#1
Hey everyone,

I've got a few questions about buying guitars...

1. How long would you say it is appropriate to wait for before buying your first good electric guitar? I'm enjoying using my rubbish one at the moment but how long would you say does it take for you to really realise whether you want to dedicate lots of time to the instrument?

2. Which of these guitars would you say I would be best off going for? (mainly plan on playing thrash like Annihilator, as well as some Zeppelin and some stoner-type metal like Mastodon)

  • ESP LTD H351NT
  • Jackson SLXFMG Soloist
  • Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
  • Chapman ML1


3. What does abalone inlay look like in real life? On some videos the inlay in the ESP looks nice but in pictures it looks hella garish.

Thanks all help appreciated.
Last edited by Krybs at Mar 13, 2015,
#2
1. only you can answer this some people buy their first good electric guitar a few weeks/months after starting to motivate them and other(me) didnt buy their first decent(not beginner) level instrument til a couple years as long as you can afford it and beleive that your first instrument isnt doing it for you anymore

2.any guitar with humbuckers would probably suit you well for those bands and genres
id stay away from any guitars with floating bridges for easier strign changes and less headaches

3. it looks shiny
i personally only like it in very small amounts maybe as fret markers or soemthign small but its easy enough to go to any guitar store and look at a guitar with abalone inlays
#3
1 - your call it's your money. there is no set time frame for this.

2 - if thrash is your main goal playing wise then i'd go with the Jackson or the LTD. both will also play stuff like LZ. the Epi would work but it's not really ideal for thrash stuff.

3 - as for abalone it depends on the qualty of the material used and the inlay itself. i have a strat style which has abalone postion markers and it looks great.
#4
1. How long would you say it is appropriate to wait for before buying your first good electric guitar? I'm enjoying using my rubbish one at the moment but how long would you say does it take for you to really realise whether you want to dedicate lots of time to the instrument?

Its entirely up to you to decide. The only objective reason not to buy a new guitar is if you cannot afford one. People who say otherwise, such as saying that you need to attain a certain level of skill before justifying something better, are idiots. Having to put up with a shit guitar just because people say you need to get better first is a self-fulfilling prophecy.

A good guitar encourages you to play it, and as a side effect of that, you become a better guitar player. But you need to be a better guitar player first, in order to get a guitar that motivates you to be a better guitar player.

It never made any sense to me.

2. Which of these guitars would you say I would be best off going for? (mainly plan on playing thrash like Annihilator, as well as some Zeppelin and some stoner-type metal like Mastodon)

  • ESP LTD H351NT
  • Jackson SLXFMG Soloist
  • Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
  • Chapman ML1

If you cannot decide between a Jackson Soloist or an Epiphone Les Paul, then that suggests that you don't really know what you want in terms of how a guitar feels to you. And if that actually is the case, then you need to go to a guitar store, and play more guitars. Because you may end up buying a guitar that looks cool, but hating it because it doesn't feel a certain way when playing it.

There is no right or wrong fret size, fretboard radius, fret size, neck profile, or weight, type of bridge or pickup configuration etc. You need to decide what factors appeal to you the most, and the more specific you are about those preferences, the more we can help you. But the only way you'll know what you like is, as I've already said, go down to a guitar store and try out a load of guitars.

One thing I should say is that I'd err on the side of caution if you're considering getting a guitar with a Floyd Rose bridge. A lot of younger players like to downtune their instruments and with a Floyd Rose, re-adjustment of the bridge is required whenever the guitar's tuning changes, and can be very frustrating for new players. So do your research into how to set them up, and acknowledge that their functionality does mean needing to make some sacrifices that you don't have to make if you buy a guitar with a fixed bridge.

If you ask me, get a guitar with a fixed bridge for now. Get a guitar with a Floyd Rose later on, if you want one.
3. What does abalone inlay look like in real life? On some videos the inlay in the ESP looks nice but in pictures it looks hella garish.

Thanks all help appreciated.

