#1
Hi, Member

As a beginner/ amateur, I have serious question on which arpeggios that I MUST learn.
I'm tired of learning new chord and playing annoying song with just some chord and pre-made solo, and it time for me to take to the new level of guitar world.

Please guide me the way it mean to be a player not to impress anyone but myself.
#3
Don't bump your thread (especially if it's less than half an hour old).

You don't have to learn any arpeggios. What you "must" learn depends on what you want to learn.

But to learn to play the guitar properly, at least learn the basic chords. All songs use chords. Even if they are more exotic chords, you can always simplify the progression to basic triads.

If you are tired of learning annoying songs, learn songs that you like. But to me it just seems like you have no patience. The basics aren't the most fun thing, but you need to learn them first. Learn to play the open chords. Learn to play barre chords. If you learn to play them, you can already play a lot. And it doesn't even take a lot of time.

You may want to figure out your goals. What do you want to achieve as a guitar player? Do you want to be a professional musician? Do you want to play in a band? Do you want to play original songs? Is there a specific song you can't wait to learn to play? What kind of music do you want to play? Do you want to learn to improvise? Etc. Think about these questions. Then think about what you need to do to achieve your goals. Maybe that will motivate you to learn some more boring stuff.

You can't just start playing like Steve Vai straight away. Steve Vai got to the level he is at right now with a lot of hard work. He needed to start with the "boring" things, just like everybody else (and they don't have to be boring - you are the one who decides what's boring, and you can also find ways to make it more interesting). Steve Vai (just like every guitarist in the world) sucked at first, but after practicing a lot, he became what he is right now.

Maybe you start taking guitar lessons. It seems like you have no idea of what to do and a teacher may help.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Mar 27, 2015,
#4
Yes, It's true that I teach myself on how to play a guitar, but I come to the end that I dont know what to learn next that why I ask for arpeggio. I now can switch from bare chord to normal chord at normal speed and learning new chord isn't that hard.

The thing I want to know is what should I learn next. I can't take guitar class as I have no time beside learning myself I just can't. I can play my favorite song also but I need to learn something new to improve the technique of playing guitar.

Why I'm asking for arpeggio? and the answer is I need something new and I do really solo that why I pick Electric guitar instead of Acoustic.
#5
Arpeggio's :

1) major
2) minor
3) 7th
4) major 7
5) minor 7

Start with those. That's a bout 90% of anything you'll need right there.
#6
Quote by sosxradar
I come to the end that I dont know what to learn next


This, is why teachers are good. All the information is free on the internet. What is important and in what order you want to learn it, is not. And it depends largely on you, your skill level, your aptitude, and where you want to go with guitar.

But you need a good teacher. Not all teachers will be good. Just like you will get a number of different opinions in a forum. Who you should listen to, is not evident.

Quote by sosxradar
Why I'm asking for arpeggio? and the answer is I need something new and I do really solo that why I pick Electric guitar instead of Acoustic.


Lol, the ability to solo doesn't come from the instrument. I could solo circles around most electric guitarists, and I play acoustic exclusively.

So does this guy;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-ztuvMsy-c
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Mar 27, 2015,
#8
if you have to ask what arpeggios, you probably lack the theoretical awareness to be able to use them in solos properly - you'd just be learning fretboard shapes, in which case it'd be more rewarding to just learn more songs.

do you know basic diatonic theory?
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#9
Learn basic music theory. Topics including intervals, scales, constructing triad (three-note) chords from said scales, etc. There is a lot of information online. Start with those topics.
#10
^^These last two hit the nail on the head.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#11
Quote by vIsIbleNoIsE
if you have to ask what arpeggios, you probably lack the theoretical awareness to be able to use them in solos properly - you'd just be learning fretboard shapes, in which case it'd be more rewarding to just learn more songs.

do you know basic diatonic theory?


Yeah, this. If you say you know chords but are asking what arpeggios to learn first then that tells me that you don't really understand why it has an obvious answer that would preclude it from being asked.

Specifically...

You: "What arpeggios should I learn?"

Me: "What chords do you know?"
#12
Yeah, if you want to learn arpeggios, learn them in context. You do nothing with shapes. You need to know how to use them. So learn songs. That's what you should do. Knowing arpeggios and all is useful. But it's only useful if you can use them musically. You know enough to play some music, so start playing music.

Don't learn theory first, technique second and music third. That's the wrong order. Learn to play music first. Theory and technique means nothing if you don't actually understand music or can't use any of the concepts musically.

It really does seem like you need a teacher.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#13
Arpeggio = chord = arpeggio. It's just that in an arpeggio the notes of a chord are played individually. Some metal guys think arpeggios are some unique sweep picking thing that have to be played up the neck and sweep picked 64th notes 9000bpm. Because YNGWIE MALMSTEEN arpeggios from hell!!!1

So if you're learning arpeggios it means you're just learning simply chords and vice versa.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Mar 27, 2015,
#14
Then can you all be my teacher? I have motivation in learning to play guitar. From nothing to set up a guitar, remove neck, learn technique, learn chord, learn to play along with other and leanr alternate piicking..... What should I do. As I say I can't take a class as I have no time because I'm grade 12.
#15
Quote by sosxradar
Then can you all be my teacher? I have motivation in learning to play guitar. From nothing to set up a guitar, remove neck, learn technique, learn chord, learn to play along with other and leanr alternate piicking..... What should I do. As I say I can't take a class as I have no time because I'm grade 12.


Learning guitar takes time. I mean you can learn it real slow and not get too far very fast, but it takes time. It's just that way. I could play 4 instruments when I was in grade 12, plus a couple music creation programs. It's about priorities. You have to choose how to spend your time. If it's not guitar, then learning guitar will be tough. Life is that way. That's why great guitarists are special. Partly because they are especially talented, but also they are people that devoted their time to guitar. If you want to learn it on the side, that's great, but don't hold inflated expectations of what you will be able to accomplish.

A teacher can still help you, and it will be faster. A lesson would take like an hour, an hour and a half once a week (including travel etc...). Or do one once every two weeks. It's the practice that really takes the time.

What you want, is one on one time, so the teacher can learn about you, and be specific for what would be good for you.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Mar 28, 2015,
#16
We can't really be your teachers because we don't know you. The point of a teacher is know you - to know your goals, to know what you are good at and to know your weaknesses. Why a teacher is also important is because they can instantly tell if you are playing something right or wrong.

This won't work as a guitar teaching forum. It's just not going to happen.

What should you do? What do you want to do - that's the question you should ask yourself. If you want to learn to play arpeggios, learn to play arpeggios. But learn them in context. Learn other people's songs.

The internet is full of free lessons. If you get interested in alternate picking, read some articles and watch some videos about it. Listen to songs that use the technique and learn to play them. But IMO you should learn a technique when you need it - music first, then technique and not the other way around. So just listen to songs, learn to play them. If some parts are causing trouble, play some technical exercises. For example if the solo you want to learn uses sweep picking and you can't do it, start practicing sweep picking. I think it's good to know why you practice certain things.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#18
Quote by Elintasokas
Google is your friend. That's how I learned all my theory. Never had a teacher.


Ya, me too. But if I could warp back in time and teach myself, I'd be really down with that.
#19
Learn Eugene's Trick Bag from Crossroads lol.

It's loosely based on the 5th caprice, and was helpful to me. Not so much for learning "about" arpeggios, but learning how they are played all over the neck, and what to expect from future arpeggios you will learn.

Or be a bad enough dude and learn the theory first.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8eymimAV8k
#20
hey man, like stated before google is your best friend when it comes to learning new things. I'd suggest learning songs you enjoy by tabs etc. As long as you're not completely tone deaf and can tell if you're playing out of key then just practice solos over backing tracks. This way you get a feeling of what making music is about. Don't worry about shredding or anything at the moment. After that, then start to understand basi music theory. I'll give you a tip maybe it'll help? if you're playing a C maj chord you're playing c,e,g all at once to create that chord. Where did those notes come from? obviously the C maj scale. CDEFGABC. as you can see you took the 1st 3rd and 5th note and strum them all at once to make the chord. You can do that with D,F,A which is D minor chord, or EGB which is a E minor and so on and so on.. Anyways back to the arpeggio thing. Take the first example which is a C maj chord, play the 3 notes conservatively, not all at once and you're playing a C maj Arpeggio C E G. Hope this helps, and all this is on the web somewhere man, you just have to try to find it!
#21
A thing I was confused about til recently, which is apparently very common, you don't just hold a chord and playeach note one by one. TThat's called arpeggiating and it's a slightly different technique from doing arpeggios. Correctly doing arpeggios is to play it like a melody, using only your fingertips, one note at a time, with a metronome. Like scales, learn multiple positions so that you can move around and make musically interesting melodies.

This guy Justin has helped me make sense of this, http://www.justinguitar.com/en/AR-000-Arpeggios.php watch ARP 101 video, he'll explain it better
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#22
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Don't bump your thread (especially if it's less than half an hour old).


He didn't bump his thread, he bumbed it.