#1
I know a similar thread was posted earlier, but my question is why do most bands that I find on YouTube and Facebook not have a form of bass? Every single band cover video I watch always misses out the bassist, and I've never seen a bassist on Facebook bands lists, are bass players that unappreciated this badly?
#2
Quote by Robert2511
I know a similar thread was posted earlier, but my question is why do most bands that I find on YouTube and Facebook not have a form of bass? Every single band cover video I watch always misses out the bassist, and I've never seen a bassist on Facebook bands lists, are bass players that unappreciated this badly?


Some guitarists think they're god's gift. Some figure that they can either do without a bassist for recording (because they tune so low or because they do some lame-ass octaver stuff). Most of the things I've heard that don't use a good bassist sound like they have a guitar player pretending to play bass. Some sound like they're using a drum machine as well. And some bands think they can simply pick one up if they have a gig. It's like photography. Give someone a good digital camera and two Photoshop lessons and they think they're a photographer. And some have no clue, really, what a good bass player can do for them.

Here's another thought. I have a sequencer on my Korg Kronos X. I've also got some really good drums, really good pianos, organs, some seriously decent horns and strings on that same keyboard. Oh, and bass as well. About the only thing I have to play to complete the demo is some guitar and do a little singing (and a VoiceLive 3 will provide harmony and autotune <G>. Why bother with "band" until you need to record or go on the road?
#3
I played all the bass parts on my album cos of time and cost convenience.
Plus I am God, nevermind 'God's gift'
ZEN JUDDHISM
The new solo project, and spiritual philosophy... Album out now !
----------------------------------------------------------
hybrid 6.0
Debut album 'Silent Destruction' out now
Read the Two Guys Metal review here
#4
Quote by dspellman
Some guitarists think they're god's gift. Some figure that they can either do without a bassist for recording (because they tune so low or because they do some lame-ass octaver stuff). Most of the things I've heard that don't use a good bassist sound like they have a guitar player pretending to play bass. Some sound like they're using a drum machine as well. And some bands think they can simply pick one up if they have a gig. It's like photography. Give someone a good digital camera and two Photoshop lessons and they think they're a photographer. And some have no clue, really, what a good bass player can do for them.

Here's another thought. I have a sequencer on my Korg Kronos X. I've also got some really good drums, really good pianos, organs, some seriously decent horns and strings on that same keyboard. Oh, and bass as well. About the only thing I have to play to complete the demo is some guitar and do a little singing (and a VoiceLive 3 will provide harmony and autotune <G>. Why bother with "band" until you need to record or go on the road?

My friend asked me if you could just tune a guitar an octave lower to play the bass part, when he asked that my brain hurt haha, there is a lot more to bass then people think, I guess most people under appreciate it because most bass players in common pop and rock bands just follow the guitar, meaning they can't tell it's there cause it's blended with the guitar
#6
Maybe you are listening to the wrong bands? I have seen a lot of videos of crappy bands who just have two guitarists and a drummer, performing Metallica songs as instrumentals.

But almost all proper bands I have heard of have a bassist. Well, maybe it has to do with the genre. The bass guitar isn't of course that important in drop Z tuning music because the guitar is already playing really low frequencies (well, of course it will add some color to the overall sound) - but I don't really listen to that kind of music. And even in that genre I would guess most bands have a bassist.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
Quote by Deliriumbassist
^pop bassists generally play far more interesting parts than rock and metal bassists.

Personally I would disagree, from my experience pop bassists usually follow a steady simple bass line where as rock and metal bassist usually have more complex and even independent parts in some cases, good examples would be James Johnston of Biffy Clyro, a lot of his work contains a bass line completely different to what the guitarist is playing, and Jaime Preciado of Pierce the Veil, he's one of the most creative rock bassists I know.
#8
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Maybe you are listening to the wrong bands? I have seen a lot of videos of crappy bands who just have two guitarists and a drummer, performing Metallica songs as instrumentals.

But almost all proper bands I have heard of have a bassist. Well, maybe it has to do with the genre. The bass guitar isn't of course that important in drop Z tuning music because the guitar is already playing really low frequencies (well, of course it will add some color to the overall sound) - but I don't really listen to that kind of music. And even in that genre I would guess most bands have a bassist.