Abalone does indeed look like that in real life. But it refracts when moved relative to a light source. Similar to the fashion of a figured piece of wood does. I don't like the look of it either, reminds me of foil-coated christmas wrapping paper.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Mar 13, 2015,
#5
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Its entirely up to you to decide. The only objective reason not to buy a new guitar is if you cannot afford one. People who say otherwise, such as saying that you need to attain a certain level of skill before justifying something better, are idiots. Having to put up with a shit guitar just because people say you need to get better first is a self-fulfilling prophecy.

A good guitar encourages you to play it, and as a side effect of that, you become a better guitar player. But you need to be a better guitar player first, in order to get a guitar that motivates you to be a better guitar player.

It never made any sense to me.


+1

That being said, if you're still enjoying it, there's no rush. Get some practice under your belt first, before you catch GAS. (Assuming your guitar isn't holding you back.)
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#6
Yeah I'm gunna try and keep using it for a little while to make sure that it will still be fun and interesting if I get a better guitar.

Just gotta find the inspiration...
#7
I'll only address the first question.

It most definitely isn't about being good enough, but IMO, it is about understanding what you what in terms of tone, and at least some inkling of how to achieve it. I would say hold off until you understand what you want in the lump of wood, the pickups and the amplifier. - That whole thing is the musical instrument, albeit a modular one. As TDB wrote, a good guitar motivates you to become a good player, but it still has to be the right guitar for what you are trying to achieve. It was decades, literally, before I realised that I couldn't get on with electrics because I was paying way too much attention to the lump of wood and nowhere near enough to the pickups and amp. Even now the guitars are just lumps of wood, but the amplification chain has had a lot of thought, time and effort.


Maybe a good way of dealing with it is to ask - "OK, I want to play this genre, what is a good combination of guitar, pickups and amp on a total budget of $......"
#8
have to throw in my 2 cents on the buy/not buy a guitar til you're "worthy". i totally agree that ther isn't a playing skill level that justifies ________ guitar. having said that you also need to be realistic in that while you may be able to afford a $_____ guitar it won't make you a better player. once you get to the mid-range guitars and have them setup decently you should be ableto find a great playing guitar. no reason you can't find a great sounding one as well. i agree with Tony that the time to go the next step farther is when you have a reasonably solid idea of what exactly you want out of a guitar. of course if you eant and can afford that high end axe well then more power to you. if skill alone dictated what guitar i would be allowed to play then i'd be in trouble.
#9
Heheh, I've been thinking and kinda narrowed it down to either the Epi or the ESP.

Would the Epi be decent for the music I've said? I like the deep sort of Black Sabbath sound that the LP makes but lots of people seem to think it's bad for Thrash.
#10
Again, the Epiphone and the LTD are very different guitars. If you're undecided between those two guitars, then your needs aren't very defined and you need to address that before buying anything.

Any guitar with humbuckers is going to be great for thrash if the amp is good enough. A great amp will make pretty much any guitar sound awesome.
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#11
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Again, the Epiphone and the LTD are very different guitars. If you're undecided between those two guitars, then your needs aren't very defined and you need to address that before buying anything.

Any guitar with humbuckers is going to be great for thrash if the amp is good enough. A great amp will make pretty much any guitar sound awesome.


Ah kk, and what is the normal price split/distribution for guitar:amp? I was thinking of spending around £100 on an amp just like a decent solid state 15w or something.
#12
Quote by Krybs
Ah kk, and what is the normal price split/distribution for guitar:amp? I was thinking of spending around £100 on an amp just like a decent solid state 15w or something.


no such thing as a decent 15 watt solid state amp. get a Peavey VIP2 (new version of the vypyr) at the least. a used older vypyr series is good as well (30 watt or better.

amp makes the sound so it doesn't matter if you have the worlds greatest guitar. crap amp crap sound. period.
#13
Quote by Krybs
Ah kk, and what is the normal price split/distribution for guitar:amp? I was thinking of spending around £100 on an amp just like a decent solid state 15w or something.

There are many trains of thought regarding how much you should spend on your amp vs. your guitar. And which one is more important.

I think if you're just starting out, the guitar itself is more important, especially if you're on a limited budget. Guitars that cost more typically have better playability, which makes it less frustrating to learn on, and I believe that is more important at this stage.

