#1
I am going to make 2 humbucker pickups for a guitar i am working on but I am struggling to fine the differences between the 42 and 43 awg wire for winding the pickups. Could anyone help me with the pros and cons of each?
#2
43awg is thinner wire.

As such you can get more windings on a bobbin, and can overwind to give a "hotter" pickup.

However this is only true to a certain point as you can overwind too much and loose clarity and warmth. Typically winding wag 43 on PAF to around 8k gives warm sounds over 9k5 it looses this warmth (DC res).

You also need to consider the ac characteristics against the DC resistance, change in diameter not only affects DC resistance but also the inductance and capacitance of the pup.

Quite complex really!
#3
Ok thanks, is there a preferred wire or one you would reccomend? It sounds like with the 43 you have more freedom to do more winds if you want. Also difference between enamel and poly-coated wire?
#4
Quote by edwarrdd
I am going to make 2 humbucker pickups for a guitar i am working on but I am struggling to fine the differences between the 42 and 43 awg wire for winding the pickups. Could anyone help me with the pros and cons of each?


WHY are you going to make 2 humbucker pickups for a guitar you're working on if you don't understand basic pickup construction parameters yet?

This isn't a diss, by any means; it's just a query about why it's necessary to do this if you don't have the experience to do it. It's a bit like trying to make gourmet wines for a particular meal without ever having tasted the stuff.
#5
I understand the construction of a pickup but do not fully understand the wire for coils, I was only asking because this information is hard to find, upon searching for differences between enamel coated wire and poly-coated i only find that enamel is often used for vintage pickups. I want to know the different sounds/tones that these wires make. Everyone has to start somewhere and I am only beginning the research I will do to finally make my pickups. You wouldn't be able to make a pickup without asking questions and inquiring about how to go about it.
#6
Quote by edwarrdd
I understand the construction of a pickup but do not fully understand the wire for coils, I was only asking because this information is hard to find, upon searching for differences between enamel coated wire and poly-coated i only find that enamel is often used for vintage pickups. I want to know the different sounds/tones that these wires make. Everyone has to start somewhere and I am only beginning the research I will do to finally make my pickups. You wouldn't be able to make a pickup without asking questions and inquiring about how to go about it.


Asking questions about making a pickup is one thing.

Asking questions about what a wire gauge sounds like is another.

Pick up some of each, some magnets and bobbins and wind. You don't need a lot of gear, and you can tell a LOT more about the differences in pickups once you've wound a few, put them on a guitar and listened. The whole point of winding your own pickups (other than for the experience of doing so) is to be able to refine things to a greater degree than what you can get from custom winders. There isn't a recipe for "greatest pickup ever" on the internet.

#7
I really wasn't asking for a recipe for the greatest pickup, I think you misunderstood. I was only wanting a quick rundown of the properties of different types of wire. I am not going to spend £100+ on different wires when with a little more information i could spend just 20.
#8
Quote by edwarrdd
I really wasn't asking for a recipe for the greatest pickup, I think you misunderstood. I was only wanting a quick rundown of the properties of different types of wire. I am not going to spend £100+ on different wires when with a little more information i could spend just 20.


I understood perfectly. My point was that there are no definitive sonic properties of different gauges of wire (and certainly not of the coatings). It's all a matter of the total combination of gauge, number of winds, magnets used, type of winding done, etc.
#9
Ok, thank you there seems to be misleading info on stewmac, would you recommend the thinner 43 AWG to test at first, so i can adjust the amount of coils more?
#11
I'm not sure what the "misleading" information might be on stewmac. Here's what I have (the boldface is mine):

42 AWG (American Wire Gauge) is the standard coil wire used in humbuckers, Strat® pickups, and Tele® bridge pickups.

43 AWG is used at the Tele neck position and in Rickenbacker pickups. 43-gauge wire requires fewer windings to attain a desired coil resistance.


Ignore the fluff about "The plain enamel coating varies slightly in thickness, unlike more consistent modern poly-coated wire. This gives individual pickups a unique, more raw sound." Enameled wire is used to replicate and rewind vintage pickups that had enamel-coated wire originally, largely for color matching.

Once again, be aware that achieving a high DC resistance isn't the only factor here and that there's a LOT of misinformation and mythology on the internet regarding pickup construction, including some pontifications from pickup winders themselves.

I have no designs on becoming a pickup winder, but I spent a summer, once, testing, measuring resistance and Henries and pulling apart pickups and swapping magnets, pole pieces, etc. and making notes regarding what sounded best in what part of what kind of guitar with what kind of body wood. I've got three notebooks worth of data. At the end of all of it my brain exploded and I went back to something that made more sense, like a Rubik cube or Legos. But even now, when I run into a pickup on a guitar that just sounds nasty, I'll pull it, measure it, add it to the notebook and toss it into a box.