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#1
After the guy made thread asking about picking practice I went and made this short video of what I've been doing for a few hours today.

I've been playing guitar 2 weeks now (I guess??) so you can see these are super beginner exercises that you can still make a lot of progress on very very quickly.

I think its cool for people who are struggling with how damn slow it is to get started with guitar and need some confidence boost. Just do something really simple like this for a few hours and you'll surprise yourself...

volume is a bit shit you'll have to turn it up

(updated video)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wk3eCGgBKtk
Last edited by percydw at Mar 21, 2015,
#2
No offense, but if you've been playing for 2 weeks you should not be giving advice to anybody.

Also you'd get reported for this. Lessons don't belong in the guitar techniques section, post them in the lessons section.
Last edited by vayne92 at Mar 21, 2015,
#4
I appreciate the intention, but at 2 weeks any video anybody makes is just going to be "this is me sucking", it's harsh but it's the truth - we all sucked after just 2 weeks and at that stage nobody has anything useful to pass on in terms of wisdom or experience.

Now, it IS definitely worth videoing yourself as it's incredibly helpful to watch and listen to yourself. It's also good to look back on your playing after a couple of months as it helps you see how you've progressed.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
maybe i didn't properly communicate the purpose of the video

it is to demonstrate to super beginners an effective way to make progress in picking/hand speed in my recent experience as a super beginner

the guy in that other thread was saying he is shit at picking and i happened to have spent the last 3 hours doing these super simple exercises and found them extremely effective and encouraging so i posted a video of them

i tried to make it as obvious as possible that this is all it is but seem to be misinterpreted by 2 people now as much more than that, so i hope this post clears it up a bit. cheers
#6
Quote by percydw
maybe i didn't properly communicate the purpose of the video

it is to demonstrate to super beginners an effective way to make progress in picking/hand speed in my recent experience as a super beginner

the guy in that other thread was saying he is shit at picking and i happened to have spent the last 3 hours doing these super simple exercises and found them extremely effective and encouraging so i posted a video of them

i tried to make it as obvious as possible that this is all it is but seem to be misinterpreted by 2 people now as much more than that, so i hope this post clears it up a bit. cheers


Steven and I have not misinterpreted this post at all. On the contrary, you seem to be the one who misunderstands what we are saying. We aren't trying to be rude, but the plain and simple fact is you have been playing 2 weeks and should give advice to no-one, regardless of how long they have been playing.
Whilst you have good intentions, you are in absolutely no position to give advice to anybody because the harsh truth is you are awful and don't have any good advice to give, regardless of how adamant you may be that your advice is good.
If somebody wants specific advice about their picking, then they should have it analysed by someone who actually knows what they're talking about.

Sorry for being a dick, but somebody needs to tell you this. I understand that this video is posted with the best of intentions, but keep your practice routines to yourself and leave advice like this to people who have some semblance of credibility.
#7
I have to agree with Steven and Vayne on this one. You have been playing for two weeks, you don't know what an effective or good way to make progress is yet, you will likely come back to that video in just two weeks and say to yourself "What was i thinking?". You will reevaluate your technique many times in the coming years until you will be remotely satisfied with it. And you will stop thinking about speed as a way to measure progress and rather think about the quality of your playing, rather than the speed of it.

I mean this in the most friendly way possible. It is better to leave stuff like this to people who have been playing for a lot longer and have more experience, since you are more likely to put other beginners on a wrong path by misinforming them at the moment.

Also, any videos of suggestions on practice/lessons should go under the lessons tab on UG, not the forums. You are free to make this exact same post in the lessons column, but i'd advice you to wait with helping others until you have more experience.

Best Regards,
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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Last edited by Sickz at Mar 21, 2015,
#8
Quote by percydw
maybe i didn't properly communicate the purpose of the video

it is to demonstrate to super beginners an effective way to make progress in picking/hand speed in my recent experience as a super beginner

the guy in that other thread was saying he is shit at picking and i happened to have spent the last 3 hours doing these super simple exercises and found them extremely effective and encouraging so i posted a video of them

i tried to make it as obvious as possible that this is all it is but seem to be misinterpreted by 2 people now as much more than that, so i hope this post clears it up a bit. cheers

Have you ever heard of the phrase "the blind leading the blind"?

I understand why you posted the video, and I absolutely understand that you're excited about the progress you've made, but the fact is it's not going to be able to achieve what you hoped because you yourself are still just a beginner.

At the moment though you're going to make just as many mis-steps and mistakes as you are bits of progress, that's just how it goes when you're so new to the instrument. Being overly obsessed with speed is arguably one the more common those mis-steps, however it's entirely up to you if you want to change your focus or discover the the best way to do thigs for yourself.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#9
Quote by vayne92
Steven and I have not misinterpreted this post at all. On the contrary, you seem to be the one who misunderstands what we are saying. We aren't trying to be rude, but the plain and simple fact is you have been playing 2 weeks and should give advice to no-one, regardless of how long they have been playing.
Whilst you have good intentions, you are in absolutely no position to give advice to anybody because the harsh truth is you are awful and don't have any good advice to give, regardless of how adamant you may be that your advice is good.
If somebody wants specific advice about their picking, then they should have it analysed by someone who actually knows what they're talking about.

Sorry for being a dick, but somebody needs to tell you this. I understand that this video is posted with the best of intentions, but keep your practice routines to yourself and leave advice like this to people who have some semblance of credibility.


Dang man that was Br00tal, but yeah I agree.
#10
I have to agree with all of the above.

With 2 weeks of experience, you have no business advising anyone, good intentions or not. I've been playing 54 years and I intentionally don't respond to threads where I don't know what's going on or don't have a good idea what a solution would be.

I also agree that making a video record of your progress for your own use is a good idea, you can see your progress in a way I had no way to do in 1965. Best I could do was a cheap cassette recorder a few years later. But after 2 weeks, you still have no idea what methods work or don't work.

Leave the advise to people who actually have the experience to back it up. The people who have told you this is a bad idea do have it.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#11
first let me say that your video presentation was really good. the playing on the other hand was pretty bad. just from watching i can see that you need to work on arm position and you are using way to much pick for playing leads.

i'm not going to kill you for making an honest effort. your video hurts no one and it will help you in the long run. i'm sure a couple of years from now you'll look back on it and say "what was i thinking". 2 weeks in isn't the time to start playing leads though. you ned to work on chords and being able to put them together into a song. yeah i know leads are flashy etc but songs are made of chords and single note riffs. being able to play those will get you farther along then trying to do something that will just lead to frustration.
#12
if you want to say i'm offering advice beyond my level then you need to justify that in context of the advice. the context of the advice is "pick the same string for 3 hours straight and you'll get a bit faster", which is about the most obvious thing in the world. except to a beginner it helps to see it in action, so i made a video to demonstrate and evidence it

obviously it is not good for a) people who want to do literally anything else with their time

i think i see what the problem is. the opening line of the video is "A good way to practice guitar as a beginner is...."

obviously this is a bullshit statement when taken at face value and i'll remove it. it would better read something more like, "If you want to get a bit faster at picking as an absolute beginner and don't want to practice anything in particular whilst lounging on your bed watching television for a few hours, try this sort of stuff"


@monwobobbo thanks for your replies. i'm honestly pretty chill about the progress i make so i'm happy just messing around with lead stuff one day and chords the next. i understand what you're saying though (you said it like 3 times so i came to understand), but i'm not at a stage where i'm really bothered about playing anything in particular, i'm just chilling and practicing bits and pieces. i do look forward to making a beginners chords demo video though AHAHA XD


edited the video now , i hope this is better

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wk3eCGgBKtk
Last edited by percydw at Mar 21, 2015,
#13
Quote by percydw
if you want to say i'm offering advice beyond my level then you need to justify that in context of the advice. the context of the advice is "pick the same string for 3 hours straight and you'll get a bit faster", which is about the most obvious thing in the world. except to a beginner it helps to see it in action, so i made a video to demonstrate and evidence it

obviously it is not good for a) people who want to do literally anything else with their time

i think i see what the problem is. the opening line of the video is "A good way to practice guitar as a beginner is...."

obviously this is a bullshit statement when taken at face value and i'll remove it. it would better read something more like, "If you want to get a bit faster at picking as an absolute beginner and don't want to practice anything in particular whilst lounging on your bed watching television for a few hours, try this sort of stuff"


@monwobobbo thanks for your replies. i'm honestly pretty chill about the progress i make so i'm happy just messing around with lead stuff one day and chords the next. i understand what you're saying though (you said it like 3 times so i came to understand), but i'm not at a stage where i'm really bothered about playing anything in particular, i'm just chilling and practicing bits and pieces. i do look forward to making a beginners chords demo video though AHAHA XD


focus is what gets results. personally i woudn't recommend to anyone to pick the same string for 3 hours as that is about as tedious as it gets. i would recommend doing for a minute or two between other things as you go along. keep it fun and don't worry about being great after a few days / weeks / months. you won't be. after 35+ years of playing i'm not on the cover of any guitar mags either. you can check out a little of my playing in thelink in my profile.
#14
Clearly you're very naive and ignorant given your response. There are so many things wrong with this video that I don't even know where to begin. I'm at work now so maybe somebody else will write a big essay on my behalf
#15
Quote by vayne92
Clearly you're very naive and ignorant given your response. There are so many things wrong with this video that I don't even know where to begin. I'm at work now so maybe somebody else will write a big essay on my behalf


way to be supportive. dude he just started playing of course he's naive and ignorant to a point. guess thats why he's here looking for help and at the same time trying to be helpful. ok he doesn't have the time in to really be helpful but you can't fault the guy for having the balls to try.

i've already mentioned a few issues and did it in a polite way.give a try sometime. making fun of him won't help.
#16
Quote by percydw
if you want to say i'm offering advice beyond my level then you need to justify that in context of the advice. the context of the advice is "pick the same string for 3 hours straight and you'll get a bit faster", which is about the most obvious thing in the world. except to a beginner it helps to see it in action, so i made a video to demonstrate and evidence it

The problem is not that you're offering advice beyond your level, the problem is that you are offering advice at all. You are too naive to be offering anyone any advice because you cannot possibly know if the things you are saying are even vaguely good. For example:

Quote by percydw
"If you want to get a bit faster at picking as an absolute beginner and don't want to practice anything in particular whilst lounging on your bed watching television for a few hours, try this sort of stuff"

This is bad advice. If you are not concentrating on what you're doing, you can't make progress. I have said, for a very long time now, that 'practising' sitting in front of the TV is not practising, it is just playing. Practice requires careful examination of what you're doing and focusing on what you need to do to improve, which you can't do if you're watching TV.
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#17
you need minimal concentration for such basic muscle memory exercises, which is what makes them good for when you just want to idle infront of the tv and not do more focused practice

you can see that i did make some progress, because i made a video of it, and infact the reason i made the video was because i was pleased with the rate of progress i made from doing such simple exercises and wanted to share it for other similar super beginners to see

i have said this like 6 times now, its hard to understand how difficult the concept can be to grasp as the fact that i am playing for 2 weeks seems to have no bearing on whether what i say is true or not
Last edited by percydw at Mar 22, 2015,
#18
Quote by percydw
you need minimal concentration for such basic muscle memory exercises, which is what makes them good for when you just want to idle infront of the tv and not do more focused practice

you can see that i did make some progress, because i made a video of it, and infact the reason i made the video was because i was pleased with the rate of progress i made from doing such simple exercises and wanted to share it for other similar super beginners to see

i have said this like 6 times now, its hard to understand how difficult the concept can be to grasp as the fact that i am playing for 2 weeks only seems to have no bearing on whether what i say is true or not


i give up
#19
Quote by percydw
you need minimal concentration for such basic muscle memory exercises, which is what makes them good for when you just want to idle infront of the tv and not do more focused practice

you can see that i did make some progress, because i made a video of it, and infact the reason i made the video was because i was pleased with the rate of progress i made from doing such simple exercises and wanted to share it for other similar super beginners to see

i have said this like 6 times now, its hard to understand how difficult the concept can be to grasp as the fact that i am playing for 2 weeks seems to have no bearing on whether what i say is true or not

Fine.

