#1
It's my guitar. I've had it for a while. It never felt bad to play and I never thought to peer at the neck from this angle before. I asked my wife and my brother the same question and they both said no, but they were holding the actual guitar (vs looking at this photo) and they don't play at all.

I've never tuned it to anything but standard and I've kept it strung with 9s. No abusive treatment.


#3
if it plays well and doesn't have any issues fretting out then I wouldn't worry too much
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#4
Yeah you cannot use the open strings as a way to measure the straightness of a neck because the nut slots are set at different heights for each string, creating the illusion of a twist.

I think one good way to measure the amount of twist in a neck is to capo the first fret and the 17th fret (as you were to measure the neck relief) and measure the gap between the 7th fret and the low E string, and compare that distance to doing the same test to the high E string. If the difference is negligible, then the neck is fine.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Mar 29, 2015,
#6
if it plays good it's probably not twisted .... but heres some pictures of a neck that is twisted , it's a bolt on neck and when you lay it flat it teeter tawters side to side



#7
just to add a little more info , my neck above twisted in a 5 minute period ..... went from great to un playable that quick ....... I will never own a birdseye maple neck again , look pretty but not stable
#8
Quote by GraceByDeath
I see a twist but...That guitar is white and gold. Or is it...blue and black?


Okay you got a chuckle. It's red though.

@everyone - thanks for the advice. I think it plays well.
#9
again, like said, all you have to do, is fret the first fret, and the last, and see if the relief at the high e and the low E are the same.

the reason you'll want to know, is that, you'll want to be extra careful when changing strings, and adjusting for relief in the future.

this is a measurement you can compare as the guitar ages. and adjust as needed.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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Last edited by jj1565 at Mar 30, 2015,
#10
I did the string-relief test. Both sides fretted at first and last fret. The low E appears to be .01 and the high E appears to be .01 as well, but it's hard to measure that accurately.

If I had to guess, I'd say that the low E might be a tiny bit higher than .01 and the high E side might be a tiny bit lower than .01.
So maybe .011 vs .009?


I evaluated the storage situation. I have been storing it in a spot where there might be a temperature difference between the sides. The low E side is nearer to the heater vent. The high E side is nearer to the window.

I decided that I'm going to reverse the way I hang the guitar. I'll be hanging the guitar with the front facing toward the wall. If temperature is an issue then it should help to reverse the situation, right?


I also put the photo in an image editor and I used a rotation tool to line the first fret up with the bottom of the screen. That showed that the nut is clearly a little bit taller on the low E side. So that's probably responsible for a part of what we saw.
#11
If the difference can't be measured, and you can get the action even and satisfactory without buzz along the entire board, there's no real reason to suspect a neck twist. You'll hear and feel the difference well before you see it.

As you noted, between the neck, frets, and bridge, it's very difficult to evaluate the neck alone. Neck twists are exceptionally rare in production guitars, and one of the few things I'd expect to actually be covered by the warranty. Usually anything that goes wrong with a guitar falls into wear and tear, accidents/abuse, or purely cosmetic, but a twisted neck should be covered as a failure in materials. Of course, everyone voids their warranty one way or the other, but if by some miracle yours is still valid it might be a good excuse to get a free evaluation by a PRS tech, or at least another reason not to worry about it.
#12
Quote by Roc8995
If the difference can't be measured, and you can get the action even and satisfactory without buzz along the entire board, there's no real reason to suspect a neck twist. You'll hear and feel the difference well before you see it.

As you noted, between the neck, frets, and bridge, it's very difficult to evaluate the neck alone. Neck twists are exceptionally rare in production guitars, and one of the few things I'd expect to actually be covered by the warranty. Usually anything that goes wrong with a guitar falls into wear and tear, accidents/abuse, or purely cosmetic, but a twisted neck should be covered as a failure in materials. Of course, everyone voids their warranty one way or the other, but if by some miracle yours is still valid it might be a good excuse to get a free evaluation by a PRS tech, or at least another reason not to worry about it.

+1
says the man in baby blue
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#13
Quote by paul.housley.7
I did the string-relief test. Both sides fretted at first and last fret. The low E appears to be .01 and the high E appears to be .01 as well, but it's hard to measure that accurately.

If I had to guess, I'd say that the low E might be a tiny bit higher than .01 and the high E side might be a tiny bit lower than .01.
So maybe .011 vs .009?


I evaluated the storage situation. I have been storing it in a spot where there might be a temperature difference between the sides. The low E side is nearer to the heater vent. The high E side is nearer to the window.

I decided that I'm going to reverse the way I hang the guitar. I'll be hanging the guitar with the front facing toward the wall. If temperature is an issue then it should help to reverse the situation, right?


I also put the photo in an image editor and I used a rotation tool to line the first fret up with the bottom of the screen. That showed that the nut is clearly a little bit taller on the low E side. So that's probably responsible for a part of what we saw.


Unless your house is built against code it sounds like you're hanging your guitar on an outside wall!

Never do this, move the hanger to an inside wall.
Moving on.....
#14
Quote by Fumble fingers
just to add a little more info , my neck above twisted in a 5 minute period ..... went from great to un playable that quick ....... I will never own a birdseye maple neck again , look pretty but not stable


How did it happen so fast? I'm guessing its one piece?
#15
was sounding good then started buzzing a little then got un playable bad real quick bad , got my wrench to adjust neck and a 1/4 turn made the strings just flop flat on the fret board ..... I was scratching my head for a few minutes then figured out my neck was like a noodle , just the smallest adjustment made the neck total change shape and never could get the back bow straight , took it off and it wouldn't lay flat on the table , rocked side to side .... then I saw the twist , broke my heart too , it went so quick with no warning