#1
Hi, I'm thinking about ordering my first 7 string guitar. It's gonna be a Carvin. But I've heard that only a fanned fret guitar sounds correct with 7 or more strings.

I am not changing the standard tuning B E A D G B E. Should I be concerned about the low B string in this case, on a regular scale guitar? Or is it just a hype with these fanned fret guitars?
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#2
What do you mean by "sounds correct"? 7 strings don't have any problems with intonation with regular frets.
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#3
Quote by gorkyporky
What do you mean by "sounds correct"? 7 strings don't have any problems with intonation with regular frets.

Well, some say that the low B sounds kinda muddy/unclear compared to the other strings, but I don't know that could be in the case of tuning down and obviously lower tension.
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#4
The point of having fanned frets on a guitar is by extending the scale length of the lower strings compared to the higher strings, you lessen the effect of the guitar sounding duller and duller on the lower strings at the higher frets, by elongating their scale length without making the scale length of the higher strings too long that playing leads requires uncomfortably long finger stretches. This effect becomes more apparent on heavier gauged strings, which is typical of guitars that are tuned very low. So it makes sense that they're becoming more popular on 7 and 8 strings.

There's no reason fanned frets shouldn't work on 6 strings. They're just not as common.

Having fanned frets has nothing to do with intonation. It has everything to do with improving the definition of the lower strings with their heavier gauges.
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#5
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
The point of having fanned frets on a guitar is by extending the scale length of the lower strings compared to the higher strings, you lessen the effect of the guitar sounding duller and duller on the lower strings at the higher frets, by elongating their scale length without making the scale length of the higher strings too long that playing leads requires uncomfortably long finger stretches. This effect becomes more apparent on heavier gauged strings, which is typical of guitars that are tuned very low. So it makes sense that they're becoming more popular on 7 and 8 strings.

There's no reason fanned frets shouldn't work on 6 strings. They're just not as common.

Having fanned frets has nothing to do with intonation. It has everything to do with improving the definition of the lower strings with their heavier gauges.


I see, so in your opinion, would I have any problem with a 25.5" scale 7 string guitar tuned B E A D G B E with regular 10-56 strings? I mean, you know the tone of the low B being "muffled" or something?
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#6
Quote by Icy_Lights
I see, so in your opinion, would I have any problem with a 25.5" scale 7 string guitar tuned B E A D G B E with regular 10-56 strings? I mean, you know the tone of the low B being "muffled" or something?

I personally don't have much of a problem in that situation. Although a 56 is too light.

Really it depends on if you find that acceptable. You'll never really know until you try.

I hate to sound like a bit of a fence sitter when people want a yes or no answer, but that's the bottom line. Some people are okay with it, some aren't.
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#7
Quote by Icy_Lights
I see, so in your opinion, would I have any problem with a 25.5" scale 7 string guitar tuned B E A D G B E with regular 10-56 strings? I mean, you know the tone of the low B being "muffled" or something?


For a 25.5" 7 string in standard I use a 10-52 set with a .70 on the low B so the tension is pretty even across the wound strings. Just a personal preference. But with say a 59 on the low B I find it to be a bit flubby.

Like the others said, a multiscale guitar is more about keeping the low strings tight, articulate and not all muddy while not making the high strings shrill and potentially too flat and "cold" (as opposed to a warmer sort of tone). In theory you could just keep raising the string gauge on the low end but there gets a point where you lose definition fretting and it just becomes more economical, logical and ergonomic to lengthen the scale.
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#8
I use a fanned fret 6 and the biggest difference is it feels better then straight frets. Be careful about getting them it can be a very expensive addiction to have.
#9
Quote by mhanbury2
I use a fanned fret 6 and the biggest difference is it feels better then straight frets. Be careful about getting them it can be a very expensive addiction to have.


Not these days.

RondoMusic (dot com) has been putting their Pendulum and PendulumPro series out with multiscale guitars of 7, 8, 9 and even 10-strings running $600 to around $1300 (with a Kahler trem!). While these used to be the province of custom builders only, Rondo has brought these into a range where "normal" folks can afford them, and their success with them has begun to spur some of the larger companies (Schecter) into considering production runs as well.
#10
Yes, agile is an option but shipping outside of the us even just to Canada is about $300. They also don't do 6 strings as far as I know. But it is good that they are helping get more people into it, I really hope fanned frets become something you see in most guitar stores one day.
#11
Quote by mhanbury2
Yes, agile is an option but shipping outside of the us even just to Canada is about $300.


