#1
Hi guys, I have a question, is there some sort of technique of bending strings on guitar with floating bridge, becouse when you bend, you increase the tension of the string and that causes the bridge to move so the pitch of the note change slightly. I'm trying to get it right, trying to control that final stage of bend where the tension maximize + keeping my picking hand layed on the bridge so it restrict its movement a little bit but the trouble comes with the "double notes bends", let's say this :



... where you only bend lower string, the upper goes out of tune, and it's pretty audible. Any advice ?

Thanks
#2
I found out that tuning my guitar in Eb don't change it's tuning... maybe that's the problem. When I used to play in Standard tuning had the same issue
#3
I've never encountered this issue. Maybe you have a poor quality floating bridge?
#4
^ No that's totally normal.

You either stop doing double stop bends, adjust your technique (so slightly bend the higher string as well to compensate), or put a bunch more springs on the bridge to make it tighter/put a tremstopper or something in there to stop it happening (but they affect how the trem feels in use).

there's no 100% cure that doesn't have other possible drawbacks (depending on your opinion), unfortunately.
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#5
it is a floyd rose 1000, there are no flaws on it, I cannot be the only one with this problem, I read multiple comments on internet about this but I didn't found any solution... You have floating tremolo too ? You don't have this problem when doing double-stops ? (or whatever they are called)
Last edited by Macejko at Apr 1, 2016,
#6
the string tension thing is what does you in with a trem and it really shows on floating trems. sadly so far no 100% solution. the one thing you can do is to fret the notes and pull up on the trem instead of doing the bends.
#7
I had this problem for a while. I just learned to compensate by adding a slight bend to the other string to get it back in tune.
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#8
Yeah, that's completely normal with a floating bridge. It's just physics. There's no way around it. Like others have said, the only thing you can do without modifying your tremolo in a way that might hinder other techniques, is add a little bit of bend to the second note in the double bend, to compensate. Personally, I've found that trying to hold the bridge down with your picking hand to keep it from coming up on a strong bend is just too awkward. Once you get used to it, applying the slight secondary bend for compensation is much easier, and it just feels natural.

My first guitar, which I've had for 9 years, has a Floyd Rose, so I got used to doing that very early on, before even fully understanding why I had to do that. When I bought a hardtail guitar, I actually had to train myself to stop doing the compensation bend.
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#9
Quote by monwobobbo
the string tension thing is what does you in with a trem and it really shows on floating trems. sadly so far no 100% solution. the one thing you can do is to fret the notes and pull up on the trem instead of doing the bends.


That's doesn't really help, unfortunately, because you still end up bending the pitches of both notes. Doing it with the trem just means that both notes go up, rather than one going down. The ideal with a bend like that is to bend one note up while the other doesn't move at all. Super easy with a hardtail guitar, but when the bridge is floating, it requires a second bend, and a bit of finesse.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#10
Hrmm, interesting to hear this is a common issue with floating bridges. I guess I'm just lucky to have never encountered this problem
#11
Quote by the_bi99man
That's doesn't really help, unfortunately, because you still end up bending the pitches of both notes. Doing it with the trem just means that both notes go up, rather than one going down. The ideal with a bend like that is to bend one note up while the other doesn't move at all. Super easy with a hardtail guitar, but when the bridge is floating, it requires a second bend, and a bit of finesse.


oops you're right didn't notice on the tab that only one note was being bent.
#12
Quote by vayne92
Hrmm, interesting to hear this is a common issue with floating bridges. I guess I'm just lucky to have never encountered this problem


If you do unison bends you should definitely notice. Sounds horrible unless you compensate by bending the note you shouldn't be bending.
#13
you have to bend both. the other one just a little bit, when you hear it right, you get used to it fast
#14
Quote by vayne92
Hrmm, interesting to hear this is a common issue with floating bridges. I guess I'm just lucky to have never encountered this problem

You can't not have encountered it, it's unavoidable if your bridge is floating. If you pull on something and the thing its anchored to moves then anything else attached to that anchor point will also move, you can't be exempt from the laws of physics, you probably just haven't noticed it.
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#15
Quote by vayne92
Hrmm, interesting to hear this is a common issue with floating bridges. I guess I'm just lucky to have never encountered this problem


Either your bridge isn't actually floating, or you just haven't noticed, for whatever reason. It can't be avoided, and literally every floating bridge ever made does it. It's just physics. A floating bridge is a balancing act between the strings and the springs. That's what makes it "float". When you put extra tension on the string by bending it, that pulls the bridge up, dropping tension (and therefore, pitch) on the other strings.

If you've got a floating bridge, pick an open string, then put a nice big full step bend on another string. If you don't hear the pitch of the ringing open string drop noticeably, your bridge isn't actually floating.
Guitars
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Orange Rockerverb 50 212
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#16
Quote by the_bi99man
Either your bridge isn't actually floating, or you just haven't noticed, for whatever reason. It can't be avoided, and literally every floating bridge ever made does it. It's just physics. A floating bridge is a balancing act between the strings and the springs. That's what makes it "float". When you put extra tension on the string by bending it, that pulls the bridge up, dropping tension (and therefore, pitch) on the other strings.

If you've got a floating bridge, pick an open string, then put a nice big full step bend on another string. If you don't hear the pitch of the ringing open string drop noticeably, your bridge isn't actually floating.


Interesting to hear. Makes sense. I haven't owned a guitar with a floating bridge for 6 months, but I'll definitely give it a shot when I next get my hands on one.