#1
Hi

I've played an acoustic 6 string guitar for about 7 years, now I'm thinking about buying a 12 string acoustic guitar. I was just wondering if it's easy to play songs by artists like Taylor Swift, John Mayer and Ed sheeran?
I mostly play along to their music and don't want to buy a 12 string guitar and then realise I can't play along with these songs without making it sound weird lol. Also, is a 12 string guitar really worth the money?
#2
Well, first, you should probably ask in the acoustic guitar section:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=27

Second, how easy it is depends on your skill level.

Third, only you can say if it is worth it to you. I've been debating this for years now, and haven't pulled the trigger. And I really like the sound of a 12.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#3
I love 12's. My first electric was an ES-335-12-string (still have it).

But here's what you need to know about a 12-string acoustic.


One, most cheap 12's don't have great string spacing, so it's easy to accidentally mute a neighboring string.
Two, most cheap 12's don't have great action, so it's more difficult to play than a similar six.
Three, you have at least half-again as much tension on the neck, which means that you're more likely to have bowing necks or bridges that pull up, etc.
Four, it's much more difficult to sell a 12-string on than it is a six (far less demand).
Five, you'll be spending lots more time with a tuner (most acoustic 12's are less than perfectly intonatable).
Six, you have twice as many strings to change (and buy).
Seven, you might consider buying something like one of the nine-string guitars like the ones that Taylor makes, to get the flavor of a 12 with a bit more definition and playability. http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/XXXV9String

These days I have no acoustic 12-strings, two electric 12-strings, and four Variax guitars that have 12-string models (including acoustic models).
#4
Not that I'm an expert, but I'd been told a number of years back to tune an acoustic 12 to D standard and put a capo at the 2nd fret to keep the tension down. I don't really care for capos so I never did this and then I got rid of the acoustic 12 I had. Last year I bought an electric 12, not for necessity but just to play around with down the road.
#5
Quote by Hydra26
Not that I'm an expert, but I'd been told a number of years back to tune an acoustic 12 to D standard and put a capo at the 2nd fret to keep the tension down. I don't really care for capos so I never did this and then I got rid of the acoustic 12 I had. Last year I bought an electric 12, not for necessity but just to play around with down the road.


I'm not sure that has ever made sense to me. If you can build a guitar capable of handling the tensions of D, why not make it handle E in the first place. Not only that, but why bother with 14 frets clear of the guitar if you're going to force a user to eliminate two of them?

I think that probably came from someone who had an old Martin (no truss rod) neck bow on him.