The lowest a band I listen to has gone is Drop G (Bring Me the Horizon - Sleep With One Eye Open) as far as I'm aware and still I can tell there is bass in the song, you can just feel it you know and I'm pretty sure most of these YouTube bands don't realise that bass is meant to be 'felt' more than heard. I could never listen to a band without a bassist as it would just sound too flat, especially in the heavier parts.
#9
Quote by Robert2511
Personally I would disagree, from my experience pop bassists usually follow a steady simple bass line where as rock and metal bassist usually have more complex and even independent parts in some cases, good examples would be James Johnston of Biffy Clyro, a lot of his work contains a bass line completely different to what the guitarist is playing, and Jaime Preciado of Pierce the Veil, he's one of the most creative rock bassists I know.


I said interesting, not complex. I am a big metal fan, but I can quite happily point to basslines from songs by Marvin Gaye, Michael Jackson, Chic, Gary Numan, Candi Staton... you can over complicate a bass line and completely ruin the song. But keeping a bass line interesting and in context is far more impressive.
#10
I have one word if you think that pop basslines can't be interesting: "Bernadette". Even some of today's most saccharine, pablum filled pop songs have some really nice bass lines. Keep your ears and your mind open.
#11
Quote by Deliriumbassist
I said interesting, not complex. I am a big metal fan, but I can quite happily point to basslines from songs by Marvin Gaye, Michael Jackson, Chic, Gary Numan, Candi Staton... you can over complicate a bass line and completely ruin the song. But keeping a bass line interesting and in context is far more impressive.


I understand what you mean by overcomplicating it, and I probably should have used better words then complex haha, I haven't heard many decent pop basslines and so can't personally think of any examples myself, though I will take your word for it.
#12
Quote by anarkee
I have one word if you think that pop basslines can't be interesting: "Bernadette". Even some of today's most saccharine, pablum filled pop songs have some really nice bass lines. Keep your ears and your mind open.


I didn't say that they can't be interesting, I said that from my experience they generally aren't and are quiet boring, even though I personally despise most pop music I don't discriminate against it. My point was most pop music I hear on the radio through daily life doesn't have interesting basslines even though they have a lot of potential.
#13
Pop music is such a wide genre that the definitions of "pop" basslines may be pretty different. For example Duran Duran is pop music and has great basslines in it. It has to do with the artists you are listening to. But if you are talking about today's mainstream pop, it usually doesn't have that standout basslines in it.

If we are talking about soul/funk/disco influenced music, it usually has great basslines - the music is really groove based and bass plays a really important part in it. Yeah, maybe people should be more specific with what they mean with "pop".
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#14
Part of the problem with "Pop Music" and the bass is that a great deal of "Pop" is performed by solo singers who have little or nothing to do with the songwriting. Thus, when it is time to record the song, a studio bass player is hired and frequently has to come up with a bass line on the spot; this after hearing the producer cite the inevitable: "Hey, you on the bass! Don't play too many notes!" So much for any hope of an interesting bass line.

Even so, some "Pop" bands and even a few songwriters do not neglect the bass. As long as they understand that the bass is about more than quarter notes or eighth notes on the root, there is a lot of room in those tunes for interesting bass work.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#15
Quote by Robert2511
I didn't say that they can't be interesting, I said that from my experience they generally aren't and are quiet boring, even though I personally despise most pop music I don't discriminate against it. My point was most pop music I hear on the radio through daily life doesn't have interesting basslines even though they have a lot of potential.


Radios aren't the greatest pieces of kit sound quality wise. The frequency response provided by FM radio is roughly 50Hz-15kHz. Then you have awful signal-to-noise ratio. Basslines are generally masked when listening to the radio, which is a shame, but it's all technical limitations and necessities. You'll hear the potential is there, but not realise that the potential is actually being used! A lot of people who are 'into' music don't seem to have much of an idea on how to reproduce it well, which baffles me (not a dog at you personally, may I add, I'm just talking in generalities here).
#16
That Christmas song by The Waitresses - best bassline evarrr
ZEN JUDDHISM
The new solo project, and spiritual philosophy... Album out now !
----------------------------------------------------------
hybrid 6.0
Debut album 'Silent Destruction' out now
Read the Two Guys Metal review here
#17
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Radios aren't the greatest pieces of kit sound quality wise. The frequency response provided by FM radio is roughly 50Hz-15kHz. Then you have awful signal-to-noise ratio. Basslines are generally masked when listening to the radio, which is a shame, but it's all technical limitations and necessities. You'll hear the potential is there, but not realise that the potential is actually being used! A lot of people who are 'into' music don't seem to have much of an idea on how to reproduce it well, which baffles me (not a dog at you personally, may I add, I'm just talking in generalities here).


When you put it that way that does sort of explain the absence of bass I've been hearing while listening to the radio, and that was one of my points creating this thread, when making music a lot of people don't read up on the ins and outs and just dive in.