Having a better amp is all well and good, but you don't really have a very refined ear when it comes to tone, as that sort of thing comes with experience. So personally I don't think spending all the money on an amp is the most efficient use of your money, if the intent of buying this gear is just to learn the fundamentals first.

A great amp certainly motivates you to play in much the same way a great-playing guitar does, but again learning the basics of how to play guitar is the main focus at this point. So it only makes sense to get the best-playing guitar you can afford.

This is not to downplay the importance of an amp or anything though, a good amp is a lot more important for achieving a good tone than the guitar ever will be. A 15w solid state amp is not going to get you a good tone no matter what model it is, but at this stage it doesn't matter all that much because really you're only trying to learn how to play. Not looking for the tone in your head.

Getting a better amp should be the very next thing on your shopping list after you've gained some experience with what you bought.

Regarding what amp to get, the Peavey Vypyr VIP is a great option. But go used. With a $100 budget you could get a used Vypyr 30 instead of a Vypyr 15, and the 12" speaker in the Vypyr 30 is going to make a big improvement to how the guitar sounds.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Mar 14, 2015,
#14
Quote by Krybs


1. How long would you say it is appropriate to wait for before buying your first good electric guitar? I'm enjoying using my rubbish one at the moment but how long would you say does it take for you to really realise whether you want to dedicate lots of time to the instrument?

2. Which of these guitars would you say I would be best off going for? (mainly plan on playing thrash like Annihilator, as well as some Zeppelin and some stoner-type metal like Mastodon)

  • ESP LTD H351NT
  • Jackson SLXFMG Soloist
  • Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
  • Chapman ML1


3. What does abalone inlay look like in real life? On some videos the inlay in the ESP looks nice but in pictures it looks hella garish.



1. My first guitar was a Gibson ES-335. I was a keyboardist at the time, working professionally, and I already knew what it took to develop chops at any instrument. So everyone is different. One comment, however. I've got a whole raft of expensive guitars, but I'm enjoying the hell out of some cheap ones recently (and two $200 guitars are my go-to "bar" guitars) that play as well as the expensive spread.

2. Any of those guitars will do just fine. It's usually a mistake to match the guitar to the genre; you'll just end up changing guitars as often as women change their shoes. And/or you'll have a rack of older guitars gathering dust that are near-impossible to sell because the genre is no longer in fashion. If you're 14, you don't get that. If you're 24, you begin to get it. At 34, you're regretting the mistakes you made at 14 and 24.

3. Abalone is in the eye of the beholder. I think it's a little flashy, but I don't mind it at all, and I have quite a number of guitars with abalone here and there. You won't notice it when you're playing and no one beyond five feet from you in the audience will notice, either. What's important is your playing (and if you're playing in a bar, not even THAT is all that important <G>.

Here's the thing: unless you're playing to an audience of guitarists who play exactly what you do, no one will really notice your guitar. We once took an informal poll of males and females leaving a packed (about 500 people) bar, asking them what kind of guitar the lead player was playing (a CSB Les Paul). All shrugged their shoulders, but the most-offered female answer was, "Red?" Most of the males didn't know; they were checking out the females that were checking out the lead guitar player.
#15
Quote by dspellman
1. My first guitar was a Gibson ES-335. I was a keyboardist at the time, working professionally, and I already knew what it took to develop chops at any instrument. So everyone is different. One comment, however. I've got a whole raft of expensive guitars, but I'm enjoying the hell out of some cheap ones recently (and two $200 guitars are my go-to "bar" guitars) that play as well as the expensive spread.

2. Any of those guitars will do just fine. It's usually a mistake to match the guitar to the genre; you'll just end up changing guitars as often as women change their shoes. And/or you'll have a rack of older guitars gathering dust that are near-impossible to sell because the genre is no longer in fashion. If you're 14, you don't get that. If you're 24, you begin to get it. At 34, you're regretting the mistakes you made at 14 and 24.

3. Abalone is in the eye of the beholder. I think it's a little flashy, but I don't mind it at all, and I have quite a number of guitars with abalone here and there. You won't notice it when you're playing and no one beyond five feet from you in the audience will notice, either. What's important is your playing (and if you're playing in a bar, not even THAT is all that important <G>.

