#1
What's your opinion on going justin guitar and finishing his begginer and intermidiate courses even though i might not use that like all those fancy chords because i'm more interested about metalcore song playing. How did you guys learn? Did you finish some tutorial list just to get base for things or you just learning what you wan't and what you won't use you don't learn.
#2
You should learn what interests you.
"When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. This is my religion." -- Abraham Lincoln
#3
Whilst that's true to as certain extent basics are basics - without covering some of the fundamental aspects of playing the guitar early on you will find it harder to make progress.

The Justin guitar courses are an excellent idea because that's exactly what they are, beginner courses designed to help you get the basics under your belt. It's all important stuff that will help you throughout your time learning to play even if it doesn't seem particularly relevant to your interests right now.
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Everybody does things differently, of course. Me....When I get interested in something, I learn as much as I can about it. With guitar, back in the 70s, I subscribed to Guitar Player for 10 years and read every issue cover to cover, even the stuff I didn't intend to do.
I read books on the history of the guitar, it's origins and construction and the theory of how sound works. That's all aside from the music theory stuff....
Never regretted a word of it.
I've seen young lads who could play some rock god's solo note-for-note,, but didn't know a bridge from a saddle and could not tell you what a major chord was and though that SRV invented the blues...

It's a process, sir. Dig in.
#5
I've had one for nearly 15 years and I don't know anything

It's up to you, really. As mark said, the justin guitar course is a very good grounding/foundation for your playing, and if you have the willpower to stick with it will really help.

If you don't, though, there's no harm in trying to learn stuff which is more geared towards the stuff you want to play now. You'd be far better learning the stuff you want than quitting in frustration because you're bored out of your mind.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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#6
My first guitar lesson, the teacher asked me what I wanted to learn. I told him I wanted to learn how to solo. I had been an acoustic strummer for 20 years and wanted to change direction. He said fine, "this is what I'll teach you."

So over the next six months I learned notes, staff reading, and how to play the pentaatonic scales (every key, every position). These fundamentals started me to playing a lead and so much more.

Point is, there are things you want to learn but more importantly things you need to learn. Sure, you can jump ahead and try harder things. That won't help your development. Start at the beginning. Justin is excellent. A lot there to learn.

It's a journey.

🎸
Last edited by gravitycure at Apr 5, 2015,
#7
Just thinking this. I don't really like acoustic songs but i also don't wan't to be someone who says he plays guitar and cant answer questions like " Hey what chords is this guy playing in that song? "me - i don't know i only play metalcore so i don't know much about anything else" I'm just curious how other people wen't about learning
#8
Well basically everything everyone says you can't/shouldn't do when starting out or learning I did.

So yeah. I'm not sure if that means I'm full of it and shouldn't be listened to, or whether it means that the people saying you can only do it one way are full of it and shouldn't be listened to. I'll let you make your own mind up on that one.

But yeah I know what you mean- it can be annoying if you're really good at one (possibly more obscure) genre but can't play songs everyone knows or know answers to what people think are simple questions.

i guess there's nothing to hinder you doing both- say split your practice time 50:50, half towards what you want to play/learn, half towards what you think you should be learning to be a more-rounded player.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Apr 5, 2015,
#9
How did I learn?

Back in 1988 when I got my very first acustic Jasmine S60 which I still got I had some basic lessons as that was what you were suppossed to do or something. The obvious thing.

But I did not have a clue on what I wanted to learn or heard a guitar as should that would inspire me in any direction. Exept one thing was smoke on the water at a former school buddy and I took that to my teacher where he then showed me the main riff on the low E.

By 9 and 10 grade the school I was at had a lot of different people not just 6 from the same local area so thrashy metal were quickly catching my ears and the desire to get an electric guitar and as far as me being a guitar player until then? Yeah right!

So by 1991 I save up for my first electric Applause Stratocaster and find out that you can TAB notification books on your favorite artist so I got Kill'em'all and Black Album by Metallica send to me.

From then on it was just me and my ears learning from books or found out by ear how to play what I wanted. How to make it sound right.

Never used online methods but old school books and cassette tape.

It took a while but now I know what I need to do in order to play anything I want so yes now I can play and enjoy it.
Last edited by anders.jorgense at Apr 5, 2015,
#10
I think it is a question of striking a balance between learning things that interest you - absolutely essential, IMO - and basic theory and other genres that provide theoretical support. In my case I did a couple of years of piano lessons that got me nowhere with piano because the material was totally uninteresting, but it did give me a grounding in theory; this turned out to be very useful when I took up guitar a few years later. If I hadn't done that, I would have had to spend more of my inital guitar time on theory. Then, although I was mostly interested in folk and blues, I took a few classical lesson at the same time, again as background training, not because I wanted to play classical.

So it is case of mix and match. If you are interested in performing, I think you have to get out of your comfort and interest zone to some extent, but you need the interest to keep you motived - just like choosing a guitar/amp that you like. You have to want to play music, not the guitar.
#11
I learning 5 months I know 8 chords lol 2 songs lol, I also know nothing
But iam haveing fun just strumming the chords I know
#12
Quote by Tony Done
I think it is a question of striking a balance between learning things that interest you - absolutely essential, IMO - and basic theory and other genres that provide theoretical support.


Yeah I think so.

The other thing is, as long as you can keep the interest and don't quit, I think that's the main thing- as I said, I totally started out, and indeed for the first several years, shamelessly learning what I wanted to and ignoring everything else (and even still to a pretty big extent I do the absolute bare minimum, and probably not even that much, of what I "should" learn ).

That's maybe not the generally accepted way to do it- but because I was interested, I didn't quit. That meant that then when I did feel like expanding a bit more into the stuff I felt I "should" know, I could do that. Whereas had I tried to learn that stuff when i wasn't interested, I might have just quit.

So that's worth bearing in mind.

The other thing is, everyone will have a slightly different idea of what you "should" know. So don't be too put off by people saying, "Oh, you have to know this!" etc. etc. Maybe they don't know stuff that you think they "should" know.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?