#1
The following is a link sample from a 1970 film soundtrack of what I believe to be rockabilly.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Koz2z4GitY

The film's music producer was Richard Podolor who wrote "Joy to the World" for Three Dog Night.

I was stricken with awe when I heard the music in this film score. I am so awe-struck, that I want to study this music more in depth.

The questions:

1. is this rockabilly music or some other genre?

2. note the lead guitar in the music: this particular lead guitar has a distinctive nasal twang or buzz, what kind of instrument is it?

Could a Fender Tele or some other guitar make this particular tone?
If I were to go to a music store, what should I specify in an instrument so as
to be able to replicate the music in the film score with accuracy provided
proper playing technique is employed?

I personally think these tones are up the ally of Amerca's oldest guitar, Gretsch!!

3. What is the technique for playing a guitar in this fashion?
Can an acoustic guitar be made to play a similar timbre?

Probably not?

4. Is mastering an acoustic six-string guitar an absolute necessity before
venturing into an electric? I have monkeyed around with cheap nylon six-strings before
and they are absolutely murder on the tips my bare fingers to finger chords and notes.
I gather playing an electric only requires a lighter fingering touch that is less punishing on the fingers and the electric guitar has a much broader repertoire than an acoustic.

I like many more of the sounds that can possibly emanate from an electric instrument. An acoustic guitar seems largely boring to me.

I love stringed instruments with a pronounced nasal tone, buzz and/or twangy-ness in timbre especially in country western and rockabilly along with some reverb or echo in some numbers as in rock n roll, country western, southern rock or rockabilly music. Therefore I am also especially fond of banjo and harpsichord tones with their light crispness. Sometimes, I like bass string instruments with a hint of nasal or buzz too and this can be done with electric bass. I love tremolo and vibrato too in some songs. I gather it requires certain electronic equipment and/or playing technique to get this kind of buzz tonal effect as from electric guitars and basses.

Duane Eddy had the philosophy that if the music don't twang, it don't mean a thang. I have this same philosophy about guitars in several genres of popular music.

One famous reverb twang I like is the solo riff in You Got Lucky, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

Here is a compilation of WHAT I THINK to be the coolest guitar sounds ever!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObY1YfDz7-8&feature=youtu.be

If I were to take up guitar, this is what I would aspire to try to sound like. I seems like I need some kind of Gretsch hollow-body to get those exact bold country-western "cowboy music" timbres. Often these guitars are soloed in their lower (bass) register. Perhaps like the White Falcons of Stephen Stills and Neil Young in Buffalo Springfield. They feature TV Jones Classic pickups. Those beautiful birds are just way too expensive: too rich for my blood. It would be nice if I could pick up a decent Gretch hollow-body for a couple hundred bucks on Craigslist Classifieds.

What about the cheaper new G5120 Electromatic that rivals the more expensive G6120 (Chet Atkins)?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PR0vESxtsCs

I could even swap in some TV Jones Classics to get more of that "fuzzy buzz" tone I seek.
I don't like the peal of "bell-ring" tone much in guitars.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrvxyW_O-v8

Now, TV Jones is more like it!! Mellow, fuzzy-buzzy tone!

What do all you good people think?

Any idiot can buy any guitar and can learn some kind of music.

But my guitar has to be able to produce certain tones to sound like something special.

You can buy a Honda Rebel if you want basic transportation.
You can buy a Harley-Davidson if you want something fun and enjoyable.

Perhaps, a Gretsch is the Harley-Davidson of guitars.
Fender is just a Ford Focus and Gibson is just a Chevy Aveo by analogy.
John Cavender
Last edited by JohnCavender at Mar 26, 2015,
#2
I would say it's country music.

I think it's played on a Tele, yeah.

No, you don't have to master the acoustic before moving to electric. I mean, then nobody would be able to play electric because I'm pretty sure nobody has really mastered the acoustic.

Start playing electric if you feel like it. You don't have to start on an acoustic.

If acoustic seems boring to you, start playing the electric.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
I was actually going to say that the songs sound like a hollow body guitar. The original one has overdrive so it won't sound like that by itself.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#4
I started on electric for about 4-5 years before moving to acoustic. There is absolutely no reason why you shouldn't just start on the one you prefer. Acoustics are easier to play chords and fingerpick on and don't require other gear, while electrics are easier to fret and have more comfortable, slimmer necks.
And don't be so eager to knock acoustics, you've probably only heard general strumming on them and that's why you find them boring. Guys like Tommy Emmanuel, Andy Mckee and Jon Gomm are proof that the acoustic guitar is not boring (subjectively speaking of course). I'm sure at some point you'll find an appreciation for both instruments, so for now just go with what you like.
#5
You don't really need a Telecaster or a hollowbody or anything to play this kind of music. Almost any guitar will work, some will just work a bit better. It also has to do with your amp. But you don't need to replicate the tone that accurately to play the song.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
I enjoy playing acoustic every bit as much as electric. But I don't play acoustic as a "strumming" instrument ... I'll solo with it ... I love the dynamics it provides.

Also, it can be a great tool for practising technique, as typically it's harder to play scales, chords etc.

cheers, Jerry
#7
Quote by MaggaraMarine
You don't really need a Telecaster or a hollowbody or anything to play this kind of music. Almost any guitar will work, some will just work a bit better. It also has to do with your amp. But you don't need to replicate the tone that accurately to play the song.


