#1
Why do we like it when words rhyme?
It never fails every time.
As guitar enthusiasts in your prime,
To not contribute to this thread would be a crime.
ZEN JUDDHISM
The new solo project, and spiritual philosophy... Album out now !
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hybrid 6.0
Debut album 'Silent Destruction' out now
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#2
And if you like rhyming couplets, buy my album
ZEN JUDDHISM
The new solo project, and spiritual philosophy... Album out now !
----------------------------------------------------------
hybrid 6.0
Debut album 'Silent Destruction' out now
Read the Two Guys Metal review here
#4
Please OP, don't be a criminal
the last line you wrote has too many syllables.
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And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#6
I don't know.
I don't care.
I've got a whole,
set of hair.
There's nothing left here to be saved
Just barreling dogs and barking trains
Another year lost to the blue line
#7
Because the human mind is always in search for connections. We like it even more when it's repeated a lot, and it's called rap. We feel safe when something repeatedly is the same, this means it's predictable and we can "work" with it.

Even if it's no more than predicting that cars for 99% of the time won't drive when something as superficial as a light is red. It's not about the red light that makes us feel safe, it's that we safely crossed the road a 1000 times while green, that people even stop looking to the road after a while and cross over solely based on the colour of the light.

Basically repeated same results makes us feel cozy, and even put full faith in them.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 20, 2015,
#8
Cuz jingles are fun and a great way to make your coworkers ignore everything you'll ever say
Sail upon the open skies
#10
I would prefer it
If we all spoke in haiku
That would be better
#12
The problem with rhyming
and other cute verse
Is that unless you're an expert
it often sounds worse

Instead of constructing a couplet
with a limiting metre
just say it in prose
the construction is neater

But if rhyme you must
a compulsion that drives it
make it like masturbation
and do it in private
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#14
Well, why do we like pizza? Because it's pizza!

So, why do we like rhymes? Because they're pizza. Obvious as f*ck.
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#17
Because Busta Prose just doesn't work...

I am rather fond of large butts, and I shall not relay this to you inaccurately. My fellow residents of the city of Compton, you will surely concur. When a girl walks in being rather thin, but proportioned extremely to the rear you develop an erection.

See? Crap!
#18
^eww

i'd say just because we like rhythm which rhyming gives us. it's in the same word lol. why we like rhythm, i dunno and don't feel like thinking about
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#22
Good art makes people feel something or think about something. Rhyming happens to be a very effective way of creating tension and releasing it, which is the essential ingredient in all art.

I personally think stresses are more interesting/important.

I was recently reading about a theory that suggests singing may have developed before spoken word. The guy was talking about how we each have our own 'tonic' when we speak. You sit on your 'tonic' when you're using prepositions, conjunctions, articles, and pronouns.

He goes on to say that when we stress a syllable, we raise the pitch of our voice by about ~a 3rd. When we're emphasizing a word or phrase, we go up by ~a 5th.

When we whine or tease, we do it in minor 3rds. When we're kind of wound up/nervous, we move up by ~a 4th. When we're being angry/aggressive, we generally go up by ~a 5th unless we're threatening someone. Then we'll go down a 5th. When you fear for your life, our voices go up by about a ~b7/6.

He says these are most likely related to the first 5 harmonics which seem to be the basis for music in many cultures (pentatonic scales of various kinds).

I did a little experimenting of my own with it today. Pretty interesting stuff:

Apparently I speak (roughly) around a G# (slightly sharper but less than halfway to A). I confirmed that stressed syllables were generally floating around a B (M3) and emphasized syllables were floating on the D (5th). 'Wound up' voice checked out. Was a C (4th). Whining was ~a minor 3rd and depending on the 'type' ("Something bad happened" or "You're annoying me" types) it would start in different spots but both 'types' involved either the #4 or the b7/6. Turned on my 'getting busy' voice and found that it generally hangs around the b7/6, 4th, and 5th up or will go down a M3, while seemingly avoiding the 'Tonic'. When I tried out my 'sad/disappointed' voice, it seemed to be hovering around the 6/b6.

Then I was thinking: I know I'm not the only one that has 'different' voices for when I'm talking to different people. I have my 'Parents' voice, my 'talking with friends' voice, my 'I'm trying to sound professional' voice, etc. Apparently when I'm talking to my parents, I raise my entire register up to around an A#. My 'professional' voice drops down to around a F# or a G. My 'friends' voice is still a G# but the inflections seem to become slightly sharper.

I found it interesting that many of the things that happen to my voice (without my even knowing) seem to be related to how music theory describes the stability/instability of notes.

I'm starting to write this stuff down. I think it could prove kinda useful for not only songwriting, but just verbal communication in general.


Anyway, I think it kind of brings poetry and rhyming into a new context. When we're rhyming (or even just speaking), in a way, we're singing. Those rhymes are the cadence and the way you arranged the stressed syllables is the melodic phrase.
Last edited by mjones1992 at Mar 20, 2015,
#24
Quote by mjones1992
Good art makes people feel something or think about something. Rhyming happens to be a very effective way of creating tension and releasing it, which is the essential ingredient in all art.

I personally think stresses are more interesting/important.

I was recently reading about a theory that suggests singing may have developed before spoken word. The guy was talking about how we each have our own 'tonic' when we speak. You sit on your 'tonic' when you're using prepositions, conjunctions, articles, and pronouns.

He goes on to say that when we stress a syllable, we raise the pitch of our voice by about ~a 3rd. When we're emphasizing a word or phrase, we go up by ~a 5th.

When we whine or tease, we do it in minor 3rds. When we're kind of wound up/nervous, we move up by ~a 4th. When we're being angry/aggressive, we generally go up by ~a 5th unless we're threatening someone. Then we'll go down a 5th. When you fear for your life, our voices go up by about a ~b7/6.

He says these are most likely related to the first 5 harmonics which seem to be the basis for music in many cultures (pentatonic scales of various kinds).

I did a little experimenting of my own with it today. Pretty interesting stuff:

Apparently I speak (roughly) around a G# (slightly sharper but less than halfway to A). I confirmed that stressed syllables were generally floating around a B (M3) and emphasized syllables were floating on the D (5th). 'Wound up' voice checked out. Was a C (4th). Whining was ~a minor 3rd and depending on the 'type' ("Something bad happened" or "You're annoying me" types) it would start in different spots but both 'types' involved either the #4 or the b7/6. Turned on my 'getting busy' voice and found that it generally hangs around the b7/6, 4th, and 5th up or will go down a M3, while seemingly avoiding the 'Tonic'. When I tried out my 'sad/disappointed' voice, it seemed to be hovering around the 6/b6.

Then I was thinking: I know I'm not the only one that has 'different' voices for when I'm talking to different people. I have my 'Parents' voice, my 'talking with friends' voice, my 'I'm trying to sound professional' voice, etc. Apparently when I'm talking to my parents, I raise my entire register up to around an A#. My 'professional' voice drops down to around a F# or a G. My 'friends' voice is still a G# but the inflections seem to become slightly sharper.

I found it interesting that many of the things that happen to my voice (without my even knowing) seem to be related to how music theory describes the stability/instability of notes.

I'm starting to write this stuff down. I think it could prove kinda useful for not only songwriting, but just verbal communication in general.


Anyway, I think it kind of brings poetry and rhyming into a new context. When we're rhyming (or even just speaking), in a way, we're singing. Those rhymes are the cadence and the way you arranged the stressed syllables is the melodic phrase.


If you could rember the article I'd be interested in reading it. I've measured my voice before and it was around G# as well.