#1
http://imgur.com/vuaZcUL,pjYYnXK#0

http://imgur.com/vuaZcUL,pjYYnXK#1

I got this guitar a few months ago. I didn't play around with it too much because I ended up getting another one I preferred. I wasn't using it so I decided to sell it. Some guy saw my ad and came over to my house yesterday. He tried it and mentioned that the guitar doesn't stay in tune. The guy seemed to have a really good ear and he tuned it perfectly, only to realize that 2-3 minutes later it was already out of tune.

So last night I got this tuner app for my smartphone and proceeded to try to tune it perfectly. It was pretty much impossible. I would tune 1 string at a time starting with the lowest only to discover that by the time I was done with the last string, the first one was already out of tune. Since this is a Floydrose and tuning one string may affect the others, I thought I may simply have to repeat the process a few times to finally have them all in tune. I must have done this for half an hour. The guitar simply won't stay in tune, and when using the tremolo, the tuning degrades even faster. I tried tuning it by using the things on the head of the guitar, and also by using the little screws on the bridge (I'm sorry I don't know what either of these are called), and neither worked.

Is there a way to fix this problem?
#2
Welcome to owning a Floyd Rose and complaining that its a pain in the ass to set up club. Pull up a chair!

You obviously didn't know what you were getting yourself into when you bought the guitar and you really should've done more research.

Read this thread.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=614226

There could be any number of things that are causing the problems you're describing. With a fully floating Floyd Rose-style bridge, adjusting the tuning of one string, WILL affect the tuning of the other strings. The springs in the back of the guitar are going to try to compensate for the tension you're adding to the bridge by tunings a string up, making the other strings go flat. Its frustrating for people unfamiliar with Floyd Rose bridges. One way you can help correct this problem is by blocking the floyd by inserting a block of material into the back of the guitar, behind the block of the floyd, that is sized in such a way that when inserted, the bridge sits perfectly level to the body. Then tune the guitar up normally. The next thing you do is remove the block, and adjust the spring claw in the back of the guitar so that the bridge sits level again and the strings are in tune.

That setup sticky thread explains this with some illustrations.

Also remember to lock the locking nut down if you want to use the bar. Otherwise your guitar will go out of tune when you use it.

Also remember to stretch the strings out (if you haven't already) before locking the locking nut down or else your guitar will probably go out of tune.

It is a good idea to lubricate the knife edges of the bridge before you do any setting up of the guitar, as it helps to reduce friction being imparted as the bridge hinges on the bridge posts. And lubricating those knife edges can improve tuning stability.

Never adjust the action of the guitar (if you need to) with the strings under full tension. It wrecks the knife edges.

If you don't understand what any of these things are that I'm referring to, read the FR sticky. Or go on google and search for the anatomy of a Floyd Rose bridge. Or alternatively google for how to set up a Floyd Rose because there are literally thousands of videos on youtube that cover the topic.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Mar 21, 2015,
#3
did you stretch the strings out properly? are you using the locking nut? are you tuning the strings in the correct order to balance the strings? 623451. Is the bridge level?

one last thing - is the neck straight or overbowed?
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#4
Quote by Reds3031
did you stretch the strings out properly?

This is indeed the problem in many cases. Especially after not having played with those strings for a long time you need to stretch them good several times and then tune them.
Consult this website http://www.ibanezrules.com/new/index.htm
and rule out all the other possibilities before determining it's actually broken. Good luck!
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#5
Thanks for all the replies. I will look into all your suggestions.

One thing I'm wondering is how much of this detuning is normal after using the tremolo and how much of it might be caused by some defect at the bridge level.

Basically what I'm wondering is, how long is a fully, 100% functional FR bridge supposed to keep its pitch under heavy use of the tremolo? Let's say somebody is playing a solo and every 10-15 seconds he's using the tremolo. How long will a perfect pitch last under normal circumstances?
#6
Quote by clem84
Thanks for all the replies. I will look into all your suggestions.

One thing I'm wondering is how much of this detuning is normal after using the tremolo and how much of it might be caused by some defect at the bridge level.

Basically what I'm wondering is, how long is a fully, 100% functional FR bridge supposed to keep its pitch under heavy use of the tremolo? Let's say somebody is playing a solo and every 10-15 seconds he's using the tremolo. How long will a perfect pitch last under normal circumstances?

Provided that everything is set up ideally, the guitar should stay in tune forever.

Of course in the real world, There are other factors that affect tuning, such as thermal expansion, gravity, string deterioration, among other things. But I don't think those are the problems you're having.

Detuning with use of the bar isn't something you should be experiencing though. That is usually caused by either the guitar not being set up correctly, or there being some mechanical problem with the bridge. The most common mechanical problem (especially with cheap Floyds) is the wearing of the knife edges over time, due to the materials used to construct the bridge not being strong enough to withstand string tension, against the Floyd pivot posts.

I'd advise that you take the bridge off the guitar and inspect the knife edges. If they're dull or gnarled up, then that is the culprit of your poor tuning stability. And if that is the case, you will have to buy a new Floyd Rose bridge.

Another common problem is the string slipping through the locking nut. And this is caused by the locking plates not being tight enough. Cheap floyds typically come with crappy locking nuts that strip out easily and they need to be replaced.

There's also the quirk with Floyd Rose bridges in which bending a string will cause the other strings to detune. Which is problematic when doing double-bends, as the static note will go flat until the bend is released. This problem is just part of the nature of Floyd Rose bridges, and the only real solution is to either completely block off the bridge, removing all of it's functionality, using much heavier strings to lessen the effect, or setting up the floyd to dive-only and cranking up the strings in the back of the guitar to the point that the springs keep the bridge from moving forward when bending.
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