#2
well it's clearly a natural harmonic. The pitch shifts a little though.
I thought initially that maybe he was bending the string before the nut, but pretty sure that's not the case. Perhaps he just has his foot on some variety of pitch shifting pedal. Whatever he's doing, however, it's definitely not too complicated.
#3
It looks like he is pushing the body of the guitar down whilst holding the neck which in theory makes the neck bend slightly causing the strings to bend to, giving the same effect a tremolo would have.
#4
Quote by AxeBox
It looks like he is pushing the body of the guitar down whilst holding the neck which in theory makes the neck bend slightly causing the strings to bend to, giving the same effect a tremolo would have.


I thought that was a possibility, but I didn't think the pitch shifting effect would be as drastic as it was. Perhaps it would make that much of a shift
#5
It's a neck bend. No doubt about it as far as I can see; he's putting a lot of pressure on that guitar in that moment. Besides, it's only a half step bend down, that's really not that much at all.
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#6
Quote by AxeBox
It looks like he is pushing the body of the guitar down whilst holding the neck which in theory makes the neck bend slightly causing the strings to bend to, giving the same effect a tremolo would have.


+1

Never had the guts to try that. Then again I have a guitar with a trem so it's kind of a pointless risk.
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#7
Quote by vayne92
I thought that was a possibility, but I didn't think the pitch shifting effect would be as drastic as it was. Perhaps it would make that much of a shift

It can be. I did this kind of thing a lot when my only guitar was an Epiphone G-400, which admittedly has a less stable neck than a Les Paul, but basically it's a matter of leverage, vectors, and all that good stuff. The way he leans into it and angles his right arm so the force he puts on the body is more or less parallel to the force he puts on the neck with his left hand, he creates a pretty large moment of force in the direction the neck is most prone to move. I suspect the mahogany neck helps too. I just tried it for reference, and I can manage a full-tone bend pretty easily.

Quote by Dave_Mc
Never had the guts to try that. Then again I have a guitar with a trem so it's kind of a pointless risk.

For what it's worth, while I certainly wouldn't recommend doing it constantly, I don't think it poses a significant risk to the guitar. To do damage with the amount of force your average guy could exert in playing position I think it'd either have to be sustained for minutes, maybe hours, or come in the form of an impact. In either case I'd argue that'd constitute having done something wrong. Now, were you to lay the guitar on the ground, put a foot on it, and then start pulling at the neck, you might start breaking things. Again, though, I'd call that a bit of a technique issue.

EDIT: As an afterthought, I suspect if you were about to damage the guitar with a neck bend, it would have made at least some audible protest by that point. Could be wrong though.
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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Apr 10, 2015,
#8
Michael Schenker does this all the time when he's playing. If I tried it I'd probably snap my guitar's neck off.
#9
Quote by K33nbl4d3

For what it's worth, while I certainly wouldn't recommend doing it constantly, I don't think it poses a significant risk to the guitar. To do damage with the amount of force your average guy could exert in playing position I think it'd either have to be sustained for minutes, maybe hours, or come in the form of an impact. In either case I'd argue that'd constitute having done something wrong. Now, were you to lay the guitar on the ground, put a foot on it, and then start pulling at the neck, you might start breaking things. Again, though, I'd call that a bit of a technique issue.


Yeah. And I'm not exactly a candidate for world's strongest man, either.

Still, not keen to chance it either. I'd feel a right tool if I broke the thing.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#10
Quote by K33nbl4d3
For what it's worth, while I certainly wouldn't recommend doing it constantly, I don't think it poses a significant risk to the guitar. To do damage with the amount of force your average guy could exert in playing position I think it'd either have to be sustained for minutes, maybe hours, or come in the form of an impact. In either case I'd argue that'd constitute having done something wrong. Now, were you to lay the guitar on the ground, put a foot on it, and then start pulling at the neck, you might start breaking things. Again, though, I'd call that a bit of a technique issue.

I agree.
While it IS possible, it's not likely as long as you don't overdo it.
I've been doing it for years ever since I first saw Randy Rhoads do it during crazy train at one point with no ill effects to the guitar