#1
Hey UG Community, I'm tired of not being able to hear myself, my other guitar player, and my drummer. I play in a lot of small venues/bars/clubs and thus have taken upon myself to research IEMs. Before I start intensely looking for something, I'd like to consult the UG Community.

What I'm looking for:
-Wireless IEM!
-It doesn't have to have a million channels, just something that WORKS.
-I'm looking for something that my guitarist and I can wear, so I'd like a system that can take at least two audio signals and mix them, either on the wireless belt pack (if that's what it is) or on the system itself.
-It has to have microphone/XLR inputs since we want the amp tone.
-The cost is not important. This will be a group purchase, but if I had to set a budget, I'd say about $1,000.

I have no idea how exactly others have their IEMs setup, but in my mind I'm looking for something like this:

Guitar I → amp → microphone → IEM system → wireless receiver for Guitar I → IEM.
Guitar II→ amp → microphone →┘ └ → wireless receiver for Guitar II → IEM.

If anyone can provide a link to something that can come close to those specifications, I'd love you to death.
Or if I'm completely wrong with what I want, please point me in the right direction.
#2
Normally, each user has his own IEM system, which usually consists of a transmitter, receiver, and earphones. The actual mix that you hear depends on a mixer which is a separate thing. The actual mix that you get depends on what gets fed to your output bus.

The IEM transmitter/receivers themselves vary (there ARE multi-channel transmitters) in quality, UHF versions are always better than VHF. Two of the things that will determine overall price will be the quality of the headphones that you use (these will obviously be very personal, especially if you get the ones that are shaped to YOUR ear) and the features available (ability to mix in percentages of ambient, etc.).

This probably should NOT be totally a group purchase; good IEM headphones molded to your ears can be a bit expensive and can only be used by you. You can share the cost of the transmitter/receivers and of a decent mixer (if you don't already have one).
#3
Thanks for the reply. So in the end, I'll have to get two sets.
Is it not possible to have two receivers tuned to the same frequency to only have to use one transmitter?
#4
Quote by clwnz
Thanks for the reply. So in the end, I'll have to get two sets.
Is it not possible to have two receivers tuned to the same frequency to only have to use one transmitter?


It is, but you won't like it <G>. It's also possible to send two different mixes (mono) via a stereo send, but I'm not too keen about that.

Two sets makes the most sense. You'll also find that UHF makes the most sense, that spending more than you think you should on the individually fitted headphones makes sense, and that being able to set up your OWN mix makes sense. Don't worry about it TOO much -- the chances that you'll cheap out on the first run are high and that you'll get it right on the second or third buying cycle are likely. Learning about these things is more hands-on than it should be, but there will definitely be some "Oh, that's MUCH better" moments along the way.
#5
I see. Is there any specific brand/model that you'd recommend? You seem well versed in this and I'm definitely okay with making an investment towards something that will benefit me for a long time. Thanks again.