#1
Hi, yeah so ive basically written a lot of chord progressions that i want to turn into songs.
They are pretty much all laid out in order and structure but i struggle to come up with Vocal melodies. I play and play these songs' progressions and try to imagine and sing different melody lines and i dont know if its just cause im not a singer or cause my imagination sucks but anything i come up with sounds sort of dull, used up, you know, the usual.
ive also tried recording the progressions and playing along with it to figure out melodies but its the same thing.

I really want the vocal melody to fuse with the harmony in my music, like it has to work really well together.

I used to sing along to the pop/rock/hiphop songs on the radio and tv since i was a little kid so i dont think its that it feels too awkward.
I got a solid understanding of theory, and a not great but usable ear.

So what are your approaches to writing good vocal melodies.
I guess its useless to ask really, cause it feels like it has to come from with in, intuition right?
Last edited by Ignore at Mar 26, 2015,
#2
Maybe come up with lyrics first. They'll give you a good idea of the rhythm and phrasing. The text kind of guides the melody.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
So, you just have a bunch of chord sheets. So what? You're approaching songwriting incorrectly. Get a good melody, get some kind of hook to lead the song and write the song around that. If you want the melody to fuse with the harmony, then sing melodies that are in key and focus on the chord tones, that's the easy part, but the fact of the matter is, you don't have a main melody that leads the song, and so you only have a few chords. One can easily make a song from four chords, but those four chords aren't the song. Reevaluate your methods, and it'll come easier.
#4
Yeah, I agree, melody first.

The things that make a chord progression interesting on its own are often things that make it hard to write a melody on top of. Chord changes restrict your options, melodically, which is why most (not all, but most) songs are written melody first. And if not first, then as early in the process as possible: don't go figuring out a chorus part, and a bridge part, and an out-tro, etc.

Melodies are possibly the hardest part of songwriting because they're the most intuitive part of the process. You can craft your way through chords.

The only advice I can give is to work on your fundamentals. Develop your ear, and practice transcribing melodies. Don't just sing along with whatever - develop your ear so you can hear things with pitch-accuracy. Transcribe melodies on your guitar. Rinse. Repeat. This is how you feed the creative beast.
#5
^ I don't know. Many songs have been written chords first, melody second. It's all about what works for you. But yeah, I think TS should try different methods. Try melody first. Try lyrics first.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
I'm all about melody first because total freedom. But to each their own I suppose.

And no. It's 1% inspiration, 99% re-writing and re-re-writing for hours until it's good.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#7
I generally don't write lyrics (the ones I come up with are abysmal) but this interests me as well. I'd say doing the chords first doesn't really say much about your song. I prefer getting a guitar part or a bassline first and going from there. I'm also curious how to write vocal melodies (one's that go with lyrics and can be sung easily enough). Is that supposed to be hard?
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#8
Quote by Jet Penguin

And no. It's 1% inspiration, 99% re-writing and re-re-writing for hours until it's good.


You and I have very different experiences of writing songs.

All of the songs I've written that have been any good have appeared to me, almost fully formed, with only some lyric-writing and a tiny bit of tweaking required. It feels almost like I'm discovering them, rather than writing them.

YMMV, and, evidently, does.

The thing about writing chords-first is that that makes writing the melody harder, because you have less freedom.
#9
Quote by HotspurJr
You and I have very different experiences of writing songs.

All of the songs I've written that have been any good have appeared to me, almost fully formed, with only some lyric-writing and a tiny bit of tweaking required. It feels almost like I'm discovering them, rather than writing them.

YMMV, and, evidently, does.

The thing about writing chords-first is that that makes writing the melody harder, because you have less freedom.

Same here....