Here is what is wrong with your playing:

You are picking extremely quietly, which means you have no tone to speak of. You shouldn't need to "give it a swing to get going": you practice the way you want to end up playing so putting a swing on your slow playing is not what you should be doing at all, unless you want to practice your swing playing. Your timing is inconsistent, at all speeds, particularly changing strings. Your string changing exercises are flawed because you're allowing strings to ring together, which is generally not what you want when you're alternate picking. Also, and this is a more minor detail, you're actually economy picking through your string change exercises.

Here is what is wrong with the exercises and what you have to say about them:

The way you advocate using these, they're actually not of any particular use: they don't develop any co-ordination (which is usually the real barrier to playing well for beginners) and there's no musical value to them at all. At this stage of your playing you're actually developing just by the act of playing, so sitting and playing a single string with absolutely zero musical content is actually a worse use of your time than you could get by playing literally any song. That said... playing in front of the TV and calling it practice is still very flawed, you're not improving your muscle memory, you're just reinforcing the habits you already have, which might work fine up to a point but if you're not concentrating on what you're doing you have no idea if you're ingraining bad habits in to your playing: there are many bad habits that can so easily creep in to your playing if you're not thinking about what you're doing. Practice without concentration is bad.

Now, none of these things are your fault. You're a beginner so no one expects you to be able to do much of anything. Not knowing is also not your fault, because you're a beginner and your ears are super undeveloped. No one expects you to be amazing or to know anything, you literally just haven't had the time to learn these things.

That said... the fact that you don't know these things is why you shouldn't be advising anyone on playing or practising: you do not know why you are bad, you have very little conception of how to get better or why anything might work, and so you are in no position to help anyone else. The fact you have only been playing two weeks is not why you are wrong... but it's why you don't know that you're wrong.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Mar 22, 2015,
#20
you need minimal concentration for such basic muscle memory exercises, which is what makes them good for when you just want to idle infront of the tv and not do more focused practice


You just proved the points of several of the people who have responded. Practicing in front of a TV is not practice, definitely not advisable, and since you are paying absolutely n0o attention to what you're doing, a totally useless waste of time.

Actually advising people to do this is really bad, the only comment anyone should have about a TV when advising people on how to practice is

turn the damn thing off.

Minimal concentration is the exact opposite of what you want to do when practicing. TV playing is exactly what you do not want, a distraction. I don't want people talking to me, TV on, dogs barking, and the only time I even want music playing is when I'm trying to learn a specific song so I can play along with it.

Again, you have no experience whatsoever, you don't know anywhere near enough to be trying to advise anyone. The only thing you know enough to do is practice and improve your own ability. Picking one string for hours is so insanely ridiculous I can't even think of a good response...

These people are trying to get a point across. They are right. You refuse to listen, probably because you don't want to admit anyone else is actually right. You need to take this video offline and learn to actually play before you start trying to give anyone else advise.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#21
Hello there,
I'm appreciating the fact that you are trying to share your knowledge with other players but unfortunately I'd say pretty much the same as what others said to you; none expects beginners to contribute in teaching music. You've been playing only for two weeks so at this level I'd suggest you just learn to play something that sounds musical and make sure the tune/song is right up to your alley.

You seem trying to develop your picking technique, it is necessary and I'm not against practicing exercises; but the main intention behind picking up an instrument is to play tunes and not just practicing exercises all the time. So if you are very serious about improving your techniques you surely can go through practicing exercises in effective manner, but don't forget about the thing called playing music.

I actually wanted to reply your thread mainly because of this statement of yours.
Quote by percydw
you need minimal concentration for such basic muscle memory exercises, which is what makes them good for when you just want to idle infront of the tv and not do more focused practice

Watch this little video clip, it will change your perception about playing a musical instrument. Not a fan of Megadeth myself but what the ex-guitarist of this band said here is really valuable (at least to me).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRHInnT_J4Q
#22
I only disagree with one thing he said. And only partially...

I agree that as a beginner, you need to work on music you like. That keeps you interested. But as you improve and progress, I always advise branching out and learning other styles, broadening your horizons so to speak. When starting out, he is exactly right, work on music you like and want to play.

