#1
This guy playing an original 57 Gibson LPJ comes up with a tone that instantly became my most favorite clean tone I've ever heard. Skip 2 minutes in.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUdq59CRcxk

For my tastes at least, that's an awesome, unique, near-acoustic sound out of a solid body electric guitar. And of course it melts your face when he turns up the crunch. Such a beautiful instrument. Now, I know that nothing beats the original, but I'll never have four grand for a 57 LPJ. So I'd like to know if you think a P90 in the bridge of just whatever guitar, with the tone and volume rolled off, would generally give that kind of sound? It's just such a full clean sound and I love it. Tradition is to go to the neck pickup for bright clean sounds, but somehow that bridge P90 manages to produce just the right amount of bass and treble without too much quack.

So is it just the pickup? Maybe the strings? They sound so bright for an electric. Or just the whole guitar, and I'll never get the sound without robbing a bank or building a time machine?

Thanks for opinions.
#2
Good pups & a good amp- that's the base of your tonal pyramid. Knowing how to work the controls on each is part of the secret.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#3
I have a Les Paul with a pair of P90s. The bridge in mine will do that acoustic type sound.

A P90 in the neck is warmer and fatter... more piano like than acoustic guitar.

That said, LPJs are fairly cheap if that's the kind of sound/vibe you dig.
#4
It has alot to do with the amp there playing as well as just the guitar. And yes Danny right working the controls properly is a big thing with p90s, changing the volume from 7 to 10 almost sounds like a different pickup. But I'm a big fan of p90s and think everyone needs a guitar with them.

There are some good cheap p90 guitars out there if you look I would keep an eye out for a prs se one if you can find one.
Last edited by mhanbury2 at Apr 10, 2015,
#5
I'm just now learning how fun P90s can be- I've picked up 3 guitars in the past year or so that have at least one, and have added a couple more to my G.A.S. list.

One good option to look for if you want to try the single bridge P90 option is the Reverend Sensei Jr.
http://www.reverendguitars.com/instrument/sensei-jr/

They go in and out of production, and are currently made in 2 finishes, and they cost @$800. Past finishes include a Satin Red and a TV Yellow.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Apr 10, 2015,
#7
Mhanbury2, are you on Facebook? I ask because I am not, and I just noticed Jillard's website- while listed on their Facebook site- is seemingly non-existent.
http://www.jillardguitars.com

They may have let it lapse, but it could also be unintentional.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#8
That's weird, it was up earlier this year. I did use Facebook to contact him and he responded to everything fairly quick there.
#9
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#10
Back to axes...

Reverend makes quite a few guitars with P90s, and the P90s they use are pretty good. They make their guitars in Korea, so they won't break your piggybank.

Other brands I'd look at for quality, affordable P90-equipped guitars are Godin and Hagstrom.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#11
Quote by mattmatunis
This guy playing an original 57 Gibson LPJ comes up with a tone that instantly became my most favorite clean tone I've ever heard. Now, I know that nothing beats the original, but I'll never have four grand for a 57 LPJ. So I'd like to know if you think a P90 in the bridge of just whatever guitar, with the tone and volume rolled off, would generally give that kind of sound?


First, that's not an LPJ, and never EVER call a vintage Les Paul Junior an LPJ. That designation is reserved for the cheapest piece of crap that Gibson ever produced (just a couple of years ago, and since abandoned). You can refer to it as an LP Jr and people will know what you're talking about.

Second, you don't need a '57 to produce that tone. I actually have several guitars with '55 P90's and one with a '49 P90 (it's a single pickup, but it's in the neck position on an ES-175), so I have some basis of comparison. A current P90 guitar with the same basic configuration will give you the same results.

I have a very recent (and inexpensive) clone of an LP DC Special (thick mahogany body, mahogany neck, two P90's, double cutaway) than cops that tone all day long. It's not about the pickups, it's not about the age of the guitar or ANY of that. As the guy suggests before the two minute mark, the business of having just one pickup sort of forces you to learn what really using the volume and tone knobs on the guitar can do (admit it, you've probably played 99% of the time with both dimed). There's also the business of learning to play closer to the bridge and closer to the neck. That LP DC Special of mine has some really nice handwound P90's installed, but there's nothing important about that; they're simply a close match for the originals.

The volume knob isn't there just to change volume. You'll find that it can clean up the sound a LOT when dialed back with, actually, not a lot of change in the overall volume of the sound. And what we call a "tone" knob (actually just treble rolloff) can make a pretty significant difference in the pickup as well. The two in combination are really NOT superfluous.
#12
It's how they approach the instrument. They're using a guitar with a single pickup with a volume and tone control likely through a single-channel amp. The only ways a player can make tonal changes are the way he plays and the volume and tone knobs on the guitar unless you consider walking over to your amp and turning some knobs mid-song. So when playing simpler gear, you have to approach it differently if you want to get more than one sound out of it.

Most modern guitars have multiple pickups so you can easily get different tones out of them without touching the knobs or adjusting how you play. And many have coil-splitting options which makes it even easier. So you never have to touch the volume or tone knobs to get different tones. Most modern amps have multiple channels so you have a dedicated clean and dirty channel. It doesn't matter where your volume knob or tone knob is or how hard or soft you play when it comes to getting clean or dirty sounds. It's usually all through the amp now.
Last edited by JELIFISH19 at Apr 10, 2015,