#1
I'm looking for some digital aid for making covers. It could be a plugin for a software such as Pro-Tools or some stand-alone software.

First let's say I'm doing a cover of a song or a track called "A" with some sought after guitar tone, for instance Eric Claptons Beano tone. I've recorded a clean version of the track that note for note is the same as the album original track "A" but without any effects, so it sounds plain and boring.

Now I'm looking for a software or plugin that can do one of the following.

1. Use the cover I've recorded to mute out all guitar in the original song. Now I get a perfect backing track with everything exactly the same as the original, great for practice.

2. Use the cover I've recorded to analyze the tone used in the original song. From this the software generates a digital effect that makes my clean track sound like the track in the original song. Tada, the Beano tone without experimenting with 500 digital effects.

All information is appreciated, even if you think that the software you're mentioning is working badly
Last edited by SirSixString at Mar 29, 2015,
#2
umm i don't think things like that exist...i mean come on ! things would have been too easy for everyone if there was a plugin which could give you the exact tone of another song. Technology isn't magic...

if you need backing tracks you could hunt for some at youtube or here , or maybe create one via guitar pro

i don't think any software can remove only the guitar part cleanly...

as for the tone , search google or try to make out yourself how the original tone was created...what effects were used , the order of the effects , which amps were used and so on , and then find out the particular emulator plugins for each part , put them in order and you'd have a pretty close tone

i hope i was of help
#3
Google "Match EQ." You'll be lucky to find a song where you can do this, considering the guitars need to be isolated, but I've seen some engineers pull off some pretty realistic replications using this technique. Other than that, just use your ears, man. Learn to pick out what EQ, effects, combinations with other instruments in the mix, etc., come together to create these tones, and do it yourself.

Or, better yet, develop your own signature sound. That way, you can cover a wide array of songs, albums and artists, and your audience will feel like the production ties them all together.
#4
I think that new Line 6 plastic looking 5 speaker combo thing selects your guitar tone for you depending on the song being played through it. Closest I can think of that saves you messing around for tones. I agree with Kevin. Get your own tone, there's already a Clapton, surely that's already one too many...
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#5
Thankfully nothing like this exists. It's bad enough that performers are using sampled tracks and stealing riffs but does anyone think cloning tones is a good idea. It takes many years of playing and practice to develop a style and sound of your own. There are way to many shortcuts now (Autotune comes to mind) that allow people with little to no talent to load up the internet with unoriginal sounding garbage. If you want to sound like anybody in particular the answer is the same as it always was. Practice, practice, practice.
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#6
Match EQ can copy a dry guitar tone very well, but if it has an major effects on it, it won't work and you'll end up with a phasey, hollow, guitar tone.
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#7
You can find isolated stems for a buttload of classic songs from the "Rockband" and "Guitar Hero" games online..
#8
NRG_sama_: I know about the YouTube backing tracks, unfortuntately they are usually rather mediocre covers

Rickholly74: But a lot of this is not due to skills, but due to having the correct gear. A lot of people spend fortunes on gear to get a specific tone. What if this could be done with some cheap software instead.

KevinGoetz: I don't know if that would work as it seems to copy the whole setting of the track rather than the guitar track(s) isolated. Also it won't get effects such as distorsion, reverb etc. Thanks anyway though, I should check it out.

BMC15: That a nice tip, didn't think of that.

crackerjack123: That's neat, I should check it up.

I'm not asking just because I specfically need these things, but because if nobody else has developed this I would like to try to develop some of this software myself.
#9
To do what you're looking to do would be extremely difficult. The song is already mixed, and separating a single guitar part out to get it's sound is near impossible. That's like trying to extract tomatoes from ketchup.

Rickholly74: But a lot of this is not due to skills, but due to having the correct gear. A lot of people spend fortunes on gear to get a specific tone. What if this could be done with some cheap software instead.


There is plenty of cheap (even free) software that sounds great and can get you pretty darn close to the original tone. Check out the amp simulator sticky to read about them.
#10
All of the above for most of what you're asking. Create your own sound, don't try to be an unimaginative copy of someone else.

However, something occurred to me that hasn't been mentioned yet:
Quote by SirSixString
1. Use the cover I've recorded to mute out all guitar in the original song. Now I get a perfect backing track with everything exactly the same as the original, great for practice.

I'm not an expert here, but if you did somehow create some magic software that removed a single part from an mp3, you would never be able to use it for anything. Copyright rules would come into play, whereby anything you record using the original song as a backing track would be owned by the original artist. Any recording you put out there has to be all your own work, or I believe you'd be breaking the copyright laws.

I'm sure someone more knowledgeable will confirm the details.

