#1
Like say I'm practicing scales in eight notes at 185 bpm, how do I keep up with the metronome? I'm at 165 bpm right now and the notes are already too fast for me to keep in time with.
#2
if you are having trouble now then obviously you need more practice at current rate before thinking about raising it. only answer there is
#3
Quote by monwobobbo
if you are having trouble now then obviously you need more practice at current rate before thinking about raising it. only answer there is

Well I can play that fast I just cant keep in time with metronome.
#4
Quote by hurricane0202
Well I can play that fast I just cant keep in time with metronome.


Which is essentially not being able to play that fast.

So.. slow the metronome down
#6
Quote by hurricane0202
Gotcha, guess ill have to go back down I've been stuck at 165 for a couple days now.


no you're stuck at the speed at which you can keep up with the metronome. no point in using one if you are just goig to slop it out and call it good.
#7
Quote by monwobobbo
no you're stuck at the speed at which you can keep up with the metronome. no point in using one if you are just goig to slop it out and call it good.

Yeah you're right, I've been getting kind of obsessed with speed here lately . I need to slow down before it becomes a bad habit, I already got the flying fingers going on.
#8
From my experience speed comes when you stop chasing it. Unfortunately beginners have this weird obsession with speed
Last edited by vayne92 at Apr 7, 2015,
#9
Quote by monwobobbo
if you are having trouble now then obviously you need more practice at current rate before thinking about raising it. only answer there is


He's right bro.. It means your fingers are not ready yet. Patient is the key here. Raise your current comfortable tempo by a bit and practice at that tempo until you become comfortable with it. Then rinse and repeat until you get the correct tempo. All the best!
#10
It might seem obvious but try bringing the metronome speed down by half and playing 16th notes instead of 8ths.

So, for example, practice at 82 playing 16th notes (this is the equivalent of your current ceiling of 8th notes at 165). This will feel a lot less crazy as the metronome isn't racing away from you and it also makes you much more likely to find a comfortable "pocket" at this speed that you can then gradually increase.

Worth remembering though that every BPM increment raised at this "half" tempo is the equivalent of two when you were up in the ~160/170 range so go easy on the + button and only move when you have nailed the 16th notes consistently at the current speed.
#11
Quote by vayne92
From my experience speed comes when you stop chasing it. Unfortunately beginners have this weird obsession with speed


I would tend to agree. Contradictory to what many may think i actually believe speed comes when you start slowing down instead of speeding up. I've had many of my students (and myself) practice certain things incredibly slow for an extended amount of time (similar to the stickied "21 day challenge we have here in GT) and that has benefited them (and myself) more in terms of overall playing, as well as speed. It takes a ton of discipline because we all have the urge of speeding up something we can play, but sometimes it is better to stay at a slower tempo to progress faster.

I am not saying always play slow, but slow practice helps you build perfection, muscle memory and effortless playing a whole lot easier.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#12
Iv found lately that by starting to practice a lick or whatever Im trying to get to tempo, that its a lot easier and actually quicker if I start the metronome at 60bpm, play it 4 times then move it up by 5bpm each time.

I do this until I get to about 80bpm. Take a break and do something else then do the same process upto 100, then 120,140 or wherever I want to go.

I do usually find that there will be a certain point that I wont be able to get past straight away. Best way past that is to go down 20 to where its comfortable and just keep trying to take it up, sometimes 1bpm at a time.
Patience and persistance is key here but dont get stuck on that one thing. Keep learning other licks and stuff too as one thing helps another.

Doing things this way has helped me enormously in technique and playing songs but it does take a lot of discipline and patience but its a lot quicker and easier to cement things in good ways than having to unlearn my bad sloppy habits.
#13
Quote by macatom
It might seem obvious but try bringing the metronome speed down by half and playing 16th notes instead of 8ths.

So, for example, practice at 82 playing 16th notes (this is the equivalent of your current ceiling of 8th notes at 165). This will feel a lot less crazy as the metronome isn't racing away from you and it also makes you much more likely to find a comfortable "pocket" at this speed that you can then gradually increase.

Worth remembering though that every BPM increment raised at this "half" tempo is the equivalent of two when you were up in the ~160/170 range so go easy on the + button and only move when you have nailed the 16th notes consistently at the current speed.


Exactly - subdivide. Tap your foot, learn to count in triplets while playing quarters, etc. I've gotten to the point where I'm almost playing drums in my head if that makes sense, and it truly helps.