#1
Hey all,

So I'm still busy ''studying'' melody. I'm trying to find out what makes a melody sound a particular way, for instance what kind of melodical structure makes for a celebral feeling etc.

What I've also noticed is when I listen to music (instrumental) it either has a well-constructed melody (question and answer melody, and there is a melody in the chorus that is repeated almost exactly the same throughout the complete song). Just like a vocal melody works. Example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJregFXh8EU

But so there also is the instrumental music that has a melody that doesn't work like a vocal melody, not at all. There is no repetition of any motif in some songs. Example:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3KjHpB72hA (Except for a couple of motifs that are repeated directly after each other and then never to be heard again).

Now I wonder, how do these work? Is it the more flashy playing? The harmony that is also lacking (a lot of) repetition? They both sound very good in their own right to me. But why does the second one work?
#2
Well, to me the second one has a lot more "improvised" feel to it. It is more progressive.

Why the second one works? Maybe it has a good flow - the ideas are connected to each other. Of course writing something like this is a lot harder because you need to come up with new ideas all the time - there is no repetition. And it still needs to sound like a whole piece, and not just like a bunch of ideas thrown together.

How do you write a piece like this? Well, start with something and let the ideas come naturally. Otherwise it may lack the flow.

I do prefer music that has a bit more repetition in it. If no section is repeated, it usually feels a bit like random ideas thrown together.

Also, it doesn't really have to do with melody, it has to do with structure.
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#3
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Also, it doesn't really have to do with melody, it has to do with structure.



Bingo. You need to study phrasing. Phrasing is the key to making memorable melodies.
#4
Quote by KG6_Steven
Bingo. You need to study phrasing. Phrasing is the key to making memorable melodies.

Phrasing is like how a guitarists makes a set of notes ''his'' set of notes, right? Like sliding into notes where other guitarists hammer onto them or bend to them? Or playing a set of notes on the G B E strings where another guitar player prefers the fatter sound of D G B strings?
#5
Quote by liampje
Phrasing is like how a guitarists makes a set of notes ''his'' set of notes, right? Like sliding into notes where other guitarists hammer onto them or bend to them? Or playing a set of notes on the G B E strings where another guitar player prefers the fatter sound of D G B strings?


Phrasing is many things. You could say phrasing is a combination of articulation, dynamics, feel and rhythm. It has to do with as you said, how you play the notes. If you use bends, sliding, legato. It also has to do with the dynamics, playing softly or loudly. It also has to do with articulation, if you are playing something staccato or letting it ring out, where you hit the string with the pick (closer to the bridge gives one sound, closer to the neck another sound), if you hit the string with a pick vs thumb vs nail etc. And it has to do with the rhythmic side of the phrase, meaning on what beat does the phrase start, what beats are accented in the phrase, what beats does the phrase leave out, what rhythm does the phrase have etc.

Phrasing is one of those elements of music that very much define the player. You can listen to a ton of players, but as soon as B.B king or David Gilmour gets played through the speaker, you know it is them. Because their phrasing is so recognizable.

Bingo. You need to study phrasing. Phrasing is the key to making memorable melodies.


I would take it a step further and argue that phrasing is the key to making music.
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Last edited by Sickz at Mar 27, 2015,
#7
Quote by Sickz
I would take it a step further and argue that phrasing is the key to making music.



Phrasing is the key to making good music.
#8
I've not been on this forum in years and I come back and Liampje is still here asking about theory of Steve Vai songs
#12
Quote by griffRG7321
I've not been on this forum in years and I come back and Liampje is still here asking about theory of Steve Vai songs

Lol, why is that a bad thing? I just listen to music I like and I try to analyse things I hear. I was always thought that a good melody has repetition and one or more motives. Then I listen to that tune and the opposite also sounds good, no repetition. It's just a thing I noticed...