#1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNco0AQa6nU

Find this type of music so relaxing.

Can anyone just give me some basic understanding of composing such pieces? I imagine harmonic minor is the go-to scale?

The lead just sounds amazing. No clue what type of chords are used for the rhythm or anything. Does anyone write or play anything sort of in this category? I would love some idea of where to just get started in terms of theory, resources, techniques, etc.

Thanks so much
#2
I didn't listen because no headphones, but harmonic minor is usually to go to scale when you need a major dominant (which is most of the time in Western music). It's used in conjunction with the natty minor.

Judging by the name, it's probably classically-influenced, so it'll be beneficial to be familliar with the following concepts, and know how to apply them to your playing and composition:

Scales
Triads
Harmony
Diatonic chords
Construction of embellished chords (7-13 and everything in between)
Use of basic chromatic harmony techniques
Key changes

Like I said, I couldn't listen right now, but in terms of technique, in order to convey a "relaxing" feeling, I would go for as much legato (smooth) playing as possible. This means slides, bends, hammer ons and pull offs, etc.
Last edited by one vision at Apr 6, 2015,
#3
Judging by the sound and name of it, it's most likely Phrygian dominant scale (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrygian_dominant_scale).
It's pretty easy to get into it and once you've got a bit of understanding, you can play along to almost any spanish/latin/carribean sounding song there is. It's pretty easy to write with it too, you can blend flawlessly over from harmonic minor into phrygian dominant scale and back.
It's also called 'Spanish scale' as far as I know.
"If it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic.'
Lewis Carroll
#4
Not trying to hijack TS's topic, but since the music sounded Flamenco, any idea on how to play those Flamenco kinda guitar playing? I am exploring more towards those type of playing now, since I have been playing Rock/Metal for quite some time. I guess I needed a bit of a fresh air...
#6
The "relaxing" feel of the song isn't about scales or anything like that. It has to do with the tempo and rhythm. It has a lot to do with the rhythm instruments. Also, the melody has a pretty "free" rhythm - it is played pretty freely. Very "rubato". Oh, and it also has to do with the instruments they use. The instruments sound pretty soft.

I would just ignore scales for a while. They are not everything there is to music. Of course the note choice is also important when it comes to the feeling of a piece, but it's not everything. Minor doesn't always sound sad, major doesn't always sound happy.

The first song does use harmonic minor at certain parts, but not all the time. Listen to the chords - they pretty much tell you what scale to use. The first song used a basic circle of fifths chord progression (in Am it would be Am-Dm7-G7-Cmaj7-Fmaj7-Bm7b5-E7). You can't play harmonic minor over it all the time. It has to do with the chords you are playing over.

If you want to write music, don't just pick a scale and start noodling around. Listen to the sounds in your head. I usually come up with the basic groove of the song first. If you want a similar feel, just use a similar rhythm track. Change the chords a bit, come up with a different melody. But remember to use your ears, not just your fingers.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#7
Quote by MaggaraMarine

If you want to write music, don't just pick a scale and start noodling around. Listen to the sounds in your head. I usually come up with the basic groove of the song first. If you want a similar feel, just use a similar rhythm track. Change the chords a bit, come up with a different melody. But remember to use your ears, not just your fingers.


This x 1000.

If you want to learn a style, learn specific songs. Preferably by ear.

Sit down and figure out, by ear, the various little melodic riffs in this song.

If you can't do that, do ear training work until you can.

When you've figured out, by ear, a dozen songs in a certain style - and heck, it probably won't take a dozen - you'll probably find yourself able to create in that style without trying particularly hard. Of course, requires a certain baseline level of fundamental skill, but them's the breaks. You're not going to be a good musician without solid fundamentals.
#8
I think learning diatonic harmony, and how scales work with chords, and then understanding harmonic analysis, and chord tones, and then venturing into deriving what the chord progression might be, is a great way to go on this. To get to the point where you Identify what minor chord it is, and then ascertain what other chors might work in this key, and then understand the scale. It's all about those things, and learning what works and why is a lot of fun and very fulfilling.

But you cannot start there. To understand you must understand the most beginning concepts and be able to work within them. That can be from self study, or a school, or whatever, but it's a great path to understand what's going on, be able to replicate it, and play with understanding. Not to mention the elements of tone rhythm, and phrasing.

Best,

Sean