#2
An exercise I do every day for 5 minutes for speed and hammer ons is this :

3rd string (could be any string but start here) index on 5th fret.

Then while my finger on the fith fret I hammer on the 6th with my middle finger the 7th with my ring and 8th with my pinky.. and sso on

Mix it up<
#3
An exercise I do every day for 5 minutes for speed and hammer ons is this :

3rd string (could be any string but start here) index on 5th fret.

Then while my finger on the fith fret I hammer on the 6th with my middle finger the 7th with my ring and 8th with my pinky.. and sso on

Mix it up<
#4
There is absolutely no practical application for that exercise.. I don't know of a single song on the planet with a chromatic 1-2-3-4 legato section. If you do, however, I am very very eager for you to enlighten me.
You'd be much better off just running legato on standard pentatonic scales.
#5
Its just an exercise guy lol

Works for me to build speed and strength.

The guy obviously looking to get better so why is that not a good exercise to start off with?
#6
Quote by mikerockcity
The guy obviously looking to get better so why is that not a good exercise to start off with?


I just said why. He will never apply an exercise like that to his playing. He'd be better with an exercise that is actually practical.
#7
Why is it that instead of shooting down my tip youre not bringing in youre own exercise?

Dudes like you on forums are the worst.

PEace!
#9
I've seen several great players do that exercise. I myself use it too. Don't listen to the wanna be guitarist Vayne.
#10
Or you could just try learning the licks from tracks like Joker and the Thief (Wolfmother), Thunderstruck (AC/DC), Anvil Everything (White Denim) and basically anything by Tool (Vicarious, Rosetta Stoned, Jambi, Schism...). That's how I learned these types of techniques

Dunno if you can tell but 'regular' exercises bore me to no end

/] 三方 [\
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Last edited by shwilly at Apr 8, 2015,
#11
Quote by mikerockcity
Its just an exercise guy lol

Works for me to build speed and strength.

The guy obviously looking to get better so why is that not a good exercise to start off with?

The point is that practising something that has no musical application is generally not a good use of your time unless there's something extremely specific that you want to really hone in on and get down to an extreme. Frankly, even if you are going to run a chromatic exercise like that (and I don't think you should) then you're better off using something like this:


e|---------------------------------
b|---------------------------------
g|-5-6-5-7-5-8-5-6-7-6-8-6-7-8-7-6-
d|---------------------------------
a|---------------------------------
e|---------------------------------


Which works every pairing of fingers. Another issue with the standard chromatic exercise is that it's really easy to do it badly, you can very easily get it up to very high speeds by rolling your hand rather than actually using your fingers to do the work, the above exercise mitigates that by not allowing the hand rolling motion to really be effective for most of the work.

Quote by xxhendrixfanxx
I've seen several great players do that exercise. I myself use it too. Don't listen to the wanna be guitarist Vayne.

So? I've seen several great players play with such awful technique it gave them carpal tunnel but that didn't stop them playing some ridiculous material. The idea that just because someone who managed to be a great player made it work for them means that it's a good exercise doesn't really mean anything.

I would also take this opportunity to point out that calling someone a wannabe, appealing to authority, not having anything to prove yourself, and then citing yourself as an example... doesn't really work.


TS: The best thing you can do is practice some music you like that uses the technique. However your question is so broad that you can almost certainly pick just about any piece of guitar music and you'll find something good to work on and with. So the question is: what do you want to hear yourself play? I can 100% guarantee that the answer to that isn't going to be "an exercise".
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Quote by Master Foo
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#12
My only thing is which ever exercises, techniques, song who is that guy to start with me?

Im saying dont knock it just bring something better. That guy dint bring anything exept. to try and bring me down
#13
Quote by mikerockcity
My only thing is which ever exercises, techniques, song who is that guy to start with me?

Im saying dont knock it just bring something better. That guy dint bring anything exept. to try and bring me down

Whatever's going on between you two is none of my concern, I just told you why the exercise you gave is really not good and gave you something better. Anything else... whatever dude, you guys carry on, I don't particularly want to get involved.
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Quote by Master Foo
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#14
Quote by vayne92
I just said why. He will never apply an exercise like that to his playing. He'd be better with an exercise that is actually practical.


It's extremely practical, it focuses on making sure you hammer evenly. Guarantee if you went and tried this with some decent speed, you'd end up doing 1h3h4, or 1h2h4 after a few times. It's a very difficult thing to do fast and make it sound good. Pulling off is even harder.

Exercises are to build skill, not imitate songs.

