#1
Hey guys I have a question, exactly how do you start mixing up minor and major pentatonic for some good fun playing? I know my minor, I know that for major you have to move down (pitch-wise) 3 frets, but before anyone says "there are a ton of videos about this in youtube" I have to say that everytime I see look at a video about this topic, I never really see them explaining how to, all I see is the guy playing some mixed minor and major riff, then he talks a little about the concept, and then he explains how to play the riff he just played in the beginning, never have I seen really how to mix them to start practicing. any help guys?
I would be highly thankful if I get some help.
#2
I think for this it's easier if you don't think of them as two separate scales, but instead paying attention to the notes that are different between the major and minor. If you mix the Major and Minor pentatonic scales together you get a scale of 1 2 b3 3 4 5 6 b7.

If you look at the diatonic major and minor scales you'll see that the 2, 4, and 5 are the same for both, so the notes to pay attention to are the b3 and b7, which are from the minor, and the 3 and 6, which are from the major. The b3 is what makes minor scales sound minor, and the 3 is what make major scales sound major, and using both of them together just gives you a really bluesy sound. the 6 and b7 just help to contribute to the ambiguity. That is one thing to strive for when doing this - try to pay attention to how "major" or "minor" what you're playing sounds. You can go for a little more of a major sound, more of a minor sound, or try to strike a balance in the middle that's hard to tell what it is. It's really up to you. Just basically write riffs and licks the same way you would using a major or minor scale, but pay extra attention to your thirds.
#3
First of all: Your key must be major. And you can play minor pentatonic (parallel) and vary. I tend to move from the minor third to the major third while soloing. I guess that has to do with tension that the minor third builds over a major backing. Just experiment.
#4
I move between the two a lot. Playing the blues I often set the stage slowly with minor, go to major to introduce a fresh theme or groove and finish with a big descending minor pent riff. Add in some diminished scale leading to the IV chord gives a jazz sensibility to the blues. (Robben Ford secret sauce)

Lay down a Stormy Monday or Thrill is Gone backing track and experiment until you find some gold. Take what you need from great players and then make it your own.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
Quote by DarkF1ame777
Hey guys I have a question, exactly how do you start mixing up minor and major pentatonic for some good fun playing? I know my minor, I know that for major you have to move down (pitch-wise) 3 frets, but before anyone says "there are a ton of videos about this in youtube" I have to say that everytime I see look at a video about this topic, I never really see them explaining how to, all I see is the guy playing some mixed minor and major riff, then he talks a little about the concept, and then he explains how to play the riff he just played in the beginning, never have I seen really how to mix them to start practicing. any help guys?


I found the advanced pentatonic lessons at mike dodge.com pretty helpful.

That being said, look, the real "how to" is this:

Achieve enough mastery of the sounds of the major and minor pentatonic that you can intuitively and comfortably shift between them without having to think about it.

You have to develop your ear until you no longer hear a scale as a collection of "safe" notes but rather as a set of tones which each have their own unique relationship to the tonic. Then you solo by picking which of those unique relationships you want to hear.

There are no real shortcuts to doing this well.
#6
The most common way to mix major and minor is a lick like this (over E major chord):

e|-----0-
B|-----0-
G|-0h1---
D|-------
A|-------
E|-------


It uses a hammer on from the minor third to the major third. Works pretty much over any major chord.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
Wow this is amazing, I don't care about how long stuff takes, I like to learn my things well, without pressuring myself, I'm 16 and I still have many more years to live so I like to take my time on everything, that being said I want to thank all of you amazing and awesome people that helped me with this, thanks so much guys!
#8
What could help is to learn about scale construction, scale degrees and intervals. If you understand the structure of the major and minor scales, you'll also understand how they differ from each other when it comes to sound. Major scale is 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; minor scale is 1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7.

Major pentatonic is 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and minor pentatonic is 1, b3, 4, 5, b7. And as said, when you combine them, you get 1, 2, b3, 3, 4, 5, 6, b7. In A it would be A, B, C, C#, D, E, F#, G. It will work well over bluesy sounding stuff (with major tonic chord).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
Quote by MaggaraMarine
The most common way to mix major and minor is a lick like this (over E major chord):

e|-----0-
B|-----0-
G|-0h1---
D|-------
A|-------
E|-------


It uses a hammer on from the minor third to the major third. Works pretty much over any major chord.


+1 (or you can bend the minor third either completely sharp so it becomes a major third, or a little sharp so it sounds really bluesy.)

I'm not a massive fan of switching between those two positions as it can kind of sound disjointed if you're not careful. (then again if it's that or nothing, it's probably better than nothing.)

EDIT: also +1 to post above
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