Wow. I just had a guitar shipped to me from Vancouver for $30.
#12
It had been about a year since I looked at agile prices. $259 shipping on a $700 guitar that's a big hidden fee on a guitar that price.
#13
So, going back to the topic, what strings would you recommend? 10-56 is too light... hmm. I use Dunlop strings on my 6 string guitar. And they have this 10-56 set.
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#14
You're not going to have any issues with a 7 string that's not multiscale. Countless thousands of players are doing just fine.

I'd suggest like a 10-52 6 string set, plus a 60 at least on the bottom. Just depends how tight you want that low B. It seems to me that most 7 string players (at least the ones playing metal) like a good amount of tension on it. Gotta be tight for those fast palm muted chugs to not get muddy. Like stig said up there, he uses a 70 for the low B. When you get your guitar, get a 10-52 6 string set and couple different gauge low strings to try out. Should be able to get single strings.
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#15
Quote by the_bi99man
You're not going to have any issues with a 7 string that's not multiscale. Countless thousands of players are doing just fine.

I'd suggest like a 10-52 6 string set, plus a 60 at least on the bottom. Just depends how tight you want that low B. It seems to me that most 7 string players (at least the ones playing metal) like a good amount of tension on it. Gotta be tight for those fast palm muted chugs to not get muddy. Like stig said up there, he uses a 70 for the low B. When you get your guitar, get a 10-52 6 string set and couple different gauge low strings to try out. Should be able to get single strings.


Yeah. Went to the D'Addario website on their string tension calculator, put the balanced tension 6 strings set EXL 110BT, added a 60 B string and now I've got a perfectly tension balanced 7 string set. How much simple can it get? Probably if D'Addario will start offering it, haha.

Thanks
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#16
it will only sound muddy if it's a 25/25.5in and with like a sub 60 on the low b. I had one of those cheap ibanez 7s that were 25.5 and even with a 72 or 4 on it I couldn't tune it to G without it being too muddy(my cheap 10in speaker amp didn't help any also).
#17
Quote by TheStig1214
For a 25.5" 7 string in standard I use a 10-52 set with a .70 on the low B so the tension is pretty even across the wound strings. Just a personal preference. But with say a 59 on the low B I find it to be a bit flubby.

wat, I occasionally tried tuning up my .064 to B and it felt like near breaking point, how tight is .070 in B?

But then, yeah, it's all a matter of preference, but a regular 7-string absolutely won't sound bad in any way. You might want a more customised guitar if you want to tune really low or something, but in B standard or a little below it will be perfectly fine even on a completely normal guitar. Even bands like Periphery who seem really picky about their gear use all guitars with regular frets even for the lowest tunings.

Also wanted to add the opposite voice on the "how thick strings" debate - I went the exactly opposite path, I started with thicker strings, thinking it's going to sound all fat, massive, heavy and awesome, while I actually found out that more moderate tension sounds more aggressive and growly. I have a 26,5" scale Schecter 7-string, I went from 9-46 sets with a 64 for drop A to 9-42 with a 62 and actually I like the sound of the latter far more for metal playing. The attack is much more aggressive and especially palm mutes have a much more "chuggy" sound, while they're quite dull with very tense strings. Very tight strings tend to sound super bright. Of course, too low tension is generally a bad idea (probable tuning and intonation issues, thin sound etc.), but I recommend also trying a more moderate approach, as more tension is not necessarily "better heavy sound".

tl;dr: repeated for the nth time, it's all a matter of preference
#18
Quote by TheLiberation
wat, I occasionally tried tuning up my .064 to B and it felt like near breaking point, how tight is .070 in B?



About the same tension as a .52 in E.... but again I have a shorter scale for a 7 string.

EDIT: I actually used to use like a 10-52 with a 64 and I found it too loose again, so I ditched the 10 and made it a 13-64 set and use it on a 25.5" scale Ibby in C standard
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Last edited by TheStig1214 at Apr 1, 2015,
#19
oh well, I guess it's really a matter of taste. I find 46 in E to sound already a bit too tight and tense, so 52 is probably way too much. I really like the aggressive attack you get from slightly thinner strings.
#20
For those of you who wanna try something really nice, I recommend the balanced tension sets from daddario. Their gauges are calculated in such way that you have approximately the same tensions. Once I tried them, never gonna go back to regular strings again. And if you get a 60 or a 62 for the low B string in addition to the EXL 110BT, you've got a 7 string balanced set. Totally awesome.
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