I got into band in high school, and that brought an appreciation for jazz into my overall view of music, and a little jazz influence in my playing style. It also meant I found it easier to join in when I had chances to play in other styles. Fill in gigs for 3 years was really an eye opener...meet the band, 30 minutes later I have to get onstage with them and play whatever they call, no idea what it will be, what key they might do it in, nothing...I have no idea how many times I've had to play songs I knew, but in totally different keys. Like one guy who asked me if I could play "Proud Mary"...are you kidding??? I was playing it before it hit #1 on the radio...so off I went and he stopped me. HUH???? We play it in A. Oh no...so I had to transpose the song to the key of A, so it would fit the singer's voice, on the fly.

For that kind of thing, nothing can do you more good than branching out and playing different styles, jumping into things you know nothing about. I've played rock and blues, country, jazz, a little bluegrass, metal, hard rock, currently in a band that plays a lot of Eagles and America stuff, which is what I grew up on, and a lot of acoustic guitar. I've transposed songs to guitar that were played on the record on nothing but one piano...

So yeah I agree when you first start out, concentrate on what you like, that's what you'll enjoy and probably play most, but as you progress don't pass up a chance to learn a little about other styles. I've never even tried to master country or metal, but I've played plenty of both, so if I'm in a cover band and they want to do a Scorpions or Judas Priest song, I'm ready to go. Ditto for country tunes...I don't like country, but I can play it better than most rock guitar players I've seen. That's because I took time years ago to learn to play other styles. Any style you learn will influence your own style.

Everything else he said is exactly right, especially the part about concentrating on a specific goal when practicing. I try to play at least an hour every day, often more. Often I just doodle, to keep my fingers in shape but when I have songs to learn for the band, I seriously work on those with just a little doodling now and then to get my mind off the songs for a bit. That helps too, you can only work hard at one thing for so long before you need to get into something else for a few minutes, otherwise it becomes a rut. At band practice we usually try not to spend more than about 20 minutes working on any one song, move on to other things, then come back to that one later in the night and work on it a little more.

Don't sweat the mistakes, remember them for future reference and keep playing. Go through the entire song, then go back and work on trouble areas.

The one most important thing for someone just starting out is learning a song. That keeps your interest up, and you have the satisfaction of knowing you actually can play a song. That's why rhythm guitar is the best way to start out. Worry about leads, scales and picking techniques once you learn to be a decent rhythm player. That's why his advice to stick to a goal is good, your goal starting out should be to play a song. That means usually learning 3 chords and getting proficient at changing from one to another so you can play that song. You don't even have to develop a great strumming technique...just learn to stumble through one song so you know you can do it. Then go from there...then worry about strumming technique, more difficult songs, more chord changes, barre chords, fingering exercises, picking techniques...but always keep a goal in mind and allow no distractions.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#23
i dunno guys noodling while watching tv is something i've done for years. it does keep the fingers limber. is it serious practice well no but it doesn't hurt at all. now i wouldn't recommend doing that to a beginner as at that point you really do need to concentrate on what you are dong. once you have a good idea of what you are doing then doing that is fine. i always amazed my ex by doing that as even if i wasn't really looking at the guitar if she asked whhere my finger were i could tell her and it was never wrong. i've come up with some of my best licks just dicking around infront of the tv.

having said all that concentrating is very important especially at the beginning. once you get to the point where you don't have to really think about it that's different. part of the goal as a player is to get to the point where you don't have to really think about it you just do it.
#24
I'll add my views for what it's worth.

You are obviously young and probably very keen, you can't fault that, but........ I have been playing for a year now, not very long but a lot longer than two weeks. I see a guitar teacher every two to three weeks, I don't feel that I'm yet in a position to give advice.

Don't forget there will be members of this forum that have been playing guitar all there lives. Perhaps they are better suited to giving advice rather than you with 2 weeks experience or me with 1 years experience.
#25
I've never seen those Friedman tips videos before.

They are good. I like Marty Friedman.

