#1
My first post here and looking for advice, hope this is the place to come.

I have mostly played acoustic guitar and just sold my Hudson HD1000, and am looking to buy a Gibson Hummingbird, the problem is I am not a great guitarist and don't play live but I still like a nice tone. I had a Yamaha electro acoustic some years ago and thought it didn't have the tone of a normal acoustic that may have been me and the fact the Hudson was a dreadnought the Yamaha wasn't.

What do the experts and the guys who play live reckon, does an electro acoustic lose some of the tone compared to its counterpart acoustic only, when played simply acoustic? Hope that makes sense.
#2
The addition of a piezo pickup and a tiny solid state control box in the sides will have essentially no effect on a guitar's sound.
When you buy a cheap acoustic/electric, the electronics make up a fair bit of the price, and thus the manufacturer may cheap out a bit on the guitar itself.
This is not the case with better instruments.
The big advantage is convenience, you're not tied to a mic. If you play sitting down, and solo, a mic will be just fine.
If you want to stand up, move around, and play with a loud band...Then a built-in PU may be the way to go.
#3
The decision of electric acoustic or not depends on one thing. Do you need the electronics?

In my case, yes. I play acoustic onstage with a band, when looking for the Takamine I have now that was my first requirement, electronics.

Does it affect the sound? Not that I can tell. I don't know a lot about the cheaper models, I didn't try them but I suspect Bikewer may be right, manufacturers might skimp on quality of cheaper electric acoustics. Since I play it onstage, and have for 30 years, I wanted a quality instrument, so I avoided the cheaper models. My guitar has to last me a while, and I want it to sound good unplugged. I've played many, either onstage or trying them at music stores and pawn shops, I've never noticed any difference between the two. At least with the better quality guitars...

If you need the electronics, or expect to, look into an electric acoustic. If you don't, get a straight acoustic. After playing a cedar top Takamine for 12 years, I've been very impressed with cedar tops. Most acoustics are traditionally built with a spruce soundboard (top) and it sounds good. The one I have now is one of the best sounding guitars I tried while looking for one, I looked for a long time, trying to find a good neck. (I have a physical problem with my left hand and wrist that makes most fat acoustic necks unusable) The other guitar I found that I liked was gone when I went back to try it again, most others didn't meet my second requirement, a thin, playable neck. But this one had a sound that was great, nice neck, I got it.

Found out later looking up some info just out of curiosity, it has a cedar top. A little digging and it seems the cedar tops are well liked, if I have the chance to get another acoustic, I'll be looking at cedar tops first. Excellent full sound, great low end response, loads of sustain.

Other than that, look for one that feels good and sounds good to you, plays well, and I don't think the electronics will make a difference in sound that would be noticed, otherwise electric acoustics probably wouldn't exist, except in really cheap models...I don't think most reputable guitar makers would put their name on a high end guitar that sounds like crap because of the electronics. Gibson, Fender, Martin, Taylor and others all make electric acoustics that retail for over $1000, I don't see any of them doing that if the electronics have a detrimental affect on sound quality. My Takamine was around $800-900 retail when I got it...used and a lot cheaper though...

The problem I've found is the opposite, they tend to sound good unplugged, but really difficult to get them to sound like a true acoustic plugged in. Same for mine, it sounds great unplugged, I plug it in and have never been able to get a true acoustic sound from it. Close, but no cigar...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Apr 3, 2015,
#4
Quote by Paleo Pete
The decision of electric acoustic or not depends on one thing. Do you need the electronics?

In my case, yes. I play acoustic onstage with a band, when looking for the Takamine I have now that was my first requirement, electronics.

Does it affect the sound? Not that I can tell. I don't know a lot about the cheaper models, I didn't try them but I suspect Bikewer may be right, manufacturers might skimp on quality of cheaper electric acoustics. Since I play it onstage, and have for 30 years, I wanted a quality instrument, so I avoided the cheaper models. My guitar has to last me a while, and I want it to sound good unplugged. I've played many, either onstage or trying them at music stores and pawn shops, I've never noticed any difference between the two. At least with the better quality guitars...

If you need the electronics, or expect to, look into an electric acoustic. If you don't, get a straight acoustic. After playing a cedar top Takamine for 12 years, I've been very impressed with cedar tops. Most acoustics are traditionally built with a spruce soundboard (top) and it sounds good. The one I have now is one of the best sounding guitars I tried while looking for one, I looked for a long time, trying to find a good neck. (I have a physical problem with my left hand and wrist that makes most fat acoustic necks unusable) The other guitar I found that I liked was gone when I went back to try it again, most others didn't meet my second requirement, a thin, playable neck. But this one had a sound that was great, nice neck, I got it.

Found out later looking up some info just out of curiosity, it has a cedar top. A little digging and it seems the cedar tops are well liked, if I have the chance to get another acoustic, I'll be looking at cedar tops first. Excellent full sound, great low end response, loads of sustain.

Other than that, look for one that feels good and sounds good to you, plays well, and I don't think the electronics will make a difference in sound that would be noticed, otherwise electric acoustics probably wouldn't exist, except in really cheap models...I don't think most reputable guitar makers would put their name on a high end guitar that sounds like crap because of the electronics. Gibson, Fender, Martin, Taylor and others all make electric acoustics that retail for over $1000, I don't see any of them doing that if the electronics have a detrimental affect on sound quality. My Takamine was around $800-900 retail when I got it...used and a lot cheaper though...

The problem I've found is the opposite, they tend to sound good unplugged, but really difficult to get them to sound like a true acoustic plugged in. Same for mine, it sounds great unplugged, I plug it in and have never been able to get a true acoustic sound from it. Close, but no cigar...


Thanks that was just a great review, makes sense, I will go Electro