Replicating certain tones is precisely what I want to do.

I want to choose a musical instrument based on what specific tones it can put out.

If I hear a tone in a movie soundtrack, for example, I would want to copy it as closely as possible.

here are some samples of TONES art the following link I want to reproduce as closely as possible:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObY1YfDz7-8&feature=youtu.be
John Cavender
#8
A bunch of these 60s theme songs were probably played by Tommy Tedesco of the Wrecking Crew. Check out his stuff on youtube. Most were played on a Tele or 335.

Clue: To really capture Tommy's tone and vibe you will probably need his fingers.
He was one of the best:

http://www2.gibson.com/news-lifestyle/features/en-us/tommy-tedesco-guitar-player-0416-2012.aspx
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#9
Reproducing tones is the least of your worries, you need to learn to play the thing first. Even if you have the exact same equipment you'll be sorely disappointed with how little it sounds like the sound you wanted without the skills to use it properly.

And that's before you get into all the recording techniques that are sometime nigh on impossible to replicate live. Tone chasing is a dead end, and a very expensive one at that! If you've got the resources there's obviously no harm in indulging yourself, but its way down on the list of priorities when yo cant actually play yet.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
Quote by Cajundaddy
A bunch of these 60s theme songs were probably played by Tommy Tedesco of the Wrecking Crew. Check out his stuff on youtube. Most were played on a Tele or 335.

Clue: To really capture Tommy's tone and vibe you will probably need his fingers.
He was one of the best:

http://www2.gibson.com/news-lifestyle/features/en-us/tommy-tedesco-guitar-player-0416-2012.aspx


I doubt that Tommy would have played in a cheap B-rated cult biker horror movie like Bigfoot which had a budget of only $50,000 in 1969. I am even surprised that Richard Podolor was even hired and paid to score that dog. The thing that shines in Bigfoot is John Carradine and Podolor's musical score even with a Hammond organ in the mix.

Vic Flick, not Tedesco, played that famous low-register dang-duh-duh-duh-dang-dong "surf music" guitar riff theme on James Bond 007 films starting with Dr. No! in 1962 that we are all too familiar with. That is a signature old-time bold guitar sound.
John Cavender
Last edited by JohnCavender at Mar 30, 2015,
#11
Quote by JohnCavender
I doubt that Tommy would have played in a cheap B-rated cult biker horror movie like Bigfoot which had a budget of only $50,0000 in 1969. I am even surprised that Richard Podolor was even hired and paid to score that dog. The thing that shines in Bigfoot is John Carradine and Podolor's musical score even with a Hammond organ in the mix.


Haha, Tedesco played on everything back then. If they had a score and some cash he was in it. He and Podolor worked together on projects often in LA but you rarely saw Tommy listed in the credits. For all we know Podolor played on Bigfoot as Surf guitar was kinda his thing. Much of the soundtracks you find interesting were indeed Tedesco.

http://www.rockabilly.nl/references/messages/richard_podolor.htm
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#12
Quote by Cajundaddy
Haha, Tedesco played on everything back then. If they had a score and some cash he was in it. He and Podolor worked together on projects often in LA but you rarely saw Tommy listed in the credits. For all we know Podolor played on Bigfoot as Surf guitar was kinda his thing. Much of the soundtracks you find interesting were indeed Tedesco.

http://www.rockabilly.nl/references/messages/richard_podolor.htm



In the "Bigfoot" film credits on screen:

Music written, produced and scored by Richard A. Podolor

Sound Engineer, William Cooper

Recorded at American Recording Studio, Studio City, California


It might have been Dickie himself (or his brother Don?) on lead guitar?
I wonder what guitar brand was played on the soundtrack?

I am sure any classic Gretsch h/b or maybe even a Gibson ES 335 can be cooked up by a custom shop or guitar shop for that sound. I am thinking TVJC pups are my best bet.
John Cavender
Last edited by JohnCavender at Mar 27, 2015,
#13
Quote by steven seagull
Reproducing tones is the least of your worries, you need to learn to play the thing first. Even if you have the exact same equipment you'll be sorely disappointed with how little it sounds like the sound you wanted without the skills to use it properly.

And that's before you get into all the recording techniques that are sometime nigh on impossible to replicate live. Tone chasing is a dead end, and a very expensive one at that! If you've got the resources there's obviously no harm in indulging yourself, but its way down on the list of priorities when yo cant actually play yet.


Of course, original music tones in movies or in recordings can always be replicated on a record player, tape player, CD player, DVD player or mp3 player.

I am sure I would love a classic hollowbody Gretsch w/ TVJ pups even though it might not quite be "the same". It should produce my favorite timbres close enough.

I think if we love the tone of our musical instruments we are more motivated to practice and learn more about playing them. It takes the drudgery out of practicing our otherwise boring "scales and arpeggios". I would never want to take up violin or tuba because those d_mn things sound infernal in a new student's hands.

A good analogy is learning to shoot skeet with a shotgun. If the damn thing kicks hard or is uncomfortable when mounted, we will not have any incentive to practice and get good at shooting.

A musical instrument that feels uncomfortable in our hands or that is downright tortuous to our eardrums and/or bodies will soon collect dust in a closet or be put up for sale on Craigslist.
John Cavender
Last edited by JohnCavender at Mar 27, 2015,