Are those videos on a DVD?
"When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. This is my religion." -- Abraham Lincoln
Last edited by Virgman at Mar 23, 2015,
#26
@Paleo Pete: The video clip that I've shared is actually an excerpt from an instructional video called Marty Friedman's Electric Guitar Day One. As the name suggests the instructional video is intended towards the absolute beginners who are just starting to play electric guitar (although he shared many information/tips/advices here that can also be applied for playing acoustic as well).

You are correct about expanding the boundary of music, exploring various areas and aspects of different style/genres, broadening the musical horizon and although he is stating in this video to stick with the music that one likes but Marty Friedman is a quite versatile player himself. He did this on purpose probably because he wanted the beginners to feel comfortable watching this (I also watch this and Marty performed few tunes in the full video which really inspires me) as I believe his guitar skill is no less scary that any other 80s guitarists of rock/metal scenario.

@Virgman: This instructional video was released in VHS and I'm not quite sure about the DVD release (probably it never happened).
#27
monwobobbo - That's pretty much my point. For a beginner, definitely eliminate all distractions and concentrate. I do the same as you, I can doodle while watching tv, but it's not what I consider practice, just keeping my fingers in shape. I definitely do not recommend it for beginners.


Luminance - I figured it was part of something more. I was pretty sure of what you said too, it's aimed at beginners, and as i said, I agree with him that beginners should allow no distractions and concentrate. I was exposed to rock, country, blues and folk as a kid, before getting into school band and the classical and jazz stuff there, as well as my mother listening to people like Frank Sinatra and Perry Como, my father had a couple of Pete Fountain and some big band records and such, so I had a pretty wide range of exposure at a really early age, all the while getting more and more into rock and roll. I always recommend that kind of exposure, but when originally learning any instrument, stick to what you like. Branch out once you can actually play without having to fully concentrate on it.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#28
Quote by Paleo Pete
monwobobbo - That's pretty much my point. For a beginner, definitely eliminate all distractions and concentrate. I do the same as you, I can doodle while watching tv, but it's not what I consider practice, just keeping my fingers in shape. I definitely do not recommend it for beginners.


Luminance - I figured it was part of something more. I was pretty sure of what you said too, it's aimed at beginners, and as i said, I agree with him that beginners should allow no distractions and concentrate. I was exposed to rock, country, blues and folk as a kid, before getting into school band and the classical and jazz stuff there, as well as my mother listening to people like Frank Sinatra and Perry Como, my father had a couple of Pete Fountain and some big band records and such, so I had a pretty wide range of exposure at a really early age, all the while getting more and more into rock and roll. I always recommend that kind of exposure, but when originally learning any instrument, stick to what you like. Branch out once you can actually play without having to fully concentrate on it.


as i said i agree that beginers need to stay really focused. i just didn't want to discourage playing to the tv or whatever down the road as a bad thing it's not. i often kinda tune the tv out if i'm on to something playing wise.

listening to all sorts of music is definitely a good thing. checking out other styles of guitar playing i think is very important. however as a beginner you don't want to bite off morethan you can chew. i think marty was kid of hinting at that. playing what you love first keeps you motivated. down the road you can tart adding to that or even going down a different road. i try to write that way as well. occasionally i'll just pick something different and say ok how would i approach that. ( curse of the mummies tomb link in my profile is a good example)
#29
Surely you'd be better off with a metronome and going up and down a scale? Kill 3 birds with one stone.

I hope you keep the video, look back in 6mnths and have a chuckle at yourself
#30
Quote by monwobobbo
i dunno guys noodling while watching tv is something i've done for years. it does keep the fingers limber. is it serious practice well no but it doesn't hurt at all. now i wouldn't recommend doing that to a beginner as at that point you really do need to concentrate on what you are dong. once you have a good idea of what you are doing then doing that is fine. i always amazed my ex by doing that as even if i wasn't really looking at the guitar if she asked whhere my finger were i could tell her and it was never wrong. i've come up with some of my best licks just dicking around infront of the tv.

having said all that concentrating is very important especially at the beginning. once you get to the point where you don't have to really think about it that's different. part of the goal as a player is to get to the point where you don't have to really think about it you just do it.

