#1
Hi,
So I got my Gibson es137 out this morning and noticed that the action is higher. I can still play it as easy as before, should I worry about it? I did the Cape on 1st fret to check the neck and it's fine. The distance between the top of the fret and the middle of the low E string from the 12th fret is around 0.5cm, not sure what it was before I'd say around
0.3-4cm
Thanks!
Ps sorry the spelling mistake in the title

Here's a pic http://postimg.org/image/vudax2xdb/2a61e371/
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Last edited by Guitar137335 at Apr 8, 2015,
#2
Your action is way too high. Your action should be less than half that height.

Having your action change due to different temperatures and levels of humidity is quite common. If the guitar's action has raised, and nothing else was changed between the time that it changed, it means that the guitar has essentially swelled up from moisture or heat. Tightening the truss rod to restore its playability is usually what's to be done here.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#3
Never messed with the truss rod before😷 maybe I got my measuring wrong....
Here's a better pic as the last one made it look higher than what it was http://postimg.org/image/wufq2hvhl/bd2a0fc9/
( click on the image to make it bigger)
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Last edited by Guitar137335 at Apr 8, 2015,
#4
You're not measuring your action correctly. Loads of people suggest measuring from the string to the fretboard, but this is a load of crap. Different fret sizes affect how low your action can be set relative to the fretboard, and since many guitars have different fret sizes to one another, measuring action in that way isn't helpful. Measure from the crown of the fret to the string. Never the fretboard itself.

Measuring with feeler gauges or an action gauge (that stewmac sells, although stupidly overpriced) is a lot more accurate too. You can improvise by slipping a number of guitar picks of a known thickness under the string without disturbing it, and adding up the thicknesses (or use some calipers if you cannot math) of the picks to get an approximate measurement.

Adjusting the truss rod is really simple. There are tons of online guides showing you what to do. People (mainly guitar companies and guitar stores) try to instil an irrational fear of adjusting it, so that they get to set up the guitar for you, and they get paid to do it. But in reality you'd have to be an utter monkey to do any damage. So long as you adjust it 1/4 turn at a time at the most, and not to overtighten if it feels very tight, you should be fine.

An acceptable amount of neck relief is 0.5mm @ the 7th fret. You can measure it by capoing the first fret and fretting the 17th fret and measuring the action at the 7th. The string itself becomes your straight edge to see the neck's curvature.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 8, 2015,
#5
I got 4 0.73 (2.93mm) picks under the 12th fret.
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#6
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
You're not measuring your action correctly. Loads of people suggest measuring from the string to the fretboard, but this is a load of crap. Different fret sizes affect how low your action can be set relative to the fretboard, and since many guitars have different fret sizes to one another, measuring action in that way isn't helpful. Measure from the crown of the fret to the string. Never the fretboard itself.

Measuring with feeler gauges or an action gauge (that stewmac sells, although stupidly overpriced) is a lot more accurate too. You can improvise by slipping a number of guitar picks of a known thickness under the string without disturbing it, and adding up the thicknesses (or use some calipers if you cannot math) of the picks to get an approximate measurement.

Adjusting the truss rod is really simple. There are tons of online guides showing you what to do. People (mainly guitar companies and guitar stores) try to instil an irrational fear of adjusting it, so that they get to set up the guitar for you, and they get paid to do it. But in reality you'd have to be an utter monkey to do any damage. So long as you adjust it 1/4 turn at a time at the most, and not to overtighten if it feels very tight, you should be fine.

An acceptable amount of neck relief is 0.5mm @ the 7th fret. You can measure it by capoing the first fret and fretting the 17th fret and measuring the action at the 7th. The string itself becomes your straight edge to see the neck's curvature.


I was about to get mad when you said its a load of crap, but I misread it. You can totally measure the distance with a ruler without a capo but you have to do it from the top of the fret itself to the string. And while in playing position. I find about 2mm at the 7th fret is good, if not ever so slightly on the high side.
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#7
Quote by Guitar137335
I got 4 0.73 (2.93mm) picks under the 12th fret.

Yeah that's a bit high. You should be able to get just under 2mm at the 12th for the low E and the high E should be as low as 1.3-1.4mm That's considered a pretty good, low action by most.
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Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#8
Thanks!
Nothing wrong with it being a little high, still plays like butter
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#9
I remember being intimidated about adjusting the truss rod, but it's the easiest thing in the world once you know what to do and how to measure. Good videos here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxO85hmvmhg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b72m2ZKBPA

Since you have a capo, you can put that on the first fret, then press down on about the 17th fret with one finger, then tap the string at about the 7th or 8th fret with another finger to see how much neck bow you have.

The amount of bow really should be very slight -- just enough to see that the string is moving downward. Don't forget to check low E and high E, and always check neck relief with the guitar in the playing position -- never with the fretboard facing the ceiling, because gravity impacts the string position.

From there, factory spec on a Gibson for string action is 5/64" low E and 3/64" high E at the 12th fret (top of fret to bottom of string), which is about 2mm and 1.5mm. Check with guitar in playing position.

Always, always, always set the neck bow/relief first, then when you've got it where you want it, use the thumbscrews on the bridge to adjust the action height to where you like it.

Good luck.
Last edited by PB26 at Apr 8, 2015,
#10
I like the strings low in general ... but ... when/if I use a slide I grab a guitar that strings are a little higher than my normal , the slide works better for me with the strings are a little higher ...... the point is adjust the string height to what you like or feel comfortable with