#1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RvmfTnMncE

hi, this is the first time i learn how to record using micing amp method. Somehow i don't really satisfied with the tone, i placed the mic in every posibble position but still can't get the tone i want.
as u can hear the tone i recorded was abit hollow, not tight enough.

my question is how to get the tone more heavy and tight when we do recording through micing amp?
#2
See if rising your mids works out and pulling the mic an inch or 2 from the grill.

Also your videos output appears to be panned hard left. Why?
Quote by chookiecookie
Go penis them

hard
#3
ok, i'll try see if it works
btw, i recorded double track for the rhythm, placing the mic at the edge left and right
#4
The two mic techniques I typically use are:

1. On center on axis--- bold, in-your-face tone popularized in the 80s and 90s.

2. Off center off axis--- mic capsule located 1/2 way between center speaker and outer edge, pointing at the center, 45 degree angle. This was developed by Les Paul in the 50s and generally results in a smoother, more natural guitar tone than placement #1.

There are dozens of other possibilities but one of these two just always seems to work for me. Double tracking guitars and panning R/L often results in much bigger sound that would make Phil Spector proud.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
Quote by Igax
ok, i'll try see if it works
btw, i recorded double track for the rhythm, placing the mic at the edge left and right

The rhythm and leads sound only on the left headphone. On the right headphone almost nothing. The drums are centered and fine as far as panning goes. I'm using DT 770 heaphones btw.
Quote by chookiecookie
Go penis them

hard
Last edited by NecroComet at Apr 6, 2015,
#6
Quote by NecroComet
The rhythm and leads sound only on the left headphone. On the right headphone almost nothing. The drums are centered and fine as far as panning goes. I'm using DT 770 heaphones btw.


only now i realized the guitar sound only on the left headphone, cuz im using pc speaker.
i'll try to record again base on the advise given, thank you guys.
#7
I can't help with any recording tips so I'm sorry that I can't contribute to the conversation in that sense. I just wanted to say that I enjoyed this riff you put together.
#8
How loud is the amp? From the photos, I'm not sure why you wouldn't be getting the in-your-face sound you're looking for. I'd predict (without hearing it, just based on the photos) that, if anything, you'd be getting a sound that was "crispier" than you might want.

For recording guitars, I always do the following two things as a starting point:
1. Get the guitar sounding the way you want it in the room. That might require turning it up a bit. That's your starting point.
2. Now, while you are playing get your ear down to that puppy and give it a good listen from where the mic is going to go. Are you going to put the mic right up to the grille? Then listen to it right at the grille. (don't linger... just nip in for a few seconds... save your hearing) If you put the amp on a chair or something, you won't have to get down on your knees with your guitar while you play.
3. Adjust your tone based on what you're hearing in #2, because that's what the mic is hearing. This is where you might (or not) decide to back off on the gain.

THEN record.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
The way I fine tune mic placement is via iso headphones, moving it around until I hear what I like.
Try starting at 90 degree angle at the cone and move down the speaker a bit for starters, not changing the 90 degree angle.I'd say maybe 2 or 3 inches with mic as close to grille as possible.

Don't forget that you will most likely eq afterwards to make room for other instruments and add bite, maybe even compress a bit.

http://www.guitarplayer.com/miscellaneous/1139/5-mix-saving-eq-tips/22016
Last edited by diabolical at Apr 9, 2015,
#10
Quote by cheosamad
I can't help with any recording tips so I'm sorry that I can't contribute to the conversation in that sense. I just wanted to say that I enjoyed this riff you put together.


no problem..at least we learn something from others
glad to know u like this riff
#11
Quote by axemanchris
How loud is the amp? From the photos, I'm not sure why you wouldn't be getting the in-your-face sound you're looking for. I'd predict (without hearing it, just based on the photos) that, if anything, you'd be getting a sound that was "crispier" than you might want.

For recording guitars, I always do the following two things as a starting point:
1. Get the guitar sounding the way you want it in the room. That might require turning it up a bit. That's your starting point.
2. Now, while you are playing get your ear down to that puppy and give it a good listen from where the mic is going to go. Are you going to put the mic right up to the grille? Then listen to it right at the grille. (don't linger... just nip in for a few seconds... save your hearing) If you put the amp on a chair or something, you won't have to get down on your knees with your guitar while you play.
3. Adjust your tone based on what you're hearing in #2, because that's what the mic is hearing. This is where you might (or not) decide to back off on the gain.