Here's the thing: unless you're playing to an audience of guitarists who play exactly what you do, no one will really notice your guitar. We once took an informal poll of males and females leaving a packed (about 500 people) bar, asking them what kind of guitar the lead player was playing (a CSB Les Paul). All shrugged their shoulders, but the most-offered female answer was, "Red?" Most of the males didn't know; they were checking out the females that were checking out the lead guitar player.


ain't that the truth. my wife knows my guitars by color or oh that's the pretty one etc but hasn't a clue who makes them etc. my best guitar is the ugly black one.
#16
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
There are many trains of thought regarding how much you should spend on your amp vs. your guitar. And which one is more important.

I think if you're just starting out, the guitar itself is more important, especially if you're on a limited budget. Guitars that cost more typically have better playability, which makes it less frustrating to learn on, and I believe that is more important at this stage.

Having a better amp is all well and good, but you don't really have a very refined ear when it comes to tone, as that sort of thing comes with experience. So personally I don't think spending all the money on an amp is the most efficient use of your money, if the intent of buying this gear is just to learn the fundamentals first.

A great amp certainly motivates you to play in much the same way a great-playing guitar does, but again learning the basics of how to play guitar is the main focus at this point. So it only makes sense to get the best-playing guitar you can afford.

This is not to downplay the importance of an amp or anything though, a good amp is a lot more important for achieving a good tone than the guitar ever will be. A 15w solid state amp is not going to get you a good tone no matter what model it is, but at this stage it doesn't matter all that much because really you're only trying to learn how to play. Not looking for the tone in your head.

Getting a better amp should be the very next thing on your shopping list after you've gained some experience with what you bought.

Regarding what amp to get, the Peavey Vypyr VIP is a great option. But go used. With a $100 budget you could get a used Vypyr 30 instead of a Vypyr 15, and the 12" speaker in the Vypyr 30 is going to make a big improvement to how the guitar sounds.


+1

(except I haven't tried the peavey vypyrs, but +1 to the rest)
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#17
^^^^^Do you really think that, within reasonable limits, that there is any relationship between price and playability that can't be fixed with a decent set up? Even in acoustics, most seem to be good apart from set up these days. After all, a CNC router works pretty much the same way anywhere.

Dspellman, I disagree with you on the genre thing. I think one should aim for something that has some degree of street cred/mojo/history in wherever your musical interests lie. I don't think that you are going to find it attractive enough in either tone or looks to want to play it otherwise. Sure we end up changing/collecting gear, but there are only a lucky few that don't; I think it has more to do with defining sound, mojo or cosmetics than changing genres.
Last edited by Tony Done at Mar 14, 2015,
#18
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^^Do you really think that, within reasonable limits, that there is any relationship between price and playability that can't be fixed with a decent set up? Even in acoustics, most seem to be good apart from set up these days. After all, a CNC router works pretty much the same way anywhere.

Um... Yes?

Poor fret-levelling, poor fret finishing overall, poorly radiused fretboard, poor string alignment and poor intonation due to a misplaced bridge or a shitty bridge design, poorly set neck causing a bad neck angle.

If you count acoustics, then all of the above, and loose braces, and too much bridge deflection.

There are plenty of things that can make a guitar less playable that a simple setup cannot fix and there are plenty of others that I haven't mentioned.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Mar 14, 2015,
#19
OK, but how common are bad guitars these days, really, and how closely is it related to price, within reasonable limits? I get to play a lot of different acoustics and most seem good to me, apart from set up deficiences. - And you find those at all prices. Eg I recently tried a $2000 Cole Clark that felt bad simply because the neck relief was off.
#20
Well guitars do require resources to be built to a standard where there are no perceived mechanical issues. Where that line is drawn depends on your personal expectations. A guitar that doesn't have frets polished by Angelina Jolie's ass might be considered a mechanical fault, when on the other hand, one person might only consider something a fault if the fault is greater in magnitude to the aforementioned.

