#1
is it better to learn scales guitar using the 7 patterns explained here:http://www.fretjam.com/major-scale-positions.html
or should i just know what notes are in each key and play only those notes on the fretboard until my fingers memorize the pattern? I know the notes on the fretboard pretty decently and now im trying to learn my scales so i can start arranging my own stuff. I feel like it would be faster to just learn the patterns but in the long run, it would be better to know what notes are in each key since if i use an alternate tuning, those patterns would become useless. Any advice is appreciated.
Last edited by Darkn3ss99 at Mar 15, 2015,
#2
It depends on what you would like to do with it.
If you're just playing for fun then learning the patterns will be the easiest way.

If you want to completely master the scales then you could learn the notes (or more patterns and derivations of the basic patterns).
The fun thing about that is that you can quickly write your own patterns down without much thinking and you can play from actual sheet music and not from those tabs (which are great sometimes).

I learned myself the patterns first and I'm learning now how to quickly remember the notes that i'm actually playing.
#3
Do both. The notes make the patterns, and do give a greater understanding of the fretboard, but there's no need to reinvent the wheel when so many people have already figured out the patterns for you.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#4
Quote by Darkn3ss99
is it better to learn scales guitar using the 7 patterns explained here:http://www.fretjam.com/major-scale-positions.html
or should i just know what notes are in each key and play only those notes on the fretboard until my fingers memorize the pattern? I know the notes on the fretboard pretty decently and now im trying to learn my scales so i can start arranging my own stuff. I feel like it would be faster to just learn the patterns but in the long run, it would be better to know what notes are in each key since if i use an alternate tuning, those patterns would become useless. Any advice is appreciated.

I didn't read through the article you linked but I looked at the diagrams and in that diagram there are only five patterns. There are some double ups to make 7. Pattern 1 and Pattern 7 are the same pattern. Pattern 3 and Pattern 4 are the same pattern.
Si
#5
Quote by 20Tigers
I didn't read through the article you linked but I looked at the diagrams and in that diagram there are only five patterns. There are some double ups to make 7. Pattern 1 and Pattern 7 are the same pattern. Pattern 3 and Pattern 4 are the same pattern.

ye i noticed that. I think it would be better to think of it as 7 patterns because if i think of it like that, then i would be able to tell what degree of the scale im in. For example im playing c major. pattern 1 will always be played on the first degree which is c, and pattern 7 will always be the 7th degree which is b. Dont know if this is a good way of thinking in terms of those patterns. Ill just memorize the patterns for now.
One last question. What exactly is the caged system? Ive heard it mentioned a lot of times but never really understood. Is the caged system the pattern the link mentions?
Last edited by Darkn3ss99 at Mar 16, 2015,
#6
The five shapes that are in that link are the same five shapes used in the CAGED system.

The way the CAGED system works is that each of the five scale patterns is associated with a chord shape that links two neighbouring root notes. If those five chord shapes were played in open position (using open strings) then they would be the C major chord, A major chord, G major chord, E major chord, and D major chord shapes (hence the name C A G E D).

So in C major for example we would have the open C major chord shape. Around that we can build a full major scale. If we play an open A major chord shape and slide it up three frets it becomes a C major chord we can then build the C major scale around that chord shape. If we play an open G major chord shape and slide it up five frets we then have a C major chord that we can build an C major scale around.

Have a look through the five different patterns in that diagram. Then draw out some fret diagrams and redraw each pattern starting with just the root third and fifth scale degrees. This will give the major chord shape in that shape.

There are some good and some bad articles around on the CAGED system. Have a look through a few. Personally I think it's a pretty good method but there are others that dislike it for various reasons.