THEN record.

CT


The lead volume is at 7 o'clock, but the master vol is only 2 o'clock, Should i turn the master vol up?
anyway thanks for the tips, i do appreciate it!..thank you
#12
Quote by diabolical
The way I fine tune mic placement is via iso headphones, moving it around until I hear what I like.
Try starting at 90 degree angle at the cone and move down the speaker a bit for starters, not changing the 90 degree angle.I'd say maybe 2 or 3 inches with mic as close to grille as possible.

Don't forget that you will most likely eq afterwards to make room for other instruments and add bite, maybe even compress a bit.

http://www.guitarplayer.com/miscellaneous/1139/5-mix-saving-eq-tips/22016


yeah, i tried a lot of [position for mic placement to find the tone i wanted, still failed to get it.
i'll check gain and see if i miss out something

the sad things is i don't know the technique how to mix and eq, though im using nuendo to record. The video above is raw recording
#13
Quote by Igax
The lead volume is at 7 o'clock, but the master vol is only 2 o'clock, Should i turn the master vol up?
anyway thanks for the tips, i do appreciate it!..thank you

My master is usually at 7 and the amp starts to sing, you can actually hear it. Don't know what to tell you on this amp. I'd be happy to help you pinpoint problem areas, I'm sure other guys will too if you provide some raw tracks to mix.

Some tips on mixing heavy guitar:

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/nov09/articles/metal.htm

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/dec09/articles/metalII.htm

Look at image5 for one type of eq curve.

I think you'd need to listen in context.

How old is your amp? When was last serviced (new tubes)? Guitar type? How old are your strings?
What pick do you use? Do you add overdrive in front? Do you have other mics?
Last edited by diabolical at Apr 10, 2015,
#14
Quote by diabolical
My master is usually at 7 and the amp starts to sing, you can actually hear it. Don't know what to tell you on this amp. I'd be happy to help you pinpoint problem areas, I'm sure other guys will too if you provide some raw tracks to mix.

Some tips on mixing heavy guitar:

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/nov09/articles/metal.htm

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/dec09/articles/metalII.htm

Look at image5 for one type of eq curve.

I think you'd need to listen in context.

How old is your amp? When was last serviced (new tubes)? Guitar type? How old are your strings?
What pick do you use? Do you add overdrive in front? Do you have other mics?



i can only set my master volume around 4o'clock since im staying at an apartment.
How old is your amp?
1year

When was last serviced (new tubes)?
i bought this amp from a friend, and he used it for around 1 year only, so nvr sent for service.

Guitar type?
im using jackson RR24 with mick thompson blackout active pickup

How old are your strings?
i think nearly 1 year

What pick do you use?
Dunlop Jazz III

Do you add overdrive in front?
yes, TC electronic Spark Booster

Do you have other mics?
No, only 1 mic Shure Sm57
#15
Tc booster - try the different settings, probably not "fat". Set it up touch brighter than usual.
Try different gain settings, less gain from amp, more from overdrive pedal, etc.
Try cranking the master as loud as you can at least for a test.
What about the amp without pedal in front?
It could be possible that some of these tubes are worn out, I mean it is an Engl, can't believe you're not getting good metal tones. I'd have a tech do full tube swap, unless it is self biasing which you can do yourself, check the amp forum for what types, I'd say JJs.
I've recorded quite a few metal bands but for the most part it has been Marshall, Mesa and Peaveys and used the sm57 on a lot of these sessions, but unfortunately I don't know this particular Engl and what it could do.

Well, maybe share the session files as mp3 on here or pm me and I'd see what could be done mixing it.
Last edited by diabolical at Apr 10, 2015,
#17
wow..bro, thanks for the tips, info and links. i really learn something from that.
btw, i just check your sound cloud, what a nice recording u have, awesome.
especially this song HighEnergyFracture..nice one

here i try to record again

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5BSvGyw0sc
Last edited by Igax at Apr 12, 2015,
#18
Sounds better (on my tablet anyway), like you're getting better articulation and it sounds more dense, as in metal vs aor :-)
BTW, noticed you had phantom on (48v) on your interface, this is for condenser mics, in the case of the sm57 you don't need it as it is dynamic.
Thanks for checking my tunes!
#19
Quote by diabolical

BTW, noticed you had phantom on (48v) on your interface, this is for condenser mics, in the case of the sm57 you don't need it as it is dynamic.


hi..many thanks for the info.