
Custom-Built Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
Orange Rockerverb 50 Combo
#2
Quote by Mayge
I've had two questions in the past month or so that have resulted in different answers- perhaps my fellow forum-goers could shed some light on these issues?

The first is an issue with my new (to me) guitar. I love firebird-style guitars, and this Washburn Starfire (which DEFINITELY isn't meant to look ANYTHING like a Gibson Firebird) absolutely blew my mind for the price. Sounds great, looks snazzy...but the frets are killers. I've cut my hands up quite a bit. I took it to the shop, and the guy said "Just keep it in a humid room a couple days. It should correct itself."
I left it in my basement, with a crappy vaporizer for just a little added boost, and after four days, no change.
A veteran guitarist friend of mine said that the music store guy is full of it, and I should just get the frets buffed down.
But if the music store guy IS right and the neck expands when humidity increases, it might screw with my neck a bit.

And yesterday my musician friend told me I shouldn't use my Micro Terror (30 watt, tube base powered by solid-state power amp) with my 100 watt Marshall 4x12.
I've been meaning to save up for a Marshall head of some sort, but according to this guy, I'm damaging my cab and should get a higher wattage head as soon as humanly possible.
I asked the store guys about this, and they said they've never heard of any such problem.

I really don't know who to go with on these things. Any words of advice?


#1. music store guy is full of shit. Musician friend is correct. Frets sound like they need buffing.
#2. As long as the wattage of the cabinet is equal or greater than the wattage of the amp, you are ok. Just make sure you match the impedance.
#3
Get new advisors cause both of them are bozos. Have your frets dressed by a skilled luthier that the pros in your town use, and simply ignore the other guy cause hedon'tknowjack about amplifiers.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#4
The humidifier thing is true. It's called fret sprout. But putting it in your basement with a vaporizor probably won't do anything. It won't mess up your neck more than other various changes that happen throughout the year. The permanent fix is the file down the edges. But don't wait to do this. You have to do it when it's bad or else it's just going to happen again.

The only possible way to damage your speakers is if you push the amp into clipping. But that's only a problem in PAs as most solid-state guitar amps don't allow you to go past the clipping threshold. So using the Micro Terror with that cab is perfectly fine.
#5
^+1 Confirmation. Get your guitar set up by a professional luthier. It sounds like your frets need buffing and you need to set up the action. You don't want to exceed the speaker wattage rating by a higher wattage from the amp. So 30 watts going into a 100 watt speaker load is fine.
#6
I'll confirm all this once more, frets need dressing, 30 watt amp won't even think about hurting a 100 watt cabinet. You could use a 100 watt amp with a 30 watt cabinet, as long as you kept the volume/power level low enough you didn't cause speaker distortion. (different than preamp tube or power amp distortion) (yes I've done it, keep it low it'll work ok just don't crank it)

I've been running my 6 watt Fender Champ through a Kustom 2x12 cabinet that will handle a 130 watt amp for 20 years, no problem. The wattage rating of a cabinet or speaker just means that's the maximum wattage it will handle without damage, it's not a requirement that you must use that wattage amp with it or that a lower wattage amp will damage it. A higher wattage amp will damage it, if you push the power level of the amp to more than the speaker can handle.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#7
Not saying this is the issue with your guitar, but you should check this out:

https://www.taylorguitars.com/sites/default/files/10_SymptomsofaDryGuitar.pdf

Some guitars are just poorly made and have frets that need to be dressed. If you tried properly humidifying the guitar and didn't change anything, then it will need to go to a luthier. We have no idea what the environmental conditions are in your basement. I keep my music room between 40% and 50% relative humidity year around. I use a proper room humidifier.
#8
1. guitar's frets need some work,humidity isn't gonna do anything.

2. a micro terror produces 20w @ 4ohm, not 30.
It will be allright as long as the cab you pair it with is rated at the same power or higher.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#9
1) Too complex an issue to try and diagnose without seeing it, but I'd consider having the frets adjusted. Easiest way to figure it out is compare it with another guitar. How does a buddy's guitar compare?

2) Can't go too wrong with a smaller amp driving large speakers. Technically the guy is right, but music equipment is designed to take abuse, so it's over-engineered. Consumer stuff like a home stereo from Best Buy is a lot more likely to fry out with mismatched speakers/impedance than instrument-quality amps/speakers will.

This stuff is designed to take abuse because musicians are using it! Musicians are tough on their instruments.
#10
Quote by FrettieMercury
2) Can't go too wrong with a smaller amp driving large speakers. Technically the guy is right, but music equipment is designed to take abuse, so it's over-engineered. Consumer stuff like a home stereo from Best Buy is a lot more likely to fry out with mismatched speakers/impedance than instrument-quality amps/speakers will.
False, the guy's plain wrong, there's nothing mismatched and nothing is out of specs.
Quote by FrettieMercury
This stuff is designed to take abuse because musicians are using it! Musicians are tough on their instruments.
This though is very true, but don't abuse your stuff too much if you can TS
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#11
Quote by JELIFISH19
The humidifier thing is true. It's called fret sprout. But putting it in your basement with a vaporizor probably won't do anything. It won't mess up your neck more than other various changes that happen throughout the year. The permanent fix is the file down the edges. But don't wait to do this. You have to do it when it's bad or else it's just going to happen again.

The only possible way to damage your speakers is if you push the amp into clipping. But that's only a problem in PAs as most solid-state guitar amps don't allow you to go past the clipping threshold. So using the Micro Terror with that cab is perfectly fine.


just to expand on this fret sprout is a result of the wood shrinking which will happen if it get to dry. getting some humidity back into the wood wouldn't hurt. using some lemon juice or store bought stuff for the fretboard will help as well (rosewood). it does sound like a fret polish would be a good idea though.
#12
Quote by monwobobbo
just to expand on this fret sprout is a result of the wood shrinking which will happen if it get to dry. getting some humidity back into the wood wouldn't hurt. using some lemon juice or store bought stuff for the fretboard will help as well (rosewood). it does sound like a fret polish would be a good idea though.


Lemon Juice is a very bad idea...perhaps you meant lemon oil?

Which, interestingly enough, is almost never actually lemon oil, just scented mineral oil.

I've personally never actually seen a rosewood fretboard that needed oiling, but I suppose they might exist...somewhere.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#13
Quote by Arby911
Lemon Juice is a very bad idea...perhaps you meant lemon oil?

Which, interestingly enough, is almost never actually lemon oil, just scented mineral oil.

I've personally never actually seen a rosewood fretboard that needed oiling, but I suppose they might exist...somewhere.


yeah that's it.
#14
Quote by Spambot_2
1. guitar's frets need some work,humidity isn't gonna do anything.



You need to do some research on that. When the wood dries out, it contracts. Most guitar builders maintain some kind of control of their relative humidity and temperature in the factory. If the guitar is allowed to dry out, the wood will shrink and the frets can overhang the side of the neck. In this instance, it's best to rehumidify the instrument, which will usually correct the issue.

If the guitar was poorly made and the frets weren't properly dressed during he build, then no amount of humidification will correct the issue. In that case, it will need to go in for some TLC from a luthier.

To blindly say the frets need some work and humidity isn't gonna do anything is careless, especially when you're not trained as a luthier and don't have the instrument in your hands. Just sayin'...
#15
Quote by monwobobbo
yeah that's it.


lol
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
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I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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