OP, I'm a fan of the 4 finger exercises, in addition to 1234 you can pick any pattern at any fret, change it up. Say we use 2134. Starting at the 6th string at say the 5th fret,

e|-------------------------------------------------------------6p5-7h8---------------------------
b|-------------------------------------------------6p5-7h8--------------6p5-7h8----------------
g|-------------------------------------6p5-7h8--------------------------------------6p5-7h8----
d|-------------------------6p5-7h8----------------------------------------------------------------
a|-------------6p5-7h8-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
e|-6p5-7h8-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ran out of room, but you'd go back down. You could also only pick once - 2p1h3h4. Any pattern at any fret is good. Focus on consistency. Some of my favorite patterns (not frets - fingers) are 1243, 1342, 1432, 1423, 1324, etc. Pulloff and hammer when appropriate. Just picking is great too.

Also, the "3 finger" scales are great. Starting on the 6th or 5th string at any note, just follow the pattern. This is at the 5th fret for A major and A minor.

Major: Use fingers 124 and 134, change it up.
e|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
b|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
g|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
d|-------------------6h7---7p6----------------------------------------------------------
a|----------5h7h9--------------9p7p5--------------------------------------------------
e|--5h7h9------------------------------9p7p5------------------------------------------

Minor: Fingers 123 and 134.
e|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
b|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
g|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
d|--------------------5h7---7p5---------------------------------------------------------
a|-----------5h7h8--------------8p7p5-------------------------------------------------
e|--5h7h8-------------------------------8p7p5-----------------------------------------

Search up the pentatonic scales, it's like the three finger scales but with two fingers.
Last edited by The Bacon Man at Apr 8, 2015,
#16
Quote by The Bacon Man
It's extremely practical, it focuses on making sure you hammer evenly. Guarantee if you went and tried this with some decent speed, you'd end up doing 1h3h4, or 1h2h4 after a few times. It's a very difficult thing to do fast and make it sound good. Pulling off is even harder.

Whether it's hard or not, the exercise itself doesn't actually make you focus on anything, it's still very easy to do it badly, the only thing that can make you focus on hammering and pulling off evenly is actually concentrating on that. An exercise literally can't do it for you.

And the point about usefulness isn't anything to do with building technique, it's to do with having a thing that you can use in a piece of music to show for your practice time.

Quote by The Bacon Man
Exercises are to build skill, not imitate songs.

1 - Those two things are not mutually exclusive. If you attempt to play a song that you don't have the skills for yet then you are building skill are you not? There's really no difference in the skills a person gains by learning to play, for example, Yngwie Malmsteen's Black Star and the skills they gain by sitting and running exercises that have no musical use. The difference is that by learning the song you know a song as well.

2 - What use is the skill without the music? Given that you can very easily practice technique, and practice it well, by playing songs, why would you add the extra step between the two things? There is no point going learn exercise -> learn music -> play music, when you can just go learn music -> play music.

I know I'm repeating myself a lot but I do believe the point deserves repeating: there is almost nothing that an exercise can teach you that finding the right song won't. If all else fails, compose a short etude to focus on a skill, at least that way you still have something that sounds musical at the end of the day rather than just four notes up and down.
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Quote by Master Foo
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#17
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Whether it's hard or not, the exercise itself doesn't actually make you focus on anything, it's still very easy to do it badly, the only thing that can make you focus on hammering and pulling off evenly is actually concentrating on that. An exercise literally can't do it for you.

And the point about usefulness isn't anything to do with building technique, it's to do with having a thing that you can use in a piece of music to show for your practice time.


1 - Those two things are not mutually exclusive. If you attempt to play a song that you don't have the skills for yet then you are building skill are you not? There's really no difference in the skills a person gains by learning to play, for example, Yngwie Malmsteen's Black Star and the skills they gain by sitting and running exercises that have no musical use. The difference is that by learning the song you know a song as well.

2 - What use is the skill without the music? Given that you can very easily practice technique, and practice it well, by playing songs, why would you add the extra step between the two things? There is no point going learn exercise -> learn music -> play music, when you can just go learn music -> play music.

I know I'm repeating myself a lot but I do believe the point deserves repeating: there is almost nothing that an exercise can teach you that finding the right song won't. If all else fails, compose a short etude to focus on a skill, at least that way you still have something that sounds musical at the end of the day rather than just four notes up and down.


True, that does make sense but I still stand by the fact that doing that exercise will work on consistency and tempo, which is in every song. I also like how using all four fingers helps you to keep a proper arch and hand position. At the end of the day this is a silly thing to argue about lmao. Everybody wins
#18
But why not before you start with the songs and wtv it is you feel like playing take 10 minutes to warm up and do these little practise exercises? hammer on, scales, triads etc I but to each his own.
#19
Thanks for the advice i'll take a piece from everyone thats responded!!