#1
After diving back into electric after 2 years of nothing but fingerstyle acoustic, I'm having issues. For one, I can't pick. It's improving but difficult. Another issue is my left hand doesn't have the accuracy and chops. I can play the Stairway to Heaven solo, but only using excessive hammer ons and pulloffs. I don't have the speed and accuracy needed to play modern music styles that rarely hammer on and pull off.

1) How should I anchor my picking hand? Wrist on the bridge? Pinky on the bridge pickup? etc

2) Any exercises that improve pick to left hand coordination? I tend to hammer on the note I'm trying to pick before I pick it, resulting in a slapback effect. This only happens at fast tempos.
#4
Fingerstyle background? Maybe ignore the pick and play more like this guy. He does alright.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6T6AQ5yXqc
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
i just sat here for the last 2-3 hours picking the same strings in a couple of different ways and gradually increased in speed and accuracy. its so effective i might make a demo video lol. i am into video game personalities so just put some Trump arena in the background and zoned out.

edit: i made a video coz im a narcissist
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1673158
Last edited by percydw at Mar 21, 2015,
#6
Keep practicing and it will get better. Start slow and simple. I didn't actually do that and wish I had...Stairway was the first guitar solo I ever learned, on an acoustic guitar using a pick I cut out of a plastic bleach bottle. I should have started with something a lot easier...it took me a couple of months, but I got most of it, at least what I could reach on an acoustic. The cutaway acoustic still hadn't been dreamed up, Stairway was still on the charts...1973 I think.

Start slow and simple, practice at it. I use both pick and finger picking, I swap from one to the other without a problem, my main reason for learning finger picking was to be able to keep playing onstage when I dropped a pick. No more running back to the amp to get one...pick holders didn't exist then either...now I have one that mounts on my mic stand, I still finger pick if I drop a pick. I also play some things without a pick on purpose. Keep practicing, that's the only thing I know of to tell you, it will fall into place after a while.

You might try something that uses chords and some simple fills as a practice routine, so you're doing both at once, and you'll probably be able to gradually improve the finger coordination. Wildwood Flower is the only thing I can think of, I'm sure there are plenty more that incorporate chords and lead runs that would be good for practicing.

Jeff Beck...love that song...he wrote it 20 years before he switched to finger picking. The girl on bass is fantastic, look up the song "Since We've Ended as Lovers" with her on bass at the Clapton Crossroads festival. She did a bass solo that will blow you away. Never mind here it is

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_N_n-vrh4M
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#7
Quote by The Bacon Man
After diving back into electric after 2 years of nothing but fingerstyle acoustic, I'm having issues. For one, I can't pick. It's improving but difficult. Another issue is my left hand doesn't have the accuracy and chops. I can play the Stairway to Heaven solo, but only using excessive hammer ons and pulloffs. I don't have the speed and accuracy needed to play modern music styles that rarely hammer on and pull off.

1) How should I anchor my picking hand? Wrist on the bridge? Pinky on the bridge pickup? etc

2) Any exercises that improve pick to left hand coordination? I tend to hammer on the note I'm trying to pick before I pick it, resulting in a slapback effect. This only happens at fast tempos.

1) I rest my palm on the lower strings to mute them, so it gives me a frame of reference. Make sure you don't end up really sticking your hand onto the string (or any other point of reference you use) so your hand HAS to be in that spot to even play.

2) Find the phrase you're having this issue with, slow it down and then slowly work your way up. Tried and true, though a little frustrating, especially on days where you end up reaching a maximum that is lower than what you know you can play.