#1
ok guys so ive started a thrash/groove band with some of my friends and i still have a crappy practice amp which can be barely made out on top of the drums. we have a gig coming up in about two weeks and i need a cheap loud amp that will do for that.

these are the amps that a music shop kinda near where i live has discounted at the moment:

randall rg75 g3
randall kh75
peavey vk 112
peavey vypyr 75

so which one of these would you choose? i live in kosovo and there arent many places that sell amps here, and this place im planning on going to is actually pretty far away. also i dont have a lot of money soooo i guess my choices are limited to these amps considering theyre discounted.
#3
If you're able to find the Vypyr Tube 60, that might be a better choice. Has pretty 6L6's in the power section. The 75 would work though. Not sure about the Randalls. The VK would need some upgrades to get it to performance standards.
#5
so i guess the vypyr is pretty loud? also does it sound very artificial when turned up? because i thought solid state amps did that
#6
Yes, they're loud. All of those amps should be loud. Solid state amps sound fine when turned up. Solid state amps with crappy digital modeling sound artificial and thin. If you played the VK and the Vypyr, I think you'd notice that the VK sounds much warmer and fuller than the Vypyr, but the Vypyr is a great amp.
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#7
If you're after a groove sound then the RG75 would be best IMO.
I'm guessing you want a Pantera type of sound? The VK won't do that(Since Dime used SS) and the Vypir won't as well(Since it only has tube amp modulations). IMP the KH is just a waste of money.
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You can call me wrong, 'cause
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Fly on, fly on
#8
If you have *A* gig coming up, I'd suggest borrowing or even renting.

Hell, I *still* have amps that are more absent than present, what with all the "friends" who borrow them for recording. Buying a new cheap but loud amp on short notice for a single gig really makes little sense. It's like buying a cheap but loud hooker; it may not even work very well for the intended purpose and you wouldn't want to be stuck with it in the long run.
#9
Quote by Fryderyczek
If you're after a groove sound then the RG75 would be best IMO.
I'm guessing you want a Pantera type of sound? The VK won't do that(Since Dime used SS) and the Vypir won't as well(Since it only has tube amp modulations). IMP the KH is just a waste of money.
I am fairly certain you can get trash tones with tube amps, and with both of those listed. Types of amplification influence the tone, but they don't determine it. Of course, if you wanted his exact tone, you would purchase whatever amp he used. The VK has a substantial amount of gain on tap, and the Vypyr models the sound, the tubes just amplify (in the 60's case), the 75 is solid state.

If TS is looking for Randall's legacy with Dimebag, then yeah the Randall RG75 G3 might be a good buy then. I have played the amp before (or the G2, not sure what the difference is), distortion is reasonably characteristic of such a legacy and for "groove" the cleans are okay.
Last edited by Will Lane at Mar 27, 2015,
#10
Quote by Will Lane
I am fairly certain you can get trash tones with tube amps, and with both of those listed. Types of amplification influence the tone, but they don't determine it. Of course, if you wanted his exact tone, you would purchase whatever amp he used. The VK has a substantial amount of gain on tap, and the Vypyr models the sound, the tubes just amplify (in the 60's case), the 75 is solid state.

If TS is looking for Randall's legacy with Dimebag, then yeah the Randall RG75 G3 might be a good buy then. I have played the amp before (or the G2, not sure what the difference is), distortion is reasonably characteristic of such a legacy and for "groove" the cleans are okay.

I wasn't really talking about thrash in my post.
Well, you can call me crazy
You can call me wrong, 'cause
See I was born a liar, albatross
Fly on, fly on
#11
I wouldn't buy an amp for a gig, but if I were to buy an amp then I would buy the one that sounds the best to you.

Dumb answer, right?!

Well, the problem with guitarists is they are always wanting, "an amp that will go over the drums," and for that you are going to need a pretty damned loud amp.

Why not think a bit differently and consider renting a small PA and toy around with that for a few days before/after your gig?

Having a little monitor system for your practice room is a good idea, and can overcome the, "need it louder than the drums" problem. A lot of that is your room, too, btw. I used to play in a finished basement with padded carpets and a dropped cieling, and never had a problem with volume. Plaster walls, virtually no reverb. With the room factored out pretty much anything I played worked at a reasonable volume.

More bands use the Peavey equipment, 5150 or similar line has a long history in rock/metal. Played a 5150ii myself for many years. GREAT lead tone, loved it. Rhythm tone? Meh.. Dumped it when I got out of my band (as lead guitarist) and started in on my own solo project.

now I use a modeling amp: Vox VT40+, but that's because I play rhythm, lead, bass, clean, might want a jazz guitar solo, maybe some blue, as a solo artist I want options.

I gave up tone, though. If I want it loud I mic it.

I don't really play live, either. For live I'd probably rent something, or borrow. Most recently I played an acoustic set, so no amp necessary.
Last edited by Enteroctopus at Mar 27, 2015,
#12
Hmm, let me give you some feedback. I own(ed) the VK 112, Vypyr 30 (similar to the 75 in that it's all solid state just 30W instead of 75W), and a Randall RG100EC (Gen 1).

I'm not sure what you want for groove tones but I can speak to thrash.

The VK can just barely get into some classic thrash tones and I felt that it really needed an external tubescreamer pedal to do it. Putting in a dummy jack (1/4" to 1/8" adapter is what I used) in input 1, guitar into input 2 and putting a patch cable in the loop does WONDERS for this amp. Make the shop loan you these pieces when you play it. It sounds good at low volumes too if that's important.

Vypyr - this amp is very versatile and you can get all of those tones out of it. Try the Recto, red channel and 6505 green channel with screamer param 1 0, param 2 10. I feel that these modeling amps do a great job at getting you a huge variety of sounds but a poor job in tuning in a particular sound. For instance the presence and resonance are set on the Vypyr 6505 and can't be changed. You may want to read the manual before you demo this one - it's easy once you know what you're doing but a pain in the beginning.

Randall RG100SC - Is that G3 one with all of the affects? If so, don't buy it. Get the Vypyr instead. If it doesn't have those affects then try it out. I didn't really care for my RG100SC and have been trying to move it for quite a while. That's a polite way of saying you're going to be stuck with it or get complete crap for a "trade-in". Though with a 5150 and a Mesa Roadster around I may try running the pre-amp into one of the others and see how it sounds but I really should sell it. . .

Hope that helps!
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#13
If you mean the newer Valveking, I'd definitely take that outta your list. Put a good od or distortion pedal in front for more gain.
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#14
Quote by lucky1978
If you mean the newer Valveking, I'd definitely take that outta your list. Put a good od or distortion pedal in front for more gain.
Are the newer models less prone to muddiness? I know they still have the same craggy stock speaker.
#15
Quote by Will Lane
Are the newer models less prone to muddiness? I know they still have the same craggy stock speaker.


speaker is the main culprit in muddiness. you defintiely need an overdrive for anything approaching thrash tones. i've prety much found that if the gain is over 5 that you end up with a muddy sound as well. i keep mine in the 3-4 range and then use an overdrive for any of the higher gain tones i use. once the speaker gets broken in it does sound a little better. the VK despite what peavey advertising would have you believe really isn't a metal amp once you get past 70s-early 80s type tones.