That's the thing though, that's not practice, that's playing. You're not running exercises or anything like that, just playing along with TV themes or whatever. Not to downplay the importance of ear training and playing a lot and such, but it's really not the same thing as physical practice.

Quote by gweddle.nz
Surely you'd be better off with a metronome and going up and down a scale? Kill 3 birds with one stone.

Eh, wouldn't recommend just running scales either really, just playing scales up and down isn't of much use to most players so I would say that playing something actually properly musical to a metronome would be an infinitely better use of a person's time.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Mar 24, 2015,
#31
Your a super beginner video maker lol. I been learning 5 months and iam also a beginner,
Learn chords frist before u do all this,
#32
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
That's the thing though, that's not practice, that's playing. You're not running exercises or anything like that, just playing along with TV themes or whatever. Not to downplay the importance of ear training and playing a lot and such, but it's really not the same thing as physical practice.


Eh, wouldn't recommend just running scales either really, just playing scales up and down isn't of much use to most players so I would say that playing something actually properly musical to a metronome would be an infinitely better use of a person's time.


i understand what you are saying but that begs the ? "when does practice stop and actual playing begin" now honestly playing scales and such is one of the things i do while watching tv. why because it is tedious. the one difference is that i have the mechanics down already, things like picking aren't something i have to think about. of course that is because i already put in the practice time with that (and it took way more than a couple of months to get that down). just saying

agree that running scales gets pointless past warming up and memorizing them. putting the scale into actual use will be much more productive in the long run. i sometimes will learn some odd scale to pu in a song just to see how it will work. (i did this for my song Curse Of The Mummy's Tomb which is based on the hungarian minor scale for a middle eastern feel)
#33
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Eh, wouldn't recommend just running scales either really, just playing scales up and down isn't of much use to most players so I would say that playing something actually properly musical to a metronome would be an infinitely better use of a person's time.


I personally found it useful for developing the positioning of my right hand when moving up and down the strings as well as speed. Obviously you'll want to play some actual music before you die of boredom though!
#34
TC, you should not be practicing in front of the TV. Instead, you should turn the TV off and get a bottle of JD from the liquor store and a pack of menthols in order to practice for your future bar room gigs. You want the experience to be as close to the real thing as possible and that involves no television.
#35
Quote by monwobobbo
i understand what you are saying but that begs the ? "when does practice stop and actual playing begin"


We need a discussion on noodling, practice, jamming and structured playing. I also play almost continuously while watching TV, simply because the TV doesn't hold my attention sufficiently. - My grandmother used to knit. I would call it noodling. It does help maintain physical strength, dexterity and muscle memory, but maybe also generates bad habits. If I'm actually trying to learn something though, I go to my man cave and focus on it. I've found that once the muscle memory is there for the basic composition, I can manage timing and improv fairly easily while watching TV.
#36
Quote by Tony Done
We need a discussion on noodling, practice, jamming and structured playing. I also play almost continuously while watching TV, simply because the TV doesn't hold my attention sufficiently. - My grandmother used to knit. I would call it noodling. It does help maintain physical strength, dexterity and muscle memory, but maybe also generates bad habits. If I'm actually trying to learn something though, I go to my man cave and focus on it. I've found that once the muscle memory is there for the basic composition, I can manage timing and improv fairly easily while watching TV.


yeah i noodle a lot. having said that some of my best riffs have come out of noodling. i don't know about bad habits i just play and to a cetain degree since i don't plug in most of the time i have to pick fairly precisely or it sounds like shit. never gonna say that noodling is a subtitute for quality practice time just that it can be good for some of the thigs you mentioned.

yeah a discussion on when does pratice end and playing start could be very interesting. talking about jamming may be useful as well. haven't been able to do that for a while n i miss it.
#37
Quote by monwobobbo
i understand what you are saying but that begs the ? "when does practice stop and actual playing begin" now honestly playing scales and such is one of the things i do while watching tv. why because it is tedious. the one difference is that i have the mechanics down already, things like picking aren't something i have to think about. of course that is because i already put in the practice time with that (and it took way more than a couple of months to get that down). just saying

agree that running scales gets pointless past warming up and memorizing them. putting the scale into actual use will be much more productive in the long run. i sometimes will learn some odd scale to pu in a song just to see how it will work. (i did this for my song Curse Of The Mummy's Tomb which is based on the hungarian minor scale for a middle eastern feel)

See I make a differentiation between learning, practicing, and playing, and I think knowing the aims of each helps you make best use of your time.

Learning is exactly what it says on the tin: learning a new scale, learning a new song, whatever, the important thing is that there is new information or a new physical skill being introduced. At this point the important thing is to get the most basic implementation of the idea down: scale shapes, notes, beats, that kind of thing. Generally I reckon this is going to be tempo-less practice because you need to think about what you're doing because you've never done it at all before.

Practice is working on or with a skill, song, or whatever that you already know, and improving the way you play it. Tempo is going to be dependent on what you're practising, could be anything from tempo-less to trying to push the high end of what you can do. The important part is that it's focused on improving your skills beyond where you are now. Physically speaking that's going to be working on relaxing, moving less, all that jazz.

Playing is playing something you already know and not specifically working on improvement. This is things like playing along to backing tracks, playing songs you already know, noodling and seeing what comes out, whatever.

At least this is the way I characterise different kinds of playing, and I'm well aware that any and all of the three above may improve your playing in any number of ways... but I think the aim of each does change the conditions under which you should do them and the way you approach what you're doing.
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#39
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
See I make a differentiation between learning, practicing, and playing, and I think knowing the aims of each helps you make best use of your time.

Learning is exactly what it says on the tin: learning a new scale, learning a new song, whatever, the important thing is that there is new information or a new physical skill being introduced. At this point the important thing is to get the most basic implementation of the idea down: scale shapes, notes, beats, that kind of thing. Generally I reckon this is going to be tempo-less practice because you need to think about what you're doing because you've never done it at all before.

Practice is working on or with a skill, song, or whatever that you already know, and improving the way you play it. Tempo is going to be dependent on what you're practising, could be anything from tempo-less to trying to push the high end of what you can do. The important part is that it's focused on improving your skills beyond where you are now. Physically speaking that's going to be working on relaxing, moving less, all that jazz.

Playing is playing something you already know and not specifically working on improvement. This is things like playing along to backing tracks, playing songs you already know, noodling and seeing what comes out, whatever.

At least this is the way I characterise different kinds of playing, and I'm well aware that any and all of the three above may improve your playing in any number of ways... but I think the aim of each does change the conditions under which you should do them and the way you approach what you're doing.


i was with you until you get to PLAYING. you kind of contradict yourself. playing doesn't necessarily mean playing something you know per se. noodling often is just random and you may hit on something you've never played before. i don't think that "playing" is a black and white kinda thing. when working on writing a song you could (or at least should ) be learning something (writing songs) you certainly have to practice to get the song down and yet you are playing. this is why i see a grey area between practicing and playing. in some respects you have to practice just playing. i'd also say there comes a point where you really don't "practice" in the traditional sense as much as just explore through playing. i do this a lot.
#40
Quote by monwobobbo
i was with you until you get to PLAYING. you kind of contradict yourself. playing doesn't necessarily mean playing something you know per se. noodling often is just random and you may hit on something you've never played before. i don't think that "playing" is a black and white kinda thing. when working on writing a song you could (or at least should ) be learning something (writing songs) you certainly have to practice to get the song down and yet you are playing. this is why i see a grey area between practicing and playing. in some respects you have to practice just playing. i'd also say there comes a point where you really don't "practice" in the traditional sense as much as just explore through playing. i do this a lot.


This is just getting pedantic. You play anytime your guitar makes a noise while it's in your hands. You technically practice every time you play.

My self, and most people I know can differentiate from 'playing' and 'practicing'.

Like if you are a football player you practice drills and shit, then you scrimmage ie: play' The whole time you're still at football practice. Generally you learn more scrimmaging WITH OTHER PLAYERS, but if you didn't practice you have dropped the catch before you could even run with it.

You know what he meant, there is no reason to break it down like he sued you. lol
Last edited by Treyvius at Mar 25, 2015,
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