#2
Technique/Style/Intensity I'd go with Steve Harris of the mighty Maiden.
Groove I'd go with The Legendary Larry Graham
Stage Presence and overall epicness - John 'The Ox' Entwisle for just standing there being epic.
No
#3
Geddy.
Gear:
EBMM Bongo HS 4
EBMM Sting Ray 5
Eden D410T
Tech 21 Sansamp RBI
Tech 21 Sansamp RPM
Art 341 Dual Channel EQ
QSC GX5 Power Amp
#5
Chris Squire defined what it means to be a Prog Rock bassist, but Geddy Lee took it and ran with it for forty years and counting, so I have to go with him.

John Myung almost single-handedly brought the six-string bass out of its Jazz confines, so he must also get a nod.

Doug Johns has more technique - and more impressive technique - than any other bassist of whom I am aware.

There are just too many greats out there.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#6
I going to have to say Geddy Lee is way up there, even if he's not one of my favourites.
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#7
My Must Listen To List:

Stanley Clarke, Bobby Vega, Tal Wilkenfeld, John Entwhistle, Flea, Cliff Burton, Victor Wooten, Jaco Pastorius, Jack Bruce, John Paul Jones, Les Claypool, Geddy Lee, Paul McCartney, Flea, Tim Bogert, Doug Wimbish, Leland Sklar, Jeff Berlin, James Jamerson, Carol Kaye, Louis Satterfield, Charlie Mingus, Nathan East, Stu Hamm, Duck Dunn, Bootsy Collins, Larry Graham, Roger Waters, Geezer, Chris Squire, Billy Sheehan, Tony Levin, John Mung, Bernie Edwards, John Taylor.

Just off the top...
Last edited by dspellman at Apr 2, 2015,
#8
Singular person, multiple categories.

Entwistle.

Off stage he determined:

I like the Precision neck, but the Thunderbird Tone - So he made the FenderBirds, which later bore out the Alembic Boris and all of it's innovations, and yet later the Status Buzzard,

My strings do not sound quite right - so he got with Rotosound and created the benchmark standard for Rock Gauge strings giving proper sustain and tone that all else is measured by,

I need twice the power of Pete to make my bass be heard - so he laid the ground work for the stack wars that Hendrix would soon launch.

My higher tones are not represented out of my amp as I want them to be as I hear them in the studio. - So he created and toured with Bi-Amped systems.

My mids are not coming through tonight like last night - so he had the variable mid sweep put in his instrument.

I want lighter weight and more sustain - So the carbon fiber Buzzard was built.

I cannot decide if I want Scotch or Brandy on stage tonight - So he had strawed water bottles attached to his mic stand so he could nurse from either bottle at will.

Apparently this individual did so much that what he did defines us all.
Ibanez BTB 1006 Fretless and 405 (no Barts)
456 & 455(w/Barts)
Genz Benz NeoX400 112T & NeoX 112T cab.
Digitech BP-8 (x2)
Yamaha PB-1
Boss: SYB-5, PS-2, OD-20, EQ-20, PH-3,BF-3, CE-20, DD-20
Morely A/B
#9
Edgar Meyer is pretty cool.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#10
He doesn't always have the most technically challenging lines, but no other player comes as close to where I strive to be as a bassist as Timmy Commerford, so I feel that he deserves a look in. If technical skill were the prime determiner then we'd likely not need to look much further than the likes of Victor Wooten and Jeff Berlin. Neither consistently "do" it for me personally, despite having some work that is killer.

I guess what you can take away from this is that "best" is a largely subjective term in this context. I know there are people out there for whom Mark Hoppus is the pinnacle of bass playing. I don't claim to understand why, and there was a time that I'd aggressively argue that they needed to broaden their horizons but, eh... who the hell cares?
Spare a Cow
Eat a Vegan
#11
All I had to do is watch Geddy Lee once...crazy good...

I've tried to sing and play bass, not easy. He sings, plays bass, plays keys....and some very complicated bass parts, not just boring mindless two note country licks...while singing...

Entwistle...impressive. Great bass player.

Nobody has mentioned Donald Duck Dunn...Muscle Shoals crew in the 60's and 70's, played bass for everybody you can think of in the studio. Aretha Franklin, Boz Scaggs, Percy Sledge, a very long list of others.

Roger Waters...actually David Gilmour did the majority of Pink Floyd's bass parts, he would get tired of waiting for Waters to learn it and do it himself. Waters had to thank him for winning bass player of the year a couple of times. Waters was mediocre at best.

Chris Squier...amazing
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Apr 4, 2015,
#12
For me its it is James Jamerison and Duck Dunn, and for Jazz, Scott LaFaro. LaFaro died young, but his talent was immense.

I will also put a shout out for Edgar Meyer, who makes playing so freaking effortless its disgusting.
#14
Metal: Steve Harris
Rock: Geddy Lee, Flea
Funk/Jazz: Victor Wooten
Pop: No one in pop can play bass well
#16
Quote by liamjohnson20

Pop: No one in pop can play bass well

Probably the dumbest thing I've ever read.
Quote by Andron17
Go away, I have an erection.