I've played plenty of £200 Washburn acoustics that needed a neck reset right out of the box to get the action to a level that's acceptable for me.
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#21
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^^Do you really think that, within reasonable limits, that there is any relationship between price and playability that can't be fixed with a decent set up? Even in acoustics, most seem to be good apart from set up these days. After all, a CNC router works pretty much the same way anywhere.

Dspellman, I disagree with you on the genre thing. I think one should aim for something that has some degree of street cred/mojo/history in wherever your musical interests lie. I don't think that you are going to find it attractive enough in either tone or looks to want to play it otherwise. Sure we end up changing/collecting gear, but there are only a lucky few that don't; I think it has more to do with defining sound, mojo or cosmetics than changing genres.


a good setup can overcome many things but not everything. keep in mind that the true quality of a guitar can't be judged new out of the box. sure new a good setup will make damn near any guitar no matter how cheap playable. how long it stays that way is another issue. 1 year, 5 years, 20 years etc tells the tale. a guitar using lesser wood and cheap parts won't hold up or retain the ability to make use of a good setup. CNC makes the woodworking end of things easier and more consistent. nothing to do with quality in the long run (past a spec).

as for what you're saying on the genre thing you have some good points but.... street cred / mojo / history are perhaps some of the lesser considerations in my book. "mojo" comes from a particular guitar and is earned, nothing to do with genre. street cred is just another way of saying " i wanna be like everyone else". history definitely has some validation to it but remember someone did it first before it was a given. if you go that route then you are robbing yourself of a chance to explore.buy a guitar because it works for you. i've mentioned before that i play blues with my BC Rich Eagle. now based on your thoughts that would be a big no no. you play blues it's with a strat or a les paul so no street cred with a BCR. who ever heard of a guy playing blues with that, certainly no "mojo" there. and once again who does that so no "history".

now i'm all for right tools for the job so it doesn't hurt to look at say a jackson for metal after all many of them were designed with that in mind. however, no reason to turn your nose up at another guitar just because it doesn't come to mind when playing metal. who knows maybe that guitar will become the new must have axe for that "genre" only takes one popular guitar player to show the way.
#22
I don't think the neck angle problem is strongly related to price either. FWIW, neck angle is the first thing I look at in acoustics, regardless of price - unless it is a Taylor, in which the neck is fully bolt-on. Have a look at some Martins. They also have variable neck angles, and a fix they use is to put different thickness bridges on them so that there is a respectable amount of saddle showing. If I was buying, I would be doing the whole geometry thing - neck relief, action height and distance between the guitar top and the strings at the bridge.
#23
Quote by monwobobbo
my BC Rich Eagle.



Oh, I dunno, at least it hasn't got spikes and/or odd cutouts. I'm very consersative, but I came close to buying one of those Tokai aluminium-body Talbos because I liked the look. You're right, you have to play what appeals to you, regardless - but things like floating trems and 20K ohm humbuckers might just make life more difficult if you want to pay electric blues.

I wonder how many of the innovators started that way, rather than moved in that direction after they became confident of their playing skills?

EDIT - I tend to be the devil's advocate and overstate the case, because there is so much wikitruth - truth by mass opinion - on the internet. - The world was flat and supported on the backs of four elephants until someone took a closer look.
Last edited by Tony Done at Mar 14, 2015,
#24
Quote by monwobobbo

now i'm all for right tools for the job


Same here. You can overexaggerate the differences but you can understate them as well. Personally I'd try to steer a new player towards getting a guitar which is suitable for the genre(s) he/she wants to play. There's a time and a place for thinking outside the box, and I don't think that time is just when you're starting out. You need to know the rules before you can break them and all that.

Don't get me wrong, I know personal preference plays a pretty big part as well. And it depends on exactly what you mean by "just starting out". If you literally can't play a note, it's hard to try a bunch of guitars to see what you like. If you've had a lesson or two, or borrowed a friend's guitar for a few weeks, maybe you can play enough to go to a shop to try out some different styles of guitars.

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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#25
Quote by Dave_Mc
Same here. You can overexaggerate the differences but you can understate them as well. Personally I'd try to steer a new player towards getting a guitar which is suitable for the genre(s) he/she wants to play. There's a time and a place for thinking outside the box, and I don't think that time is just when you're starting out. You need to know the rules before you can break them and all that.

