#1
Hi Guys any helps appreciated here

Im wondering how people use capos when their playing with another guitrist who isnt using one

an example is Oasis, Gem very rarely ever used a Capo but Noel would use one on the same song say on the 5th fret or 7th

how does this work and what chords would you pay etc if using the capo

Thanks Guys
#2
You just play chords that are built upon the same root. A guitarist playing the normal D shape (X00232) would sound similar to a guitarist playing an A shape chord with a capo on 5 (X577755).

Here, the root of the chord is D. In the first guitarist's playing, the root is in the D string (which is open) and the B string (3). In the second guitarist's playing, the root is in the A string and the G string.
#3
Basically, a D chord is a D chord. Doesn't matter how it's played, as long as the notes are there. Different voicings produce different feels, obviously, but the notes are still the same notes. Same with any other chord. So, a capo doesn't necessarily dictate what keys you can play in, it just changes what your open chord shapes are. As long as you know what chords you're playing, and what the other guys are playing, you can work around a capo, like the guys in Oasis do, among others.

They're also great for when one guitarist is downtuned. I keep my Hellraiser in D standard (one step down) because I like the way it feels, and I prefer that tuning for most of my original music. But I jam with people in standard tuning sometimes. In those situations, I throw a capo on the second fret, and I'm right there with the other guitarist.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#4
Quote by Will Lane
You just play chords that are built upon the same root. A guitarist playing the normal D shape (X00232) would sound similar to a guitarist playing an A shape chord with a capo on 5 (X577755).

Here, the root of the chord is D. In the first guitarist's playing, the root is in the D string (which is open) and the B string (3). In the second guitarist's playing, the root is in the A string and the G string.


To add to this, they are harmonizing. In the key, we'll use C major as an example, you have 8 notes in it's scale (C major scale for a C major key). CDEFGABC. You know how playing two C's of different octaves has a distinctive sound to it? They are the strongest form of harmony.

The next strongest is a "perfect 5th", which is what power chords are based on. They have a distinct sound to them. In C major, this is C and G.

One guitarist could be playing in C major, the other in G major (keys). All the chords they strike have that "perfect fifth" relationship. Other popular relationships are 3rds (which are in major chords along with 5ths) and 4ths. Play this, it is an example of a 5th, a 4th, and a 3rd:

d|-5---3----2---------
a|-3---3----3-----------

Skip to 2:25. When the second guitarist comes in during the solo, they are playing different notes, but each note is exactly a third (or some other relationship, don't know) apart from each other. They are essentially playing chords, and it sounds ****ing awesome.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSR6ZzjDZ94
Last edited by The Bacon Man at Apr 9, 2015,