#1
Hey I'm just deciding between the two in a pickup swap in a BC Rich Mockingbird with a floyd, mahogany body, quilt top, and neck through with an ebony fingerboard. It runs through a bad horsie 2, phase 90, noise suppressor, and into a carvin legacy 3 and old line 6 4x12 (very heavy, but I still think it's plywood, I heard speakers are kinda like v30s, and I can tell as they have punchy mids and a thick low end, but I will replace them with the eminence greenback copies). I currently have gibson classic 57s, and they are a little too low output for me.
I am kinda iffy about switching from alnico to ceramic though, and the JB has an a5, so I just wanna see what you guys think would be different about them (tone wise). What do you think?
#2
I've used both extensively. My votes the JB but before dropping some money here's some stuff to think about. Maybe there's some good deals on classified sites but yeah for the most part if you're just picking between two.

*the dimarzio evolution bridge pickup is too balanced for my taste
*the Seymour Duncan JB is more on the trebly side and I'd like to imagine it's hotter and I find it to be more aggressive sounding.

consult the tone charts on both websites and let it help you determine what the guitar is missing as a bridge pickup. It's pretty win win situation because both you're considering have 4 wire variants. If you love the acoustic tone of the guitar perhaps the evolution but I like the JB way more for my styles.

dont' forget to try new or different string and pick materials to really fine tune your sound. The good news is the 57 classics got a high re-sale value.

some suggestions
the seymour duncan distortion , full shred , custom (or custom 5). It may be too medium output but the screaming demon is another PAF inspired on steroids like the custom.

Dimarzio X2N , D-Activator (regular not X) , tone zone or super distortion

at the end of the day it's the tone you're going for so cool names aside it can be whatever you want it to be.
#3
Dude thanks man! I was looking at the custom custom a while. I'll look at that vs the jb.
#4
What music do you play?

I don't have too much experience with different pickups (i.e. never had DiMarzio's), but the JB gets my thumbs up. It's a great, extremely versatile pickup.
#5
I agree. I can vouch for the JBs. Great pups. The sound hot and are very versatile in the cleans and higher gain range.
#6
I can't tell you a lot about the JBs, but I can only agree on what Tallwood13 said about concidering what your guitar is missing tone-wise. I have Evos (HSH) in my Ibanez S570, which is a mahogany-body with quilted maple top, 3-piece maple-neck, bound rosewood fingerboard and a ZR-tremolo. With the stock infinity-pus I found the guitar sounded a bit too muddy on the lows and too trebbly on the highs. What it was basically missing was some punch. I really felt like some extra mids could improve the overall sound, so I got the Evos, which are kick-ass in this guitar. It now delivers the punch I wanted but still has enough lows and highs.

But what works fine on my guitar doesn't necessarily have to work fine for yours. As I said, sit down with your guitar, play and listen carefully what you miss in the tone. If you're not sure, then try finding some videos on youtube with similar guitars and different pickups just for orientation.

Here are two that helped me choose:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNk1rluDfr0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUTIsPO0_VM
Ibanez S570DXQM-BBB
DiMarzio Evolution HSH
Ibanez RG927WBBZ-TGF
DiMarzio Evolution 7 & DiMarzio LiquiFire 7
Peavey Valve King 112, Peavey Vypyr 15
Harley Benton NG-100, Ibanez Weeping Demon

Quote by metalmingee
In fact, wanting different tunings is one of the best reasons to convince others that you need more guitars.
#7
Thanks guys! I'll consider an Evo for a hot-rod guitar, but JB for this one. I play heavy metal instrumentals mostly so my tone is like vai, satch, yngwie, maybe a little like herman li too. I pull the volume knob down to 2 and hit the strings hard for an Iommi-like rhythm tone.
#8
What I love about the JB is that it's great for classic rock and other vintage stuff while it can be pretty brutal and works very well for thrash metal too, it sure is edgy. Scott Ian of Anthrax uses it afaik, and most Jackson Pro guitars, classic shredding machines, are equipped with them.
#9
Quote by Knarrenheino
What I love about the JB is that it's great for classic rock and other vintage stuff while it can be pretty brutal and works very well for thrash metal too, it sure is edgy. Scott Ian of Anthrax uses it afaik, and most Jackson Pro guitars, classic shredding machines, are equipped with them.


+1
The JB excels at articulation but it's a but over the top for my 335.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#10
I've always wondered how high-output pickups are in a semi-hollowbody guitar. What kind of sounds do you get?
#11
Quote by VanhalenVai
I've always wondered how high-output pickups are in a semi-hollowbody guitar. What kind of sounds do you get?


If I were playing Rush I might like it more but I prefer a more vintage sound so the JB will probably come out and a 59 back in. The Duncan Jazz in the neck position is also high output and sounds great.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#12
Quote by VanhalenVai
Thanks guys! I'll consider an Evo for a hot-rod guitar, but JB for this one. I play heavy metal instrumentals mostly so my tone is like vai, satch, yngwie, maybe a little like herman li too. I pull the volume knob down to 2 and hit the strings hard for an Iommi-like rhythm tone.


+1 for Li and Vai . When playing some Black Sabbath I usually use the split neck + middle singlecoill position with about 30 % volume. Sounds really cool with the evos. I can tell you: They have a lot of mids, so they can cut virtually through everything. I find them pretty cool for the modern kinds of metal. Though it's really hard to tell how they'd sound in a BC Rich because both Li and Vai play Ibanez. Generally Ibanez seems to have an affinity for DiMarzios.
Ibanez S570DXQM-BBB
DiMarzio Evolution HSH
Ibanez RG927WBBZ-TGF
DiMarzio Evolution 7 & DiMarzio LiquiFire 7
Peavey Valve King 112, Peavey Vypyr 15
Harley Benton NG-100, Ibanez Weeping Demon

Quote by metalmingee
In fact, wanting different tunings is one of the best reasons to convince others that you need more guitars.
#13
Quote by Cajundaddy
+1
The JB excels at articulation but it's a but over the top for my 335.


Yes, if I was using a semi-acoustic, I'm not sure I'd use a JB, it may be a bit too harsh for that. My main point is that it can be more brutal than the "classic" metal pickup EMG-81, while it still can do clean and crunch really sweet and well.