#1
I have been playing guitar for about 9 months now, and I've recently had to change the strings on my acoustic. After much difficulty with a jammed bridge pin (don't even want to go into that it's so embarrassing haha), I finally got the strings on - but for some reason, it feels like there's a lot of tension. The truss rod isn't accessible from the head (I have an Epiphone DR-100) like other guitars, so that's not really an option unless I can get to it through the body.

I measured the string height on the 14th fret (?) and got about 4-and-a-halfish-mm. Is that average?

Please respond. I'm still very much a noob.
"Tell me why they painted us with guilt. They said that we're not good enough; the only thing we're guilty of is never giving up!" -"Nothing Left to Lose (Acoustic)", by Woe, Is Me
Last edited by 14omnipotent at Mar 26, 2015,
#2
The first thing you have to do is get the neck relief right, if it isn't already. It will be accessible through the soundhole, and will require a metric hex wrench. I can't recall which size, maybe 5mm. The neck relief should be such that when the bass string is pressed down at the 1st and body (14th) frets, the gap between the string and the 6th fret is about the thickness of a business card. - Less than a credit card, more than a piece of paper.

4.5mm action height is way off. Mine is 1.6mm on the treble side, 2.5mm on the bass side - 2/32" and 3/32" in imperial , measured from the crown of the fret to the bottom of the string.
#3
Quote by Tony Done
The first thing you have to do is get the neck relief right, if it isn't already. It will be accessible through the soundhole, and will require a metric hex wrench. I can't recall which size, maybe 5mm. The neck relief should be such that when the bass string is pressed down at the 1st and body (14th) frets, the gap between the string and the 6th fret is about the thickness of a business card. - Less than a credit card, more than a piece of paper.

4.5mm action height is way off. Mine is 1.6mm on the treble side, 2.5mm on the bass side - 2/32" and 3/32" in imperial , measured from the crown of the fret to the bottom of the string.


Thanks! It seems that there isn't anything wrong with the neck relief then, I guess. Maybe it's just because the strings are new.
"Tell me why they painted us with guilt. They said that we're not good enough; the only thing we're guilty of is never giving up!" -"Nothing Left to Lose (Acoustic)", by Woe, Is Me
#4
Quote by 14omnipotent
Thanks! It seems that there isn't anything wrong with the neck relief then, I guess. Maybe it's just because the strings are new.
It has absolutely nothing to do with new strings

Measuring from the TOP of the 12th fret, to the BOTTOM of the low E-6 string, you should have a MAXIMUM of 3mm or 1/8", however you measure things where you are.

If a bridge pin jambs, there's a 99% chance the string ball end is wedged against it.

You cut the string off, leaving a couple of inches sticking up at the bridge. THEN, grab a pair of linesman's pliers and shove the string into the guitar!! That will release the pin.

Put some tape on the guitar or some cardboard on the guitar first, so you don't scratch it up if you slip.

The truss rod AFFECTS string height, but it is not to be used to set string height.

You set the relief first, then sand the string saddle down. (The white thingey that slips into the bridge).

There's a knack to sanding a saddle, and for easiest and best results, you get sticky back sandpaper and a sheet of plate glass, to keep the bottom of the saddle flat and straight.

Learn more here from Mr. Becker: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 27, 2015,
#5
The neck needs a slight amount of bow, that's what the truss rod adjusts. It's not for adjusting string height! Nut and saddle height are key to good action, especially nut height. You can also try lighter gauge strings and/or lower the tuning one step down (2 notes)and use a capo for standard tuning play.