#1
Hi everyone, my question is what is the technique or effect they use for shifting to pinch harmonic while soloing? Here are some examples of the technique/effect i'm asking:

Lynyrd Skynyrd - That Smell 0:16
Judas Priest - Deceiver 1:37

I'll come up with more examples if I can remember.
#2
Can't hear it on Judas Priest but probably a digitech Whammy or could be a Floyd rose whammy bar
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#3
Neither of them sounded like pinch harmonics at all. That Smell sounds like just bending a note with the sound starting to fade and thin out and it sounds like itis on the edge of feedback. The Priest song sounded just like a bend up the neck with a subtle wah pedal sound.

Quote by Guitar137335
Can't hear it on Judas Priest but probably a digitech Whammy or could be a Floyd rose whammy bar


Somehow I highly doubt that they were using a Digitech Whammy in the 70s.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Mar 22, 2015,
#4
i tried to do it with feedback but when I bend the note feedback pitch doesn't change?
#5
Depends what kind of feedback it is; on the Skynyrd song that's the kind of feedback that you get from using a cranked amp with the right amount of gain and standing in the right place in the room. It's generated when the sound from the amp is loud enough and at the right frequency to keep the string vibrating rather than just being from too much gain and no noise gate. Same with the Priest track now that I've listened to the part you're talking about.

Feedback like that is an art form unto itself, sadly, and takes a lot of experimentation to get working. Even then if you change room or guitar or amp settings or anything you might knock something out that you need to get that sound. If you watch something like Steve Vai's performance from the G3 1996 video (the Eric Johnson one) you'll see that his feedback solo is clearly so so tightly planned and laid out, I dread to think how much messing about that took to get right in every venue every night.

He starts it about a minute in to this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDZuNM3HmU4

And it is magnificent and insane.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Mar 23, 2015,
#6
That's a common theme among skynyrd songs, especially Gary Rossington's parts and like others have said it's difficult to get right, but you can see Gary doing it in many of the videos.
#7
It's the most beautiful thing in the world when you get it just right. I got some open notes to ring out for about 10 minutes one time. Like I put the guitar on the floor and went to the bathroom and it was still going.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#8
Quote by theogonia777
It's the most beautiful thing in the world when you get it just right. I got some open notes to ring out for about 10 minutes one time. Like I put the guitar on the floor and went to the bathroom and it was still going.

The right kind of musical feedback will last as long as the power to your amp does Functionally it's infinite, but you do have to be in the right place and playing the right note for it to work.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.