#1
Hi there, I have been playing guitar for almost 2 years on my own. I want to be a lead guitarist for a thrash metal band. I am kinda intermediate guitarist but that's about it. I'm stuck in a rut without any proper progress. Sometimes I feel that I should quit.

I would really appreciate if you can suggest me a guitar practice routine that would improve my technical side and creativity as well.

I have a day job and can spare about 2.5 hrs.
#2
If you want to play in a band, join a band. You may not be able to play lead guitar yet, but that doesn't really matter - just play the rhythm. You need to learn to play in a band, and you will only learn to do it by playing in a band. It can also motivate you, and it will pretty much force you to learn new songs every now and then.

If your goal is to become a thrash metal lead guitarist, just learn a lot of thrash metal solos. Speed picking is pretty important, and you can learn it just by playing songs. Remember to play slowly enough - it is important to play it correctly. If you just force the speed, you may learn bad habits. If you feel like you are struggling, slow it down a bit and try again.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
Lead guitarist, for most part, requires you to play a 'beautiful passage' during the solo part. If you aspire yourself to be a lead guitarist, I really suggest that you learn blues, coz it's the basic for every lead guitarist out there.

I know that advise may turned you off, but trust me, it works, even if you're playing Metal. How do I know? Well, I was in your shoes in the past. And learning to play blues is what helped me to be able to play lead guitar properly.

If I were you, I'd use at about half an hour of listening to Blues, one hour of jamming along to Blues music, and another hour of jamming along some metal songs.
#4
Learn to play scales, learn how intervals work, experiment. Learn your theory, it's important. You don't have to be Tchaikovsky, but you do need to have a basic understanding of what it is that you're doing.

For technicality, just sit down with a metronome and play everything slowly, accurately, and comfortably. The key isn't to be able to play something, it's to play it effortlessly and without mistake. It's not enough just to make it through straining, you have to be comfortable with something to the point where it's locked into your bones before you push yourself forward. Accuracy is the key to speed, not muscle strain.

Practice your alternate picking, your noise muting, and your legato. Don't even think about sweep picking until you're really good at those.

An hour of scale practice, working on your techniques. Learn each note by name. Play slowly, accurately, and efficiently along with a metronome. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of patience and accuracy. I'm repeating it for a reason.

An hour of studying theory. Learn notation, then intervals, then basic chord construction, harmony, composition etc.

Spend the last half hour practicing songs. Don't push too hard or you'll end up with sloppy technique, slow down and use a metronome, or play something easier.

You should understand that there is no real line dividing rhythm and lead guitarists though. They're in no way at all independent skill sets. It's pretty important for a lead player to understand how chords function, so that they can harmonize, use arpeggios, or even just intersperse chords throughout lead sections. A guitarist who can't play rhythm isn't really worth the space they take up in the van.

AND REMEMBER TO PRACTICE SLOWLY
#5
Hi saulwwe90

Here are some steps:

1-Know exacly what you want.

2-Find out what a Lead thrash metal guitarist needs to know, and don't waste time in anything else

3-A good teacher will speed your progress, to have you playing in your band as soon as possible.

4-Practice

5-meet other musicians.

END

I can't give you a practice Schedule because:

1- I don't know how to do a proper one
2-Effective practice shecule/routines, are specifically for your needs and change as you progress

Tom hess has a practice routine generator in his website, that's what I use.

Ruts are terrible it will kill your motivation, Learn about effective practice, vídeos in youtube, books, most important get a good teacher.


Best of luck!
#6
I don't know much about metal (I write pop-punk shit) but I do know what has helped me a lot in beginning to master the type of style I want to write/play is learning songs in that style. The key is not just to look at tab and be able to play it, but pick it apart and understand how the song is constructed, what harmonies are going on, key changes, chord progressions, etc. Since you want to be a lead guitarist I highly recommend transcribing as many solos as possible. When trying to learn a hard solo play SLOWLY and ACCURATELY. Trust me, this doesn't just go for guitar, I play the clarinet and it's the same thing when trying to learn a difficult technical passage. Don't speed it up until you can play it flawlessly.
#7
Quote by Wolforn
Learn to play scales, learn how intervals work, experiment. Learn your theory, it's important. You don't have to be Tchaikovsky, but you do need to have a basic understanding of what it is that you're doing.

For technicality, just sit down with a metronome and play everything slowly, accurately, and comfortably. The key isn't to be able to play something, it's to play it effortlessly and without mistake. It's not enough just to make it through straining, you have to be comfortable with something to the point where it's locked into your bones before you push yourself forward. Accuracy is the key to speed, not muscle strain.

Practice your alternate picking, your noise muting, and your legato. Don't even think about sweep picking until you're really good at those.

An hour of scale practice, working on your techniques. Learn each note by name. Play slowly, accurately, and efficiently along with a metronome. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of patience and accuracy. I'm repeating it for a reason.

An hour of studying theory. Learn notation, then intervals, then basic chord construction, harmony, composition etc.

Spend the last half hour practicing songs. Don't push too hard or you'll end up with sloppy technique, slow down and use a metronome, or play something easier.

You should understand that there is no real line dividing rhythm and lead guitarists though. They're in no way at all independent skill sets. It's pretty important for a lead player to understand how chords function, so that they can harmonize, use arpeggios, or even just intersperse chords throughout lead sections. A guitarist who can't play rhythm isn't really worth the space they take up in the van.

AND REMEMBER TO PRACTICE SLOWLY



Awesome!
#8
Quote by Yannick Vez
Hi saulwwe90

Here are some steps:

1-Know exacly what you want.

2-Find out what a Lead thrash metal guitarist needs to know, and don't waste time in anything else

3-A good teacher will speed your progress, to have you playing in your band as soon as possible.

4-Practice

5-meet other musicians.

END

I can't give you a practice Schedule because:

1- I don't know how to do a proper one
2-Effective practice shecule/routines, are specifically for your needs and change as you progress

Tom hess has a practice routine generator in his website, that's what I use.

Ruts are terrible it will kill your motivation, Learn about effective practice, vídeos in youtube, books, most important get a good teacher.


Best of luck!



Is the practice routine generator effective ? what is the price for the generator ?
#9
Quote by mike52669
Is the practice routine generator effective ? what is the price for the generator ?


1. I highly doubt it. You're better off asking about it here than using a generator. Also, Tom Hess is the supreme asshat of the guitar teaching universe so I wouldn't touch his stuff anyway.

2. If it has a price, it's too much. This is something you can do better yourself for free. But I wouldn't be surprised, since Hess is practically a scam artist.

EDIT: did my googling, and it seems to be 17$ a month. Seriously, stay away from anything he puts out, this is quite literally a scam.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
Last edited by Kevätuhri at Mar 21, 2016,