#1
And you get it pretty wrong is it just a case of keep trying again and again?

I just learnt Speed Parade and thought it was in drop D!! To be fair though I actually got most of it right...just in the wrong places which tends to be the norm when I learn by ear.

Any tips to help make things a bit easier? This is pretty much all I'm doing now, my personal project to learn a load of songs by ear.
#2
All I can say is keep trying. I played Honky Tonk Women in standard tuning and found it really hard, I hated it, for 15 years. Then I found out quite by accident one day it's actually in open G...dead simple then...I've done that plenty times.

Usually though if it's in drop D I can figure it out pretty quick, soon as I go for that low note and it ain't there...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#3
Just keep trying, practice is the key to everything. Try to figure it out yourself, and then check a tab to see how close you got - just be sure to compare your way and the tab to see which one actually sounds right - tabs aren't always perfect.

As for playing it on the right place on the neck, if something feels like you're having to reach kinda far or jump around a lot try moving a few notes around on different strings, explore the options that are available and go with the one that makes the most sense. Also keep in mind that different strings have a slightly different sound, the high E string and the 14th fret of the D string sound pretty different, so that can help, but of course the 5th fret B string and the 9th fret G string can sound very similar, so you'll just have to use your judgement. The same thing applies with this - figure it out yourself, then check it against a tab and see which is better.
#4
When you're listening to the song, pull your headphones out of the jack a little bit. You know when you can just hear the empty soundinh background stuff? Use that to get a second view on what you're learning; sometimes you'll catch something you didnt before.
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#5
I'd say it i just a matter of keeping at it. I learned quite a few songs incorrectly (be it with tuning or the actual notes) before i became comfortable with learning by ear. Nowadays it's not that much of a problem.

The advice i have for you, if you haven't already, is get some sort of software that allows you to slow down/change pitch/set EQ for the track your learning from. Transcribe, Riffstation, Anytune, Amazing Slow Downer are some you might want to check out. It helps a lot when dealing with faster/more obscure stuff.
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#6
Iv done a few songs by ear and usually get the notes right but on the wrong position...either higher or lower.

I'm gonna keep at it tho, got 11 more songs to learn!! I have transcribe and a phone app called audipo too which is pretty sweet.

How do you guys go about learning solos by ear? I don't really "get" soloing but it's something I wanna learn.
#7
The position doesn't really matter. Many times you can't tell which position the guitarist originally played the solo in. You can just guess, unless you watch some live videos. But use the position that feels best. It may not even be the same position the lick was originally played in.

To learn solos by ear, I would suggest slowing them down. Fast runs can be really hard to figure out, even if you have a good ear. I think the best way to learn to play your own solos is to play/listen to other people's solos.
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#8
Quote by LTaces

How do you guys go about learning solos by ear? I don't really "get" soloing but it's something I wanna learn.


I learn to sing them along with the recording first, then without the recording, then learn it on my instrument.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#9
That's kind of how I have one guitar dedicated for Drop C (better than having 3 electrics in standard, right?). A couple days ago, I was messing around and I figured out the main riff to Rock Lobster. If I remember correctly, the original recording, the lower 2 strings are tuned to C and F, not C and G.

It was easy enough for me to figure out the rest of the song, but the ending's still a pain for me to get. I'm too lazy to tune the guitar between Drop C and C standard, so I'm working on figuring out a comfortable way to play it in Drop C.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#10
Yeah I'm pretty lazy when it comes to the kind of midway tunings..not standard but not flat either (ACDC I'm looking at you).

I tried starting to learn Aerosmiths Combination tonight. Man does it sound like a mess haha couldn't here anything clearly!