Don't get me wrong, I know personal preference plays a pretty big part as well. And it depends on exactly what you mean by "just starting out". If you literally can't play a note, it's hard to try a bunch of guitars to see what you like. If you've had a lesson or two, or borrowed a friend's guitar for a few weeks, maybe you can play enough to go to a shop to try out some different styles of guitars.



oh yeah definitely. when first starting out you do kinda need to keep it simple so to speak. i wouldn't tell a guy who wants to play Avenged 7x to buy a 52 tele reissue even if it could petentially do the job (not likely though). i do however try not to dicourage guys from going with a guitar that would be perfectly fine for what they want even though it's not a commonly thought of one.

Tony - the Eagle while not as crazy as some of the other BCR guitar is still not exactly normal. no points though. no reason you can't use a floating trem in blues at all more players probably should as the trem is a very expressive tool (my strat is set t float).

20k pups might be great through a fairly clean amp for blues breakup. won't know till you try.
#26
Just gotta try them out and see what works for you.You will more than likely change guitars many times before you find the one that suits you best.
I started out on Strat copies,Then Les Paul copies.Then real Strats and expensive Gibsons that would'nt stay in tune and fell apart after a year of gigging.When i was a kid starting out i was a huge Slash fan and all i ever wanted was a Les Paul Std,I had two and they both let me down.Had an SG for a while which was much more reliable.
Took me 20 years to find out that i like Telecasters better than any of those other guitars.My MIM gets played every day and feels better to me than any other guitar.It's all trial and error.
You just gotta go with what feels best and makes you want to pick it up but you will more than likely go through many changes before you find what you really like.
#27
^^^^^ I went the same way with acoustics. I eventually figured out that hype is no substitute for experience. I think electrics are more difficult, because, at least in my case, there was a co-evolution of amps and guitars. You buy a guitar, then an amp that suits it, then a better guitar that suits the amp, then a better amp that suits the guitar, and so on.
#28
Quote by monwobobbo
oh yeah definitely. when first starting out you do kinda need to keep it simple so to speak. i wouldn't tell a guy who wants to play Avenged 7x to buy a 52 tele reissue even if it could petentially do the job (not likely though). i do however try not to dicourage guys from going with a guitar that would be perfectly fine for what they want even though it's not a commonly thought of one.


Oh yeah absolutely. When i say something suitable, I mean the style of the guitar, not the brand. I don't mean to only consider the really big brands (though again if it's a brand that no-one has heard of, that might be for a reason ).

I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#29
Thank you loads everyone for all of the help, it really is appreciated.

I just have one last question which I'm a bit stumped on;
I played around and really enjoyed the weight and feel of the Les Pauls so I've decided I'm either going to get an Epi LP Custom Pro (with Probuckers (similar to burst buckers)) or go for the Matt Heafy 6 string Epi LP which has EMG 81/85.

Seeing as the Matt Heafy guitar is about £100 more expensive, do you think it is worth that cost increase on the pickups and a slight change to the neck (less boxy at neck making high frets more accessible) or should I put that money towards amp/proper set up of guitar? Thanks.
#30
Quote by Krybs
Thank you loads everyone for all of the help, it really is appreciated.

I just have one last question which I'm a bit stumped on;
I played around and really enjoyed the weight and feel of the Les Pauls so I've decided I'm either going to get an Epi LP Custom Pro (with Probuckers (similar to burst buckers)) or go for the Matt Heafy 6 string Epi LP which has EMG 81/85.

Seeing as the Matt Heafy guitar is about £100 more expensive, do you think it is worth that cost increase on the pickups and a slight change to the neck (less boxy at neck making high frets more accessible) or should I put that money towards amp/proper set up of guitar? Thanks.


i'd go with the Heafy if upper access is a big part of your playing. if you like actives then once again probably worth it.
#31
Honestly the Matt Heafy LP is an awesome guitar. The carved out neck heel is a fantastic feature and I wish more LP's had it.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend