#1
I own a fender strat with stock singe coil pickups. The tremolo was set flat against the body when I got it. I wish to use the whammy bar now, but I also need better sustain. Is it achievable by set up or through electronics like a pedal?
I currently play on my Yamaha THR10 AMP.
#2
A new tremolo block might help.
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#3
using your trem won't affect your sustain all that much. yes a steel block will help (US made ones already have this). now in terms of sustain what kind of amp settings are you using? the amp you have may be able to only deliver so much as it is just a little practice amp.

what kind of stuff are you playing?
#4
An OD or compressor might help, but as the other said it's all on the guitar and amp for the most part. Nothing helps more than a good setup, good guitar parts and a good amp.
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#5
Haha ya I will be solving the issue of amp soon. Gonna be buying Marshall JCM 2000 I guess that would solve the problem of sustain.
#6
Quote by 40xxx04
Haha ya I will be solving the issue of amp soon. Gonna be buying Marshall JCM 2000 I guess that would solve the problem of sustain.


it won't solve the acoustic sustain. an amp doesn't help with that.

but an OD or compressor would through the amp. but you still won't have the natural acoustic sustain.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#7
Like others mentioned you can add a new trem block or new bridge altogether, you can set pickups slightly higher, you can use pedals but it's all just a cover for otherwise lousy guitars and amps. Most people you play for wouldn't know the difference but us as guitarists probably would.

I have this thing called a fat finger that's basically a heavy brass piece that clamps onto the headstock. It very subtly increases sustain, but it's especially good for drawing out harmonics and undertones. I've played for so long with it that when i take it off the guitar feels pretty different and a lot of notes don't resonate or sing as well as im used to.
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#8
I'm wondering if the pickups might be too close to the strings, magnets are pulling on them and killing sustain.

Does the guitar have decent sustain to begin with unplugged? That's the first thing I listen for when I look at buying a guitar. If it doesn't sound good unplugged, I move on to another one, I won't be happy with it plugged in. My Squier strat resonates on some notes unplugged, most guitars will if you listen close. Most good ones anyway. Sustain plugged into a clean amp is excellent. Same for my Peavey Patriot, but if I raise the pickups high enough the Patriot will start to lose sustain. It has a lot hotter pickups than the strat though. The pickup magnets can pull on the strings and actually reduce sustain, by trying to keep them in one area of their normal vibrational pattern, which is similar to a jump rope.

Dead strings? If the strings are more than 2 months old and you play every day, change strings before worrying about anything else, then see how it does.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#9
Quote by Paleo Pete
I'm wondering if the pickups might be too close to the strings, magnets are pulling on them and killing sustain.

Does the guitar have decent sustain to begin with unplugged? That's the first thing I listen for when I look at buying a guitar. If it doesn't sound good unplugged, I move on to another one, I won't be happy with it plugged in. My Squier strat resonates on some notes unplugged, most guitars will if you listen close. Most good ones anyway. Sustain plugged into a clean amp is excellent. Same for my Peavey Patriot, but if I raise the pickups high enough the Patriot will start to lose sustain. It has a lot hotter pickups than the strat though. The pickup magnets can pull on the strings and actually reduce sustain, by trying to keep them in one area of their normal vibrational pattern, which is similar to a jump rope.

Dead strings? If the strings are more than 2 months old and you play every day, change strings before worrying about anything else, then see how it does.


good thoughts. i also kinda wonder what exactly is meant by more sustain. single coils aren't gong to give you the type of sustain that a humbucker will and that may be part of the problem if that is what you mean by sustain.
#10
Quote by Paleo Pete
I'm wondering if the pickups might be too close to the strings, magnets are pulling on them and killing sustain.

Does the guitar have decent sustain to begin with unplugged? That's the first thing I listen for when I look at buying a guitar. If it doesn't sound good unplugged, I move on to another one, I won't be happy with it plugged in. My Squier strat resonates on some notes unplugged, most guitars will if you listen close. Most good ones anyway. Sustain plugged into a clean amp is excellent. Same for my Peavey Patriot, but if I raise the pickups high enough the Patriot will start to lose sustain. It has a lot hotter pickups than the strat though. The pickup magnets can pull on the strings and actually reduce sustain, by trying to keep them in one area of their normal vibrational pattern, which is similar to a jump rope.

Dead strings? If the strings are more than 2 months old and you play every day, change strings before worrying about anything else, then see how it does.


big +1 the natural sustain of the guitar really makes a huge difference, and is the first thing i check out with a new guitar. i always play unamplified and see how i like it before plugging it in.

also the pickup height can really hinder your sustain if they are too close. i would get new strings on there and adjust the pickup height.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#11
I always play a guitar unplugged first, if I don't like it I never bother to plug it in. I guess it takes doing it for a few years, but I can tell if it sounds good and has good sustain playing unplugged.

Single coils...do get good sustain, if the guitar itself does. My main guitar is a Squier Strat, I'm always impressed by the sustain it gets when I play it. Noticed it today plugged in to the Champ. I had to spray some contact cleaner into the Arion Analog Delay a few days ago, been using it to practice, makes the amp sound great, the way I set it I get very similar to using a reverb, almost no noticeable attack on the echo, and sustain is even better.

But if the guitar itself didn't have good sustain to begin with, nothing would help.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#12
+1 to everything that's been said so far. I'll just add technique as something to look into. Assuming there isn't an issue with your equipment proper technique can go a long way towards increasing your sustain.
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