Bassist for Half My Kingdom.
#17
Quote by liamjohnson20
Metal: Steve Harris
Rock: Geddy Lee, Flea
Funk/Jazz: Victor Wooten
Pop: No one in pop can play bass well


I'm game, what do you mean by "pop"? Its such a broad term, give an example...
#18
Quote by liamjohnson20
Metal: Steve Harris
Rock: Geddy Lee, Flea
Funk/Jazz: Victor Wooten
Pop: No one in pop can play bass well


Duran Duran though.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#20
This is why I asked what someone means when they say pop. If you go by the definition of top 40, then the following people (not a comprehensive list, I'm on a break at work, so this will have to do...) are 'bad' bassists

Mike Watt (played for Kelly Clarkson)
Louis Johnson (played on a number of Michael Jackson songs)
Jamareo Artis (plays for Bruno Mars)
Tony Kanal (played for Pink)
#21
There is no "best" bassist, only favorites. My fave is Steve Harris.
"Quick to judge. Quick to anger. Slow to understand. Ignorance and prejudice and fear walk hand-in-hand."
- Rush, "Witch Hunt"
#22
Leland Sklar, Timothy B. Schmidt, McCartney, Felix Pappalardi's left foot,
#23
Surprised no one said Alex Webster yet.
For how can I give the King his place of worth above all else
when I spend my time striving to place the crown upon myself?
#24
Quote by Ziphoblat
He doesn't always have the most technically challenging lines, but no other player comes as close to where I strive to be as a bassist as Timmy Commerford, so I feel that he deserves a look in.


I agree. Perhaps not the most technically accomplished player either, but his style fits the band's, which is what it's all about really isn't it
#25
Quote by deeptubes
There is no "best" bassist, only favorites.


So true. And then there is distinguishing between technique and creativity. I wouldn't call Chris Squire a technical master, at least not compared to fusion gurus like Stanley Clark, but the guy can't play a bad note and comes up with bass lines that nobody else could imagine.

Some others not mentioned yet:

Jazz/upright: Ron Carter.
Funk: Francis Prestia (Tower of Power); Bootsy Collins
Classic Rock: Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane)
#27
Quote by liamjohnson20
Metal: Steve Harris
Rock: Geddy Lee, Flea
Funk/Jazz: Victor Wooten
Pop: No one in pop can play bass well


One of the most popular radio tunes right now (Uptown Funk) has some pretty sweet bass. And don't you even dare say that that song is more funk than pop.
For how can I give the King his place of worth above all else
when I spend my time striving to place the crown upon myself?
#30
Mark Ronson was the guy playing the bass if what I've been told is correct then yeah he is a brilliant pop bassist but why would you say no pop bassist is good...I distinguish pop as in anything popular not the auto tuned crap on the radio
#32
John Paul Jones
Paul Mccartney
Cliff Burton
Jason Newsted
Flea
Bootsy Collins
Nathan East
Mark King
Stu Cook
Last edited by fabianaryo at May 14, 2015,
#35
Quote by Sliide90027
Singular person, multiple categories.

Entwistle.

Off stage he determined:

I like the Precision neck, but the Thunderbird Tone - So he made the FenderBirds, which later bore out the Alembic Boris and all of it's innovations, and yet later the Status Buzzard,

My strings do not sound quite right - so he got with Rotosound and created the benchmark standard for Rock Gauge strings giving proper sustain and tone that all else is measured by,

I need twice the power of Pete to make my bass be heard - so he laid the ground work for the stack wars that Hendrix would soon launch.

My higher tones are not represented out of my amp as I want them to be as I hear them in the studio. - So he created and toured with Bi-Amped systems.

My mids are not coming through tonight like last night - so he had the variable mid sweep put in his instrument.

I want lighter weight and more sustain - So the carbon fiber Buzzard was built.

I cannot decide if I want Scotch or Brandy on stage tonight - So he had strawed water bottles attached to his mic stand so he could nurse from either bottle at will.

Apparently this individual did so much that what he did defines us all.



The Boris bass, was that the Alembic explorer with the spider webs? I wonder where that is now. A million dollar bass for sure. I remember hearing him say that he was getting tired of all the equiptment hassles.. external pre-amps etc.. too much opportunity for problems. I 've seen guys with big enough hands get their pinky around the Alembic tone knob and use it almost as a wah effect.
I agree 100%. Monumental. A huge influence. He also had one of the best bass collections known to man. Eminence Front is an alltime favorite. Geddy's got to be there for playing and singing at the same time. John Paul was super smooth, and Jaco was a jazz geneous.
#36
Entwistle's legendary bass and guitar collection was sold by his heirs in May of 2003 at Southbey's Auction House. Sadly, this one-of-a-kind collection of the best electric and acoustic guitars and basses no longer exists.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1420595/Entwistles-guitar-sale-to-include-his-pink-Frankenstein.html
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#38
Quote by FatalGear41
Entwistle's legendary bass and guitar collection was sold by his heirs in May of 2003 at Southbey's Auction House. Sadly, this one-of-a-kind collection of the best electric and acoustic guitars and basses no longer exists.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1420595/Entwistles-guitar-sale-to-include-his-pink-Frankenstein.html


You can view the collection in this awesome piece of bass porn

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bass-Culture-Entwistle-Collection-Guitar/dp/1860745938