#1
I'm currently in the very early stages of building a home studio, and would like some opinions on a few things. The design is still very flexible at the moment, the only things set in stone are that it will be a room within a room, on a concrete slab foundation. Its also going to be in the middle of nowhere, so I'm not worried about outside noise getting through so much.

The maximum dimensions need to stay below 25' in length or width, and 12' in height. I'm hearing from multiple sources that you really don't want to go below 12' on the height, and I'll take their word for it. I know cubes, rectangles, and parallel walls are bad, and I know walls that are multiples of the same number is bad (like 14'x7', etc).

So this leads me into the big question, which is room shape and size. I've been experimenting with different shapes on paper, but I know so little about this I'm basically just blindly guessing my way through this. I'm looking for any advice on this issue, or even if you've been in a good sounding studio and can roughly remember dimensions is helpful too. I don't mind building a carbon copy of a good sounding studio. This is just for personal use anyway. The minimum requirements for said studio has to be acoustically sound for guitar, bass guitar, and drums. The drums are a must, a big reason I'm building this is so my drummer has a place to record that doesn't sound like crap. I play all genres of music, so.

Generally any advice on this would be helpful, and specifically room dimension advice. I pretty much know how I'm going to do the construction and with what materials, its the design I'm flopping around on. Thanks guys.
#2
You generally don't want any 2 dimensions of the room to be the same length, or be a double. For example,

12 x 12 x 14 would be bad (12 = 12)

12 x 7 x 24 would be bad (24 is double 12)

But, that being said, whatever your situation is, as long as you do proper acoustic treatment in the corners (stone wool and/or owens corning 703) you will be able to fix the acoustics.

DO NOT.

DO NOT.

DO NOT.

DO NOT BUY AURALEX STUDIO FOAM.

It is a scam. Auralex does NOTHING to any frequencies below ~500 hz. They RUIN the acoustics of your room and make it sound boomy as hell. Auralex's success is a marketing scam. It is way more expensive and not nearly as effective as a do-it-yourself stone wool treatment.

Make an account on these forums and then read this particular post about stone wool bass traps and broadband panels:

http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=15305

You have to make an account to see the images is why I say make an account.
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Last edited by BV-95 at Mar 24, 2015,
#3
I was under the impression certain ratios are always better than other ratios, disregarding the cubic ratios, etc that are always terrible. But are you saying as long as the room isn't one of these no - no ratios, it should sound decent with proper acoustic treatment?
#4
Quote by jlowe22
I was under the impression certain ratios are always better than other ratios, disregarding the cubic ratios, etc that are always terrible. But are you saying as long as the room isn't one of these no - no ratios, it should sound decent with proper acoustic treatment?



even if it is a no no ratio, you can make it work

Check out this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FuRiqoNRDmc
Fender MIM Strat HSS (DiMarzio Crunch Lab)
Peavey 6505+ 112

If you want, I can mix/master your tracks for free just so I can practice and who knows, maybe you'll love what you hear! Hit me up.
#5
Quote by BV-95


DO NOT.

DO NOT.

DO NOT.

DO NOT BUY AURALEX STUDIO FOAM.

It is a scam. Auralex does NOTHING to any frequencies below ~500 hz. They RUIN the acoustics of your room and make it sound boomy as hell. Auralex's success is a marketing scam. It is way more expensive and not nearly as effective as a do-it-yourself stone wool treatment.


Whoa there, buddy. At retail prices, yeah, it's a bust. That said, I got a buttload of the stuff for $100 and my room sounds great. There were 10 bass traps in my haul, and I was able to cover every reflection point, so it wasn't your average starter-kit purchase in excess of $1k, but it is definitely not useless or a scam.

It's overpriced and VERY expensive to fully outfit a room (at retail prices), but once you've got it all sorted out, it can absolutely sound great. You just can't buy $200 worth of 1x1 spot panels and think you're gonna make your mother's basement sound killer.

THAT said, don't buy any. Build your own traps. I just wanted to chime in because this stuff isn't useless, it's just overpriced.


FYI, OP, you're probably better off on a pro message board if you're literally building a room within a room. You will not find any experienced high budget advice on this board. I know GS can be nasty, but you'll probably do better lurking there than asking advanced questions here. I mean, hey, see where this thread leads, but after I get ripped apart for this comment there probably won't be too much useful advice that hasn't already been given.
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#6
Quote by Sid McCall
Whoa there, buddy. At retail prices, yeah, it's a bust. That said, I got a buttload of the stuff for $100 and my room sounds great. There were 10 bass traps in my haul, and I was able to cover every reflection point, so it wasn't your average starter-kit purchase in excess of $1k, but it is definitely not useless or a scam.

It's overpriced and VERY expensive to fully outfit a room (at retail prices), but once you've got it all sorted out, it can absolutely sound great. You just can't buy $200 worth of 1x1 spot panels and think you're gonna make your mother's basement sound killer.

THAT said, don't buy any. Build your own traps. I just wanted to chime in because this stuff isn't useless, it's just overpriced.


FYI, OP, you're probably better off on a pro message board if you're literally building a room within a room. You will not find any experienced high budget advice on this board. I know GS can be nasty, but you'll probably do better lurking there than asking advanced questions here. I mean, hey, see where this thread leads, but after I get ripped apart for this comment there probably won't be too much useful advice that hasn't already been given.


I'm searching for advice anywhere I can get it, this board is just one of the many places I've been. I've watched all the videos, read the books, I'm just now seeking opinions from people and I appreciate the replies.
#7
I'll second the John L Sayers forum linked above. John Sayers designs pro studios for a living - facilities into the hundreds of thousands of dollars and up. He participates there.

I'll also HIGHLY recommend a book:
http://www.amazon.ca/Home-Recording-Studio-Build-Like/dp/143545717X

It is very detailed but in fairly simple language with diagrams, photos, etc. It's fantastic. I have it. The author, Rod Gervais, also participates at the John Sayers form.

You'll also find a variety of construction engineers, acoustic engineers, etc.

And to the one question - there ARE certain ratios that are tried and true. You'll find them in the book, on the sayers forum, etc.

You've got a lot of space. Look into trying to set up a separate control room / live room setup.

With the amount of space and a clean slate, I'd also consider a room that is slightly pentagonal. This avoids parallel walls.

CT
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#8
Quote by axemanchris
I'll second the John L Sayers forum linked above. John Sayers designs pro studios for a living - facilities into the hundreds of thousands of dollars and up. He participates there.

I'll also HIGHLY recommend a book:
http://www.amazon.ca/Home-Recording-Studio-Build-Like/dp/143545717X

It is very detailed but in fairly simple language with diagrams, photos, etc. It's fantastic. I have it. The author, Rod Gervais, also participates at the John Sayers form.

You'll also find a variety of construction engineers, acoustic engineers, etc.

And to the one question - there ARE certain ratios that are tried and true. You'll find them in the book, on the sayers forum, etc.

You've got a lot of space. Look into trying to set up a separate control room / live room setup.

With the amount of space and a clean slate, I'd also consider a room that is slightly pentagonal. This avoids parallel walls.

CT


I actually have that book and am reading it now. And yes this is clean slate i haven't even formed up the slab yet.