I know in your example you talk about removing a track from a cover you recorded, but I suspect the implications of the software you're talking about creating could cause legal issues for anyone who uses it.

But lets face it, if you're talking about simply removing a guitar part from a song you recorded yourself for practice purposes, why wouldn't you just mix a version of it with that part muted?
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#11
Quote by SirSixString
NRG_sama_: I know about the YouTube backing tracks, unfortuntately they are usually rather mediocre covers


Yeah but for some songs you can get really good backing tracks...

and also i've never been disappointed by the backing tracks from the site i mentioned...

you can also try to get in touch with some people who play well and collaborate...that's the best way

And also i don't think you can "subtract" a track from another like that..

EDIT- turns out you can get a pretty workable backing track by creating 4-5 instances of the original track and eq-ing different instances differently...for examples you keep just the bass frequencies on one for kicks,snares and bass , a narrow mid band for the vocals on another , highs on one for the cymbals and so on...you also need to cut out portions from some of the instances ... in short a lot of pain , and the end result won't be really pretty . also you could run into copyright infringement so nope.
Last edited by NRG_sama_ at Mar 31, 2015,
#12
Quote by GaryBillington

I'm not an expert here, but if you did somehow create some magic software that removed a single part from an mp3, you would never be able to use it for anything. Copyright rules would come into play, whereby anything you record using the original song as a backing track would be owned by the original artist. Any recording you put out there has to be all your own work, or I believe you'd be breaking the copyright laws.

I'm sure someone more knowledgeable will confirm the details.

I know in your example you talk about removing a track from a cover you recorded, but I suspect the implications of the software you're talking about creating could cause legal issues for anyone who uses it.

I happen to be an expert on this subject, and I can confirm that you are correct. That would be a violation of the copyright in a MAJOR way, and you would share ownership (if they let it see the light of day) with both the songwriters AND whoever owns the master recording (the label, usually). You'd need permission from both camps, with a large monetary license fee, to be able to use it for anything at all (even give it away for free or stream it on your own website).
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#13
Quote by Sid McCall
I happen to be an expert on this subject, and I can confirm that you are correct. That would be a violation of the copyright in a MAJOR way, and you would share ownership (if they let it see the light of day) with both the songwriters AND whoever owns the master recording (the label, usually). You'd need permission from both camps, with a large monetary license fee, to be able to use it for anything at all (even give it away for free or stream it on your own website).

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#14
Quote by Sid McCall
I happen to be an expert on this subject, and I can confirm that you are correct. That would be a violation of the copyright in a MAJOR way, and you would share ownership (if they let it see the light of day) with both the songwriters AND whoever owns the master recording (the label, usually). You'd need permission from both camps, with a large monetary license fee, to be able to use it for anything at all (even give it away for free or stream it on your own website).
Well, if I would play it on national television there should be problems. But I don't think I'm gonna get dragged away by a special police team for playing it at home by myself... If I play it loud and badly maybe


Quote by NRG_sama_
turns out you can get a pretty workable backing track by creating 4-5 instances of the original track and eq-ing different instances differently...for examples you keep just the bass frequencies on one for kicks,snares and bass , a narrow mid band for the vocals on another , highs on one for the cymbals and so on...you also need to cut out portions from some of the instances ... in short a lot of pain , and the end result won't be really pretty . also you could run into copyright infringement so nope.
But why would that be different from applying a digital EQ on the whole thing from start?

Agreed that is nicer to play with others in general. But off course I don't want to put together a whole band each time I need a backing track

Quote by chaosmoon
To do what you're looking to do would be extremely difficult. The song is already mixed, and separating a single guitar part out to get it's sound is near impossible. That's like trying to extract tomatoes from ketchup.
But it's sure possible. Harmonix already managed to pull it off, listen to this for instance:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQYDUEFcsfk
#15
Quote by SirSixString
But it's sure possible. Harmonix already managed to pull it off, listen to this for instance:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQYDUEFcsfk

True, but keep in mind that is a big company with lots of money. Also, I'm not exactly sure how they did that. They may have access to the multitracks. I'd be interested to know more about how they did all those.

Which also brings up a good point. You can download the multitracks from any song that was on Rock Band or Guitar Hero. They're pretty much all online, and you can separate out the guitars, bass, vocals, etc.
#16
Quote by SirSixString
Well, if I would play it on national television there should be problems. But I don't think I'm gonna get dragged away by a special police team for playing it at home by myself... If I play it loud and badly maybe

Well, just don't put it online anywhere or it will get taken down and/or you'll be fined. For personal practice, go nuts.
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#17
Quote by SirSixString


But why would that be different from applying a digital EQ on the whole thing from start?



I'm not a big expert , i found that it's easier that way...