#1
Ok so I want to upgrade my guitar's volume and tone pots . And I want to wire it like this :
http://www.guitarelectronics.com/product/WDUHHH3T2201/WDU-HHH3T22-01.html

But being 100% with you guys, I don't know much about how wiring works and I'm having trouble understanding how to wire up the ground. I think I understand how to ground the pots, and how to ground the humbucker pick up wires . but I don't understand where the ground from the bridge goes . I also don't understand how to ground the pot with the capacitor in the diagram .

Please ! take a look at the diagram guys . It seems confusing to me . Feel free To make fun of me , I just don't fully understand it . And I rather be safe than sorry . Keep in mind this is a 3 humbucker guitar not 3 single coils .
#2
Fact that it's three humbuckers makes zero difference in this context.

Pots are grounded by:
bending the correct tab (lug) to touch the back housing of the pot, connecting it with solder,
connecting the back/tab (connected now so whatever is easiest for you) to the star ground (usually just the back of the bridge volume pot)
connecting the star ground to the ground coming off the bridge.
The tone pot (one with capacitor) is done exactly the same except instead of grounding that lug of the pot you use the capacitor (i.e., lug to capacitor to back of pot, then wire from back of pot to ground)

The pickup ground wires are usually soldered straight to the back of their volume pot. Remember that grounds (for our purposes here) are all the same, so as long as your ground wires are properly connected it doesn't matter where they connect, just that they do.


My advice, give it a shot and if it doesn't work describe what's going wrong and post detailed pictures here. You'll figure a lot out once you've got it all in front of you and as long as you don't sit there frying the pots with your soldering iron you can't mess anything up by trying.
#3
Ok thanks . I think for the most part I understand what you said .

I just wanted to be sure I had a good understanding of it before I start , I don't even have my new electronics yet , I'll have them delivered to me Monday . And I want to be sure I don't muck anything up , I know how to solder , my biggest problem has just been understanding how the wiring works . I'll continue studying and trying to better understand it until my stuff arrives .
#4
What part don't you understand? For the most part, you can ignore the grounds when looking at a diagram. Just assume they all end up the same place, so focus on where the hot signal travels from the pickup.

At the switch the connection is either broken or allowed to flow through, simple enough. At a volume pot it is allowed to flow through but part of it is shunted to ground through the pot. A tone pot is the same thing but the capacitor lets only the treble go to ground. (It's an RC filter; the cap and volume pot values determine the frequency of the circuit which corresponds to the Hz center of treble removed)

If it helps, think about pots in this context as having an in, an out, and a ground lug. The "in" goes to the "out" but some of it (based on where the knob is set) goes to ground and is therefore removed from the signal. The pot just tells how much of the "in" goes to the "out" lug and how much goes to the "ground" tab.
#5
The moderator did a good job explaining this. But just in case here's some of my suggestions and all.

so string ground can be done anywhere. It prevents the strings from buzzing. Grounding pots does the same thing.

With a wiring like this my advice is to
*pretend you're wiring three independent volumes.
*seymour duncan illustrated how to ground a les paul very effectively. Regardless of the wiring of les pauls it doesnt change. 2V from 3V

so ground is ground the backs of every pot is ground in this schematic
the right contact on a volume represents 0 , your left contact represents 100%. The middle contact is the controlled % of the potentiometer

so.. "grounding" the volume pot with the right contact you have volume control. Without it if you turn the knob down it stays at the full power as the signal has nowhere to escape outside the amplifier.

when the tone knob leaves a capacitor getting super technical what I took from it is that the capacitor holds onto a charge giving the illusion that the guitars treble is taken away. That being said you're filtering it out from the main hot lead from the selector before it finally makes its way to the input jack.

This is a great example of how the pots ground on a les paul style guitar 2 volume or three. Seymour Duncan doesn't have that diagram you're after and it's a little late for me to break out photoshop but this is two steps in the right direction.

so firstly the "grounding" , pretend you're adding 3 volumes. I'd put the 3rd volume for the middle pickups wiper (middle contact from the 3rd pickups volume) to the hot lead common on the selector (between the two pickup selections or straight to the input jacks tip section) it's up to you.


next how to use the tone with this wiring


good luck
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Mar 27, 2015,
#7
My stuff finally came . It was delayed I don't know why. This is what I've done so far . I bent the pot lugs like on the diagram and soldered them to the back . And I've soldered the wires to the 3 way switch , also the capacitor . I hope I'm doing this right . I guess the next step would be to ground the 3 wires together ? With the buss wire ?
#9
Looks nice so far! That's clean work. Usually this stuff is done inside the guitar, the pots are easier to wire outside but the switch might give you trouble depending on where it is. You may have to desolder and install it to be able to route the wires properly.

Next steps I'd suggest:
Do the pot-to-pot connections & grounding
Put the pots and switch in the guitar
Install the pickups in the guitar, if you haven't already
Get the pickup to switch/pot connections in
Do the bridge ground and output jack connections
Plug into an amp and check all the wiring (listen for noise, tap the pole pieces with a screwdriver to see if they're making sound when they should and are quiet when they should not)
String up and play! (adjust pickup height as needed)
#10
What I'm having a bit of trouble with is applying solder to the ground lug in the 3 way switch . I guess it's because my solderin iron isn't hot enough . It seems to heat up te switch a lot and the solder still won't flow on it ... I'll try once more after my iron gets hotter
#11
my first guess would be the type of solder. I've had the best luck with 60/40 rosin core with lead. The lead free kind I'm not a fan of as it makes the job harder. With that kind of 60/40 I've soldered practically every kind of switch on the market without any issues.

some tips. clean and tin the irons tip and make sure the contact is clean.
Feed the solder directly to the contact where the stick of solder is almost touching the contact.
#12
Got a new iron . It helped a lot . The one I started with had a broken tip anyway. Thank you guys .. I learned a lot from soldering this time around . I made a few mistakes too .. But hopefully next time is a lot better . My guitar is working and and the volume / tone knobs all work . Thanks ..