#2
I remember in Audioslave Chris Cornell claimed to write most of the music. He was a guitarist as well, but didn't play guitar in the band. He'd write the skeletons of the songs, with the lyrics and chord progressions, and the other members would spice them up with their own playing styles. Morello would write riffs over them, Commerford would do his thing on the bass, and Wilk would write the drums.

According to Cornell, he wrote most of the music so he believed he should take most of the money, and that's why the band split.

It's not exactly what you're looking for, but it's the closest I can get off the top of my head.
#3
Quote by Amuro Jay
I remember in Audioslave Chris Cornell claimed to write most of the music. He was a guitarist as well, but didn't play guitar in the band. He'd write the skeletons of the songs, with the lyrics and chord progressions, and the other members would spice them up with their own playing styles. Morello would write riffs over them, Commerford would do his thing on the bass, and Wilk would write the drums.

According to Cornell, he wrote most of the music so he believed he should take most of the money, and that's why the band split.

It's not exactly what you're looking for, but it's the closest I can get off the top of my head.


It's exactly what I was looking for. Thank you very much!
Last edited by xTURTLENECKx at Apr 10, 2015,
#6
Tame Impala (Kevin Parker). Not only does he write all the music and lyrics, he even plays ALL of the instruments on the album/studio version of songs, drums included.

From Wikipedia:
Parker's decision to make the music for Tame Impala in the studio by himself is a result of Parker liking "the kind of music that is the result of one person constructing an awesome symphony of sound. You can layer your own voice 700 times for half a second if you want, and I just love that kind of music."[57] However, Parker has to translate his music to a live setting with the band, and the band doesn't play the songs until they have been recorded. "The only jamming that's done as a band is done a long time after the song is recorded for the sake of the live environment. It's good for us, because we can take a song that's been recorded and do what we want to it: slow it down, speed it up, make it 10 seconds or 10 minutes long. It gives us a lot of freedom."


It seems I agree with him. Of Montreal and The Strokes are both great as well (just learned to play Welcome to Japan and 50/50 in the past few weeks)
Last edited by bptrav at Apr 14, 2015,