#1
Heya!

I've been strolling through several youtube videos,wikipedia articles and the several Mode threads around on this forum. (holy crap some of them is so heavy to read,much props to the persons writing them though!)

The youtube videos never explain to me what I want to know,neither do the wikipedia articles,or maybe it's just that I've been stuck for this so long that I've given myself a tunnel vision,rendering me absolutely blind to what is,perhaps the most basic stuff....

And these mode threads on the forums,as I said,it's alot of heavy reading. ALOT of heavy reading which I feel I'm not yet ready to fully dive into. At this point I just want to understand how you go about to make chords for a mode,namely the Phrygian Dominant mode that I have a huge love for.

Up until I read through Jazz_rock_feel's immensely informative thread (see 1.) on the topic I thought of modes as a key,which from what the little my brain could understand from that thread is wrong. Modes are something in itself? Right? And that "normal" chord progressions would not work with a mode.

So,what kind of chords DO work with a mode? How do you go about creating a chord progression (or just chords for that matter) for that specific mode,in my example the Phrygian Dom.?

When you decide the chords for a major scale you have the;
-Tonic as a Major (I)
-Supertonic as a minor (ii)
-Mediant as a minor (iii)
-Subdominant as a Major (IV)
-Dominant as a Major (V)
-Submediant as a minor (vi)
-Leading Tone as a diminished (vii)

Do you use I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-vii way of deciding what kind of chords for the Phrygian Dom. as well,seeing as it is an alteration of the major scale?

I'm confused,blind,and damn hungry.lol.


1. https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1660589
#2
To know what chords work with the scale, you need to harmonize it. Phrygian dominant uses the same notes as harmonic minor so the chords are also the same. How to make it sound like phrygian dominant and not like harmonic minor? Well, how do you make A minor sound like Am and not C major? It's all about the tonic. Try progressions like E major - F major or D minor and play E phrygian dominant over it.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
Ahhh so the Harmonic minor and the Phrygian Dominant mode share the same intervals,I see. Cool

I'll get right on too it! Thanks man!
#4
You're gonna want to read the sequel to that thread.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1660895&highlight=mode+war

To answer your question:

The most common (read: more or less only) use of Phrygian dominant is:

1. To solo over a Phrygian dominant modal framework (Ex. E7-Fmaj7)

2. Over a V chord going to a minor chord.

#1. Is confusing if you don't know what makes a chord sequence modal (read the thread, itll explain I promise)

#2. Is no different from using a harmonic minor scale normally, hence the confusion.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
ok the Phrygian dom mode is the 5th degree of the harmonic minor scale..

harmonic min scale -
B C# D E F# G A#/Bb
1 2 b3 4 5 6 7

Phrygian Dom scale--starting form the 5th degree--
F# G A#/Bb B C# D E
1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7

some Phrygian Dom chords produced from the scale--note it has a b2/b9 and a #5/b6 degree in the scale..so altered chords and their sounds are produced

F#7b9 -(is also an A7b9 C7b9 Eb7b9) F#7#5 F#7b9#5 F#7sus

use the scale over these chords..and use these chords resolving into Bmi7 Bmi9 Bmi11

this will give you an idea of the use and sound of the scale/chords
play well

wolf
#6
I think the most important thing is the tonic. If your progression sounds like it resolves to E major and the chords fit the scale, the scale will work well over the progression. It doesn't really matter if the progression is actually modal or not. If you want to use E phrygian dominant, the chords are the same as in A harm. minor. Now you just need to play a progression that resolves to E major, not A minor. The less chords you use, the easier it is to make it sound like E is your tonic. E - F is the most common phrygian dominant sounding progression.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
Exactly, because most of those chords are going to pull A minor.

You need to create a modal framework to prevent that.

E- F is by far the most common one.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#9
Well, you don't know us that well. Give it